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Celadon Imperial Watch Review

Celadon Imperial Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

The concept that fuels the aesthetic behind microbrand Celadon is “made in China with pride.” Not only are the watches themselves completely made in China—not that that’s an unusual thing—but Celadon goes out of their way to emphasize their “Chineseness” in contrast to the many brands that want to downplay it. That alone is slightly interesting and refreshing, and now I’ve had the chance to see how their flagship and first model, the Celadon Imperial, incorporates this idea—and, more importantly, how it performs as an interesting daily or formal watch.

Celadon Imperial Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

Celadon Imperial Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

I’ll begin with a personal note because it ties in to the question of who Celadon is making these watches for. Frustrated with Chinese watches with derivative, jumbled “European” designs and even decorative, nonsense English, I first became aware of Celadon through Internet chatter several years ago when living in China. It seems there are people out there like me who would be interested in a Chinese watch specifically because it is Chinese rather than despite it. According to the brand’s Singaporean founder, Ben Chee, the majority of his customers are indeed expats in China or those with close ties or some other specific interest in China—but of course, he says he would also like to expand more into the native Chinese market as well.

Celadon Imperial Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

If you’re visiting or living in China, many people know you can find some interesting watches for a good price if you look hard enough. Finding tasteful, high-quality modern Chinese watches, however, that are not either half-plagiarized Swiss designs or gimmicky and over-the-top in their “Chineseness” can take a bit more work, to say the least. Obviously, there is some irony in the stigma against Chinese-made products, as so many of the “prestigious” Swiss watch companies (and others) source some of their parts from Chinese suppliers, but the stigma is persistent and not unfounded. Part of the problem with Chinese watches in general is weak quality control and a lack of reliable information rather than an inability to produce high-quality products and workmanship.

Celadon Imperial Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

Celadon Imperial Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

Celadon’s watches are made more or less entirely by Beijing Watch Company. Beijing watches enjoy some relative prestige and high regard within the country but are not well-known outside of China, and that’s mostly because of how confusing, chaotic, and changeable the Chinese watch market is. Here’s a little taste of what I mean.

Celadon Imperial Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

Celadon Imperial Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

The Beijing Watch Company is among the oldest and most well-known Chinese watch “factories” with a good number of interesting watches and history since 1958. They make movements and watches in a wide range of prices. However, I am told that the rights to the Beijing logo and name were recently acquired by watchmaker Fiyta (who does not make its own movements), which is itself under the government’s Aviation Industry Corporation of China. Furthermore, according to sources working with Beijing and Fiyta, this means that many Beijing movements are still being produced and used in various watches such as this Celadon Imperial, but will cease being used in Beijing-branded watches. Apparently, Beijing watches will actually use outside movements, including Swiss and Japanese ones! It’s an odd choice during a time when everyone else is bending over backwards to brag about in-house manufacturing. The Beijing website still shows that their watches use Beijing movements, though, so there’s still some uncertainty. Consumers are obviously going to be confused about what they are getting with many Chinese watches, and that’s a major problem.

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Celadon Imperial Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

Celadon Imperial Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

As Celadon develops, they are designing their own cases and other components, as well as using exclusive Beijing movements for other watch lines (currently Celestial Silk and Yue Fei). As the brand’s first watch collection, however, the Celadon Imperial has much in common with watches previously produced by Beijing, including the case and movement as well as other parts like the crown and even buckle (the buckle is signed on the inside, just like with other Beijing watches). But Celadon has opted for some more premium options and finishing than what’s usually found on the often lower-priced and more mass-produced Beijing watches. The Celadon Imperial’s case is 38mm wide in polished steel and 9mm thick, including the slightly domed sapphire crystal. The 30m water resistant case and construction are solid, and I particularly like the shape of the lugs.

Celadon Imperial Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

Celadon Imperial Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

The attractive caseback view of the hand-wound Beijing CG18 movement is a significant part of the watch’s overall appeal. The Beijing Watch Company’s simple B18 movement here is called CG18 for “Celadon Grade.” The brand tells us that this means they are produced in smaller batches with better quality control and regulation than that of the basic B18. The B18 has a stated power reserve of 42 hours, a frequency of 3Hz, and a claimed accuracy of -10/+25 seconds per day. I believe the Beijing B18 movement itself offers a date and small seconds at 6 o’clock, as can be seen on some Beijing watches, but Celadon has opted out of these for a cleaner design.

