Armin Strom Gravity Fire Watch Hands-On

Armin Strom Gravity Fire Watch Hands-On

Armin Strom Gravity Fire Watch Hands On   hands on

Armin Strom offers a unique flavor of independent watch making with contemporary designs and in-house made movements. Several years ago they debuted their first in-house made movement and have since built upon it. Before that time the movements they used, while not strictly made in-house, were often highly customized with skeletonization work or modules that added functionality.

Armin Strom has set a stride over the last few years with a core theme that seems to work for them. I use the term "contemporary" to describe their timepieces because while they are modern, they aren't futuristic, nor are they at all retro in their execution. I personally find it refreshing to find companies able to make watches that in my opinion very much fit in with "today" as opposed to the past or future. Speaking of today, right now I'd like to check out the Armin Strom Gravity Fire ref. RG12-GF.90 watch.

Armin Strom Gravity Fire Watch Hands On   hands on

Armin Strom Gravity Fire Watch Hands On   hands on

The Gravity collection is a family of watches that are each part of a limited edition. The various Gravity collection watches are named for each of the four elements - and this piece being the Fire. Why not just call the collection "Elements?" Well that would make sense but Armin Strom has done that before, and the "Gravity" name refers to the operation of the automatic rotor. This isn't the first time a collection has models that each bear the name of an element. The idea is pretty simple though: Armin Strom chooses a movement and theme, and then produces four versions that offer various color and case material options.

For example, the Armin Strom Gravity Air has a titanium case, the Water, a steel case; the Earth, a PVD black steel case; and the Fire has an 18k rose gold case. At just over 43mm wide and 13mm thick, the case is hefty but not massive. The case has a fresh but simple look to it that frames the dial properly. People often ask about the "lip" on the lower part of the case. What they are looking at is actually a space intended for a unique engraving. Armin Strom recommends that buyers opt to have their initials placed there. It isn't that they are trying to prevent resale, but rather they feel that it is part of their particular buying experience, just like getting a shirt with your initials embroidered into the sleeves.

Armin Strom Gravity Fire Watch Hands On   hands on

14 comments
SuperStrapper
SuperStrapper

Armin Strom is a funny beast. Would they make my short list? Likely not. I think the best part about them is that they have a recognizable identity in that offset dial arrangement they always use. Unfortunately, I don;t like the look, so it keeps them away from my consideration plate. Plus, they rarely use dials - they are big on skeletonization, even if just partially. I like a nice view of the movement, but from the rear. Top side, I'm a fan of good dials, not an interesting lack of them (especially if the result is a view of my wrist. If I want to see what my wrist looks like, I'll take a watch off, not put one on). 

spiceballs
spiceballs

Certainly an interesting watch for those who prefer this look, but maybe tidy up the indices and shave 15 grand+, and they might get a few more takers?

emenezes
emenezes

I wouldn't call post-modern design a design of today, but rather so... 90s, so... 20th century! :-)

HowieBoyd
HowieBoyd

Why is the back of the watch engraved with the word "Manual"?

Ulysses31
Ulysses31

The movement looks OK but overall this is a fugly watch with a chunky look.  Mainly it's the markers that look bad.

MarkCarson
MarkCarson

I too appreciate the convenience of an automatic. But part of the fun with the twin barrel manual wind Armin Strong watches is winding them and watching the gears and counter rotating barrels while doing so.

MarkCarson
MarkCarson

@spiceballsMaybe the "Water" reference which has a steel case is more what you had in mind price wise. But the dial still needs some improvement.

MarkCarson
MarkCarson

@Ulysses31 I agree that the mixture of 5 minute markers with hour makers at 12, 3 and 6 is unusual. But what I think makes it less pleasing is that the numbers crowd the baton minute markers. Looks like too much is being jammed together rather than having a cohesive look. The same font on the seconds sub-dial works OK where things are more balanced.

spiceballs
spiceballs

@MarkCarson @spiceballs  Mark, you are correct of course, I just "googled" AS and yes s/s models are advertised at around US11K. for "water" tourbillon - with 50m water resistance on  leather strap?  I suppose in comparison with other offerings this is about par but I'd recommend that they rethink their dial layout, up the water resistance and provide a s/s bracelet for their "water" line, which ! believe was written previously?

Ulysses31
Ulysses31

@MarkCarson @Ulysses31 That's it.  It looks cluttered.  If the font were a little less angular and the minute markers thinner and shorter it would look a lot nicer to me.  They could even just lose those numerals every five minutes along.  Because the font has mainly vertical elements, it blends in with the adjacent markers into a crowded jumble.

MarkCarson
MarkCarson

@spiceballs I don't thnk that the 11K USD model is a tourbillon (if it was, that would be a deal for a Swiss whirlwind). But yeah that is a somewhat reasonable price point for an interesting watch with an in-house movement.