Casio G-Shock Gravitymaster GPW2000-1A GPS Bluetooth Connected Watch

Casio G-Shock Gravitymaster GPW2000-1A GPS Bluetooth Connected Watch

Casio G-Shock Gravitymaster GPW2000-1A GPS Bluetooth Connected Watch Watch Releases

Enter the Casio G-Shock Gravitymaster GPW2000-1A, the very first Bluetooth-connected model in the Master of G series and a watch that was designed specifically for pilots – but not only in the ways you'd expect. To be officially debuted at Baselworld 2017 and available from May 2017, let's have a sneak preview at this 57.1mm G-Shock Gravitymaster.

Casio G-Shock Gravitymaster GPW2000-1A GPS Bluetooth Connected Watch Watch Releases

Usual stuff we'll look at later, but first, here's what's new and unique about the Casio G-Shock Gravitymaster GPW2000-1A. As you can see, it is a fully analog G-Shock in the sense that it has no digital displays whatsoever, and yet it packs both Bluetooth connectivity and GPS Hybrid Wave Ceptor technology. Better still, it sort of merges the two to cater for what has to be a rather niche market of pilots and adventurers, and... those are about the only people I can momentarily imagine to be possibly using such functions.

Casio says they have built the Casio G-Shock Gravitymaster GPW2000-1A "specifically for aviation experts" by combining their Mission Stamp function with Bluetooth technology. In essence, "Mission Stamp" uses the built-in GPS to record both time and location over a set period of time and then transmit this data via Bluetooth to what they call a "Smartphone Link app" where, ultimately, said information can be viewed as a flight log.

Casio G-Shock Gravitymaster GPW2000-1A GPS Bluetooth Connected Watch Watch Releases

For us mere non-super-pilot mortals, that pretty much means you can possibly rely on the Casio G-Shock Gravitymaster GPW2000-1A to keep track of your progress when you go for a hike or get lost at sea – though there will not be any fitness/health related data to go with it. If you've ever handled or owned a complex G-Shock, you'll know that they can at times be mind-bendingly complicated to get to work, so we're looking forward to going hands-on with this novelty at Baselworld next week (Geez, it is next week?) to let you know how all this GPS-Bluetooth combination stuff works in real life.

Talk about obscure features, the Casio G-Shock Gravitymaster GPW2000-1A will also (at last!) contain a longitude indicator in addition to a latitude indicator at the 9 o'clock position on the dial, "adding a key function to record travel location and history for pilots carrying out their missions."

Casio G-Shock Gravitymaster GPW2000-1A GPS Bluetooth Connected Watch Watch Releases

More ordinary but still cool features include the GPS Hybrid Wave Ceptor atomic time receiving technology, triple time adjust, magnetic field- and shock-resistance, 200m depth rating, super LED backlight, 28 cities plus UTC world time, daily alarm, timer, 1-second stopwatch, a sapphire crystal front, and carbon band lock and insert to prevent screws from loosening due to strong vibrations. In short: it's a full-spec G-Shock wrapped in a massive 57.1mm-wide case.

Casio G-Shock Gravitymaster GPW2000-1A GPS Bluetooth Connected Watch Watch Releases

In essence, the Casio G-Shock Gravitymaster GPW2000-1A with its highly specialized flight log system is perfectly in line with the brand's long history of producing G-Shocks for extremely niche use scenarios, just think of the high-tech Gulfmaster (reviewed here), this quite epic Mudmaster (reviewed here), this ultimate diving tool watch, and of course, the Master of Gravity. And if that weren't enough G-Shock reading for you, I highly recommend that you check out (or revisit) Ariel's truly incredible G-Shock manufacture visit.

While we have to carefully manage our energy levels during our 9-day thrash at Baselworld, I'll certainly dedicate some to figuring out how this Bluetooth-GPS-flight log system works when we go hands-on with it next week. The Casio G-Shock Gravitymaster GPW2000-1A is priced at $800 and will be available from May 2017. gshock.com

What do you think?
  • Thumbs up (64)
  • I want it! (58)
  • Interesting (31)
  • I love it! (22)
  • Classy (6)
  • That thing’s fantastic. I think having a “flight log,” or a hike log, or a sail log is far more useful that knowing how many steps I’ve taken or what my bloody heart rate was.
    And hey, the latitude thing is just cool.

  • Mark1884

    I am always “shocked” (sorry) to see the innovation and longevity from the G-Shock platform. My 1987 G-Shock is still functioning perfectly, alas the resin/plastic housing has since disappeared. The watch now looks like some industrial post apocalyptic timekeeper.
    The new Gravitymaster is another “wow” from Casio. Nobody does it better.

  • IG

    No WATER RESIST label? I am disappoint.

    • Word Merchant

      Not hand wound either.

      • IG

        I don’t expect a hand-wound G-Shock.

        • ??????

          And no NATO option..

    • Yan Fin

      It is Gravity -proof. Should be enough

  • Word Merchant

    This does not look like a $800 watch. $350 tops.

    • IG

      I’d not buy that for a dollar.

  • Marius

    It’s absolutely preposterous to think that a real pilot would wear such a monstrosity! There is one, and only one brand that real pilots use — Bremont! Let me spell it out for you: B R E M O N T.

    Bremont`s Nick and Giles English are accomplished RAF fighter pilots who have completed successful missions during the Second World War, Vietnam War, Korean War, Gulf War, and Balkan War. If you want a proper pilot’s watch designed by real pilots, look no further than Bremont.

    • Mark1884

      Thank you…. I actually laughed out loud

      • Drazen B

        Must admit me too.