Celadon Imperial Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

With no seconds hand, it was hard to test the accuracy of the Celadon Imperial’s movement, but it seemed to be running a bit fast judging only by the minute hand’s position. The movement’s hacking feature is worth mentioning since some modern Chinese (and Japanese) movements lack it, but again, the lack of a seconds hand makes it more or less irrelevant. It’s a good-looking movement for the price, as it comes with Geneva stripes (“Chinese Scroll stripes,” Celadon says), blued screws, gold chatons, a swan neck regulator (explained further here), and the gold calligraphy engraving, which Celadon translates to: “To accomplish a momentous mission in carrying on Chinese civilization” along with something like “superlative watch” and the Celadon logo.

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  • Mikita

    Such a beautiful watch. If I was after a good looking Chinese watch – I’d not search any further. Thin, tastefully made, lovely dial pattern, blued hands and indexes, beautiful hand wound caliber, almost art deco case shapes – one of the best values below $1,000 IMO. Best of luck, Celadon.

  • Mikita
    • SuperStrapper

      Any details on the movement?

      • Playboy Johnny

        “Robust Movement Design

        The Celadon-Grade CG15 caliber powers the Watch of Heroes. A robust and reliable movement, with 48 hours power reserve, made in collaboration with Beijing Watch Factory, each CG15 has been individually inspected and regulated by the Maison Celadon Atelier.”

      • Mikita

        They call it CG15 caliber. All they say is that it has 48 hours power reserve.

        • SuperStrapper

          Cant seem to find a look at it. I wonder if it is also manually wound. That part isnt mentioned but I do see this watch will have a solid caseback so I don’t assume there would be much by way of movement decoration.

          I like the handset.

          • Mikita

            Honestly, have no idea what kind of movement is this. Initially, I assumed that it must be some kind of automatic (since it’s a sport watch) ETA2824 derived movement, but 48 hours pr made me confused. 2824 and siblings usually have 38 hours.. So may be it’s some custom order from BWAF, but judging from the price, it should be based on some of their existing movements. Anyway, BWAF is a solid maker, I believe it should perform well when properly regulated.

          • SuperStrapper

            I wonder if it is a 2824 clone and they lowered the rate to 3hz to get another 25% power

          • Mikita

            Very high chance. 2824 has dirt many clones of all kinds.

    • egznyc

      Cool. I like these Genta-esque models better than the dress watches, which suffer from short hands.

      • Mikita

        I knew you’d like the Genta-esque more than the subject of review 🙂 another choice among such style.

  • PoweredByRice

    That picture of the chop sticks holding the watch is cringe-inducing and really does lead me to believe that these watches are being marketed to Westerners in a kitschy sort of way.

    • Playboy Johnny

      It looks as if the chopsticks are being held backwards?

      • PoweredByRice

        They don’t even look like real chopsticks as both ends appear to be non-tapered. They just look like some sticks that some dude thought looked appropriate. It’s a very bad look overall….kinda gives a “World of Suzie Wong” vibe to it…

        • Playboy Johnny

          I agree.
          As a daily user of kuaizi, these did not ring true to me.

  • Rob Crenshaw

    The Chinese can do virtually exact copies of megabucks watches for $300-400, albeit with inexpensive “lipstick on a pig” movements, due mainly to cheap labor. So I was guessing the price of this watch as I read the article, and my thought was $200-300 max. Oops.

    • Knight

      They can’t do anything near ‘exact copies’…its all in the details.

      • Rob Crenshaw

        I know all about knockoffs, having disassembled them and compared them to genuine watches. For the watches that rely on precision polishing etc, you are correct, if you examine under a loupe. For much simpler watches like Panerais, or at casual distances, unless you look at the movement it’s virtually impossible to tell a fake. I stand by my statement that they can do virtually exact copies, movements aside.

