Ball Engineer II Magneto S Watch With Iris Anti-Magnetic Caseback

Ball Engineer II Magneto S Watch With Iris Anti-Magnetic Caseback

Ball Engineer II Magneto S Watch With Iris Anti Magnetic Caseback   watch releases

Perhaps the most exciting new Ball watch from Baselworld 2014 was not yet complete, but we did get to play with a prototype. It is the Engineer II Magneto S watch, and it offers a distinct approach to offering a modern anti-magnetic timepiece. In a nutshell, here is how it works. The bezel of the watch actually operates an iris-style shield that opens and closes over the movement. Ball calls this new system "A-PROOF" and it is being debuted here in the Engineer II Magneto watch.

Of course, A-PROOF comes at a time when anti-magnetic is "hot" thanks to Omega's >15,000 Gauss watch and new Master Co-Axial movements. Omega's approach is more passive and automatic in the sense that their movements aren't really magnetic at all, so therefore they simply don't react to most magnetic fields. Ball takes a more interactive approach that, while perhaps a bit less practical, makes for a good tool tech toy. Ball claims that most of their anti-magnetic watches are resistant to about 12,000 A/m, while A-PROOF allows a watch to be resistant to 80,000 A/m.

Ball Engineer II Magneto S Watch With Iris Anti Magnetic Caseback   watch releases

The iris-style blades that open and close like a camera shutter are produced from a new type of metal for the watch industry called "mumetal." Sadly that is the best name they someone with little creative skills was able to come up with. Mumetal is an alloy and, according to Ball, is far superior to shielding against magnetic fields than the soft irons historically used. Of course, the coolest thing is seeing the blades open and close over the movement, which I admit to being very fun to watch.

Ball includes more tech into the Engineer II Magneto S watch including SpringLOCK (covered more here), which protects against the accuracy destroying nature of vibrations. This is all part of the Ball caliber RR1103-CSL movement which is a base ETA that has been heavily modified and is COSC Chronometer certified. It is cool that if you anticipate being around magnetic fields you can use the bezel to "secure" the movement, but if you want to see the movement through the sapphire crystal caseback you can do that as well. Of course, you need to be aware of whether you are going to be exposed to a magnetic field, but if you are at least you don't need to remove the watch from your wrist to protect it.

Ball Engineer II Magneto S Watch With Iris Anti Magnetic Caseback   watch releases

Ball Engineer II Magneto S Watch With Iris Anti Magnetic Caseback   watch releases

The prototype version of the Engineer II Magneto S watch we played with at Baselworld 2014 wasn't quite ready for action so we didn't take pictures, but I can say that the concept works and the watch is cool looking. The Magneto S is 42mm wide and not too thick at 12.9mm. The overall design is rather military and retro inspired, especially with the cordura textile strap and green accents. I do like the legible dial and of course it is fitted with tritium gas tubes in the hands and hour markers for illumination. It's really a great watch if you like green accents, but not a green watch.

I anticipate Ball to commercially release the Engineer II Magneto S ref. NM3022C-NCJ-BK watch later in 2014. It will be a test for the new A-PROOF technology, which, if successful, will show up in future watches–though it will likely not be as prevalent as SpringLOCK that has more application in a wider array of Ball timepieces. This is also one of at least two comic book sounding watches–in addition to the Magneto S there is also the Marvelight for 2014. ballwatch.com

10 comments
rsr0109
rsr0109

Do you know what the end to end lug length is?  Thanks.

spiceballs
spiceballs

Watch back OK I suppose, if you're into gimmicks, but face needs work in my opinion - in danger of dropping the Ball?

Panagiotis
Panagiotis

I don't know why but the tritium tubes look wrong on a vintage-styled piece. That's my only gripe with most ball designs.

Other than that, I think it's pretty attractive--I'm too bored to read right now so I'm just looking at the pretty pictures :)

SuperStrapper
SuperStrapper

They should have just called it the Ball Fifty Fathoms.

DG Cayse
DG Cayse

Interesting gimmick, the 'iris' thingy that is.

IMO, the SpringLOCK vibration protection is a much handier feature for everyday life.


After all, the Anti-Mag feature requires the wearer to be aware of entering into an environment where magnetics are a problem for the watch - thus, it requires the user to take an action in activating the 'iris.'

The user could also simply not wear the watch into the magnetic environment - problem solved.


Just my observation. I am a fan of Ball watches and think they do offer a very fine product.

Ulysses31
Ulysses31

Despite the god-awful illustration, it looks like it could be quite a stylish watch.  The movement is tiny though, which is something I always hate when it is as obvious as this.  Maybe it's a requirement of ensuring protection with the iris, which is a cool, if impractical feature.  One solitary moment of forgetfulness and you're hosed until you can find a demagnetiser.  Whoever thought serif-fonts look good on a watch should be beaten with a sack of door-knobs.

Dsmcastro
Dsmcastro

So they did on the caseback what Valbray does on the dial? But, the Valbray are only decorative.

DangerussArt
DangerussArt

mumetal? really?

Are you certain it's not Mμ Metal  μ being the 12th letter in the Greek alphabet and signifying "micro" in academic terms?


In electromagnetismpermeability is the measure of the ability of a material to support the formation of a magnetic field within itself. In other words, it is the degree of magnetization that a material obtains in response to an applied magnetic field. Magnetic permeability is typically represented by the Greek letter μ. The term was coined in September, 1885 by Oliver Heaviside. The reciprocal of magnetic permeability is magnetic reluctivity.


Still a silly name, but I'm trying to make some sense of it.

DG Cayse
DG Cayse

@DangerussArt Imagine my fun this morning at my local watch shop, who is a Ball AD by the way, trying to get him to pronounce "mumetal" correctly - he is Chinese as is everyone else in the shop.

He doesn't expect to offer these other than as a client request/special order item.

I do expect him to sell a few...research people and those who want the "latest and greatest" and all that.

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