    • chaos215bar2

      Hey, I thought advertising in the comments section was against the TOS.

  • Raymond Wilkie

    I HATE G SHOCK WATCHES…..their i said it………… I’ts got to be the ugliest range of watches out there ( and it has some stiff competition ) I mean just look at it, all lumpy and bumpy and full of useless information cluttering up the dial. Names like mud master and gravity master is just ridiculous.The most dangerous thing a $800 g shock wearer is going to do is get on the subway. I cant tell you how much i hate them…………have i already said that ?,………moving on

    *Heavy plastic sounding Clunk™

    • Mark1884

      You must really like the $8200 Casio Hammer tone then

      • Raymond Wilkie

        Look, who am i to judge what someone decides to wear on their wrist. If you feel comfortable with it on and reflects a bit of your personality then go for it,…………….If i saw anyone with this on i would just burst out laughing

        https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/c9aaa1b990cd8cf6ae8d643f6460acc255f9ef9f383eed9e06ba701b45420eac.jpg .

        • Mark1884

          I don’t wear my G-Shock any longer, but I do think the technology is kinda cool. I wore mine at work, and needed a tough watch that could take a bang and keep going. In fact, G-Shock’s were very popular and in style as a work watch back in the day.
          I do not think the current generation is really worth the asking price.
          I really don’t think the Hammer Tone is worth the $6K-$8K that they are going for.
          But like you, if someone really wants one…. go for it.
          Me, I would take that money and buy a Sub.

        • Mark1884
          • Raymond Wilkie

            You’r right, that one look soooooo much better .

          • Yeah has that classy Invicta look to it.

          • Mark1884

            Well, I never stated this one even looked good or was better than the one you posted.
            Just illustrating what a $8k Casio looks like.
            That’s all.

        • Shinytoys

          no laughing at the Casio Fan Boys 🙂

  • Shawn Lavigne

    if i was a teenager i’d sure like to find it under the tree for xmas.

  • Mitchell Fried

    Solar powered? I’m in!

    • Mitchell Fried

      24 minute stop watch? I’m out!

  • Yan Fin

    Mind boggling technology, not just another smartwatch. Don’t imagine needing one though.

  • Ever tried to receive GPS signals from inside an aircraft? I have my doubts this thing will even get enough signal to log your flight except before your board and after you deplane. Maybe Arnold Schwarzenegger could wear a 57 mm watch, but I’m sure I can’t. And the latitude display toy like and useless if you really need to know you latitude. Just a big toy that really serves no purpose. Plus is has that clean, elegant and sophisticated G-Shock look that a Transformer would appreciate.

  • SuperStrapper

    Interesting, but I prefer all-digital Gs.

  • The Deplorable Boogur T. Wang

    I have my suspicions that Casio -s ‘over-complicating’ themselves out of a market position.

    Just too much for too few.
    Don’t get me wrong, I am wearing my G-Shock as I type this and do like them marque; but, as I said…“Too much for Too Few.”

  • Shinytoys

    Dog gone it that’s a big watch, and I’m a huge fan of Casio. I especially like the longitude/latitude offering for tracking a route or planning a bike ride. It’s also blue tooth capable so I can see it on my motorcycle dash. Next Casio has to find a way to power it with solar capabilities and I’m in.

  • Ulysses31

    So… the name Gravitymaster is another way of saying “Shockproof”? I don’t see any other reasons why it might be called that other than sounding cool. Only Casio boast about their shock-proofing, as if a shock-proof piece of rubber and plastic is some sort of engineering marvel. The GPS tracking function is nice – the Lat-Long indicator scale is so crude as to be useless – it’s a gimmick for some visual interest, nothing more.

  • chaos215bar2

    I have to say, I like the GPW-1000 and I like certain aspects of the design here (the dedicated day display is a nice addition), but I’m not really sure where Casio is going functionality-wise. If I want to track my location via GPS, I’ll use a much more fully featured watch. (Say, one of Garmin’s offerings.) The fact that the GPW-1000 was entirely self-contained was actually a feature for me.

    The moment you design a watch that connects with other devices, you’re just asking for the whole package to become obsolete. First you need to design the apps the watch syncs with, for enough platforms to be interesting. And you need to actually design them well, or they just detract from the experience. Then you need to keep on top of updates, because you’ve introduced enough complexity into the mix that there will be bugs and things will break or be obsoleted over time on the phone side.

    The moment Casio decides they don’t care enough to spend the money to keep their app working well, you lose major portions of this watch’s capabilities. That seems somewhat antithetical to what G-Shock stands for.

  • rsg

    Looks interesting and I wonder if Casio improved the movement compared to the GPW-1000 series. Right now for GPS lock the best seems to be the Citizen F900 movement which will get a GPS lock while flying on a commercial aircraft.

    Getting a time lock from 3 sources is good idea and doing it automatically has its advantages. The Citizen F900 you have to adjust for DST and leap second, so the Casio has a big advantage along with being very rugged. Something others can’t compete with given the same features/capabilities. The smartphone app may need work on it and it could be a common app for all Casio Bluetooth enabled watches. Hopefully Casio keeps the app up-to-date.

    My only nitpick are the hands are a bit short, but I’ll probably look at this watch if I can get it new with Casio warranty for around $600. Looks like a winner.

  • Mare? Rudolf-Thomas

    I have the Mudmaster but if I were to buy the gpw 2000 I would not.Many features from gpw 1000 have been lost and the latitude ang longitude in my opinion are not useful for the pilots.I mean you are in a plane you have all that stuff or am I wrong?

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