        • Knight

          I don’t think you need a loupe for a $300 copy. A Parnis homage at around that price is very clearly different from Panerai even with the naked eye.

          But more to the point: if you’re saying the Celadons have worse dial and case work than 300-400 homages/copies and hence should cost less than them, well agree to disagree.

          • Rob Crenshaw

            I never agree to disagree, I just disagree. I’m not talking about a Parnis homage, I’m talking about a fake watch. I have literally handed a fake Bronzo to a Paneristi and he was not able to tell that it was fake. He could have easily if he’d flipped the watch over, but he didn’t, it was too convincing from the front that he was more interested in how the patina developed than anything else. It was $350. You’re looking at $70 fakes. The expensive ones can be exceptionally good. So please tell me exactly what fakes you have experience with, and what real watches you have compared them to.

          • Knight

            Well I can only say your Paneristi friend isn’t looking closely enough at details, although to be blunt I’ve always thought Panerai were grossly overpriced for what you get. I focus mainly on high end dress pieces and I have yet to see even a single well-executed set of hands or indices on fakes.

            Why/How would ‘fakes’ producers have access to cheaper and considerably better watchmaking than ‘homage’ producers? There must be some weird economics going on, perhaps you’d care to share your thoughts being an expert of fakes.

            Finally, with your hands on experience, it’ll be very useful to see some macro shots of ‘fakes’ vs ‘homages’ and these Celadon watches to see if your claim that the workmanship is better on fakes holds up.

          • Rob Crenshaw

            It’s not a “not looking close enough” issue, it was a test: I didn’t tell him it was fake. The point was to see if it were obvious to someone who buys these watches regularly, not whether there are differences comparing one to another with a loupe. And yes, Panerai are very overpriced and much easier to copy than say a Breguet, which would be next to impossible at sub $500 pricing. The Chinese can’t do that kind of detail work. But Rolex, Panerai, etc, they’re fine at.

            Your second q is not about quality per se, but the buyer. The buyer of an homage is looking for the cheapest solution, bc they want a watch that looks like X but will not buy a fake, it’s unethical. But there’s a whole subculture of enthusiasts making Frankenwatches out of real and cheap parts, they’re often tinkerers with a strange rationalization of what is fake. Then again, since virtually every dive watch from every manufacturer is a fake er homage Submariner, there’s a precedent.

            The fake buyer wants a watch that will pass as a (Rolex), so they’ll pay more money for higher quality. The fake guy wants as close as possible to real, and the fakes forums are filled with pix of fake vs real, look there if you want detail shots. I personally don’t understand it, many times these fakes are indistinguishable from real thru a loupe wrt small details on the front, and yet the movement is so obviously not real it’s a dead giveaway. I guess the fake buyer is all about show, and as long as the details are correct they’re happy.

            As for shots, as I said, if you’re genuinely curious then go to the fake forums and have a field day. Some are virtually perfect copies, some are abysmal. And I’m not sure I claimed the fakes have better work than the Celadon, although reading back I can see how you’d assume that. Put differently, I’m saying considering how much quality of detail you can get in a fake for $300-400, the details of the Celadon, even if at the same standard, are fewer, thus the watch should be cheaper to produce and sell.

  • IanE

    Well, they have a tough fight against, for instance, the probably better made and better looking (and certainly cheaper) Seiko Presage Cocktail range, except for buyers intent on choosing Chinese!

    • Mikita

      I like Seiko Presage as well, but, unfortunately, there is no single hand wound model.

      • egznyc

        That could be nice, if the hand-wound movement were well finished.

    • Knight

      Seiko’s Presage is truly impressive, particularly the urushi and enamel dial models which are about the same price as these. But the movements from Seiko are not as nicely decorated and quite a bit chunkier, not as ‘pure’ in the dress aesthetic (I own an enamel dial version from the lineup).

      The Cocktail dials are great but not at the same level as their urushi/enamel brothers nor these offerings from Celadon I feel. The dialwork, hands, and indices are not as well executed, and the movement decoration is a far cry from these Celadon watches.

  • Nice try, but the finishing is pretty bad. The hands and indices are particularly rough, but the edges on the movement plate, the balance wheel, the chatons…cheap-looking.

    And, yeah…really…chopsticks?

    • SuperStrapper

      I’ve been using chopsticks most of my life and those are dowels being used as chopsticks. I couldnt imagine trying to eat with sticks that big! Obviously silly marketing photo for us round-eyed devils.

      • Point taken! Obviously NOT chopsticks which, actually, makes even less sense.

    • Knight

      I’d be much obliged if you could suggest examples of watches in that price range with better finishing, macro pictures much appreciated!

        • Knight

          That’s a nicer movement than its ETA counterpart but why would you say its much better than Celadon’s? From the screws it looks like the bluing here is chemical, not heat. The striping on the rotor does look slightly better than Celadon’s, its true. In your opinion this example is far superior than Celadon?

          The hands, case, and dial work on that watch seem to be straight out of lower quality than the Celadons, closer to Seiko’s Sarb lines if not worse.

          • The hands and indices on the Celadon are awful.

          • Dimman

            Because the Celadon’s stripes look stamped, like most other cheap Chinese “striped” movements. But Cartier does that on their Clé too, so they’re in fine company.

          • Knight

            Stripes are not stamp, but you’re right that they don’t look all that great.

          • Dimman

            I would bet money that they are stamped. They are too raised where they meet edges of the plate and at the edges of the Chinese characters. Looks exactly like the stripes on a Seagull ST36 that I have, which are stamped. And looks nothing like Swiss Geneva stripes. Different technique. The pattern is probably on the die that punches the plates out.

          • Knight

            I checked with BJWAF but you could try asking them yourself. Of course, they could be lying.

        • Knight

          To my eye that’s just straight out worse finishing. The striping is coarser than the Zodiac, screws still chemically blued, and the regulator is not even polished. Am I missing something here?

          • I think the edges of the plates and bridges are more carefully done. They look like they were done with tin snips on the Celadon.

  • The color/tone difference between the hands and the hour markers is off-putting. I know the macro shots show a level of detail the naked eye won’t appreciate. But having said that, the finish of the hour markers and hands is not pleasing to look at with the magnification.

    While these watches don’t do very much for me, I’m glad to see someone in the Chinese watch industry (even if it’s driven from Singapore) taking Chinese pride and design seriously. I’ve always thought that when (not if) the Chinese finally “get” that quality control matters they should then become the kings of hand finished movements with their labor costs. Black polish, anglage, beveled wheels – all things they should be doing on movements at unheard of price points for higher end watches (or at least movements). Too bad most stuff from China is still produced with a “We give you good price” mentality.

    • Berndt Norten

      Don’t want no eeny weeny teeny teeny short, short hands.

      • egznyc

        Short hands. That was my thought, too.

        Blued hands: it was the “heat of the moment” they danced them into the fire.

        • Berndt Norten

          And now you find yourself in 82
          The blue hand watch holds no charm 4 U

          • Stuart MacKenzie

            You can’t concern yourself with bigger hands
            You catch the Chinese watch and massage the dragon’s glands

          • egznyc

            Totally fair, though I was hoping to segue into a new Seiko model based on 007 in A View to a Kill.

          • Berndt Norten

            Worst Bond ever

  • Chinese Pride.

    Names company using two French words.

    • Stuart MacKenzie

      That’s just Wong!

  • SuperStrapper

    Very strange to see a detail like screwed chatons but not see any anglage.

    • Lindsay

      I also wonder if that blue is tempered or painted.

      Nickel plating seems to be wearing off the pin buckle already.

      • SuperStrapper

        Was a first through of mine as well but they do appear to be heat treated:

        https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/b6eb57ab1428c5b6a4ff0254441055f66838479aaae8332e8e61bd03e806b50d.jpg

        Based on the unevenness of it at that zoom level anyway. Getting a soft even look through heat take a lot of skill (I.e. DeBethune) but getting a soft even look through lacquer is a lower bar to jump over.

        • Blue ion plating is even more common.

          • SuperStrapper

            That’s gotta be lowest of the low. More common in really cheap watches, not watches in general? The hands are done IP? Or the sheet is done IP and the hands are stamped from it. Would explain the hands that are blue on top but the side profile shows white metal.

          • Properly done ion plating (a form of PVD) can be very consistent and decent looking. The typical way to tell it apart from heat bluing is the tone/color difference. Ion plating (when well done) can result is a sapphire colored, highly reflective surface. Not particularly what we are seeing on this Celadon watch, but that may be more of quality and process thing than what is possible with ion plating.

          • SuperStrapper

            Isnt IP the lowest form of PVD.

            I know it can be done nicely but it’s still the drug of choice for mushroom brand Ebay watches, and for handsets it’s a fairly depressing option.

          • Not sure agree about it being a depressing option. Especially for watches under $2K USD (where it’s rare to see heat blued hands).

          • SuperStrapper

            I thought a lot of the middle market was in lacquered hands. The watches I have with blued hands that are not heat done are completed this way, not PVD.

          • Mikita

            Very few brands really do a time consuming heat bluing below $2k. Out of my head – only Stowa (Marine, Pilot, Antea).

          • SuperStrapper

            I can think of several watches under $2k that use thermally blued hands, but maybe the brand doesnt across their entire catalogue.

            Like pretty much any part, hands are sourced for many brands. Universo (a Swatch company) supplies the heat blued hands to Stowa and probably more than half of the Swiss watch industry. Something like 100 million hands a year (not all of them blued). So depending on the buying power you have or propose, you should be able to get nicely blued hands in an attainably priced watch without a lot of difficulty.

          • Knight

            The color variation that you see on the Celadons is because of small-batch hand-based heating according to the description given by the founder. There’s a difference between heat-blued using industrial ovens and heat-blued by hand.

          • SuperStrapper

            And even then there are variations, direct and indirect heat applications, as well as different ways of preparing the metal to be treated.

          • Berndt Norten

            Sometimes you’ll find your senses disjointed
            From the lines and wires
            Of salesmen cheats and liars

          • SuperStrapper

            Lowest of the low always reminds me of trainspotting.

    • Knight

      My thought exactly! Anglage would really lift these watches to the next level.

  • Playboy Johnny

    Glad to see a quality Chinese watch being made. Will explore their website.
    Hao yun!!

  • Andre Braz

    Interesting to see the growth of chinese industry with good and original designs.

  • Stuart MacKenzie
  • Farkbinder012

    Back away slowly! Run as fast as you can from this…..thing! Another halfhearted, compromised Chinese offering. In 2018 one cannot continue to give the convoluted and largely ludicrous Chinese watch industry, by western standards, a pass. If low quality and ramshackle design are your thing, indulge.

  • Raymond Wilkie

    These guys are full of themselves huh?.
    *Chinese pride”
    *Imperial”
    “To accomplish a momentous mission in carrying on Chinese civilization”
    “superlative watch”
    To be honest i think they look cheap and nasty.
    Chinese people tend to be quite small so i suppose a 38mm would look ok
    The Maserati car company might want to have a wee look at this gogo.

    • Elijs Dima (@x2eliah)

      SUPERLATIVE CHRONOMETER OFFICIALLY CERTIFIED SWISS MADE

      • Elijs Dima (@x2eliah)

        Oh, I also forgot the chapter ring’s
        ROLEX ROLEX ROLEX ROLEX ROLEX ROLEX ROLEX ROLEX

    • PoweredByRice

      “Chinese people tend to be quite small”? Please let your racial preconceptions out of this.

      And 38-39 mm is quote normal for dress watches. It’s typically sports watches that are in the 41-43mm range.

      Your post literally oozes with racial prejudice.

      • SuperStrapper

        Not to defend Ray, or even suggest he needs defending, but something is lost in translation because while he may be many things, he’s never shown a lack of inclusivity (toward humans. He’s prejudiced against like 80% of all watches).

        And to be fair, the username “PoweredByRice” oozes it’s own amount of racial stigma.

        • PoweredByRice

          I think the criticism is fair since he seems to be ridiculing the brand’s use of the term “superlative” when brands like Rolex do the exact same thing. If you’re going to try to create an elevated Chinese watch brand, doesn’t it make sense to emphasize you know….the fact that it’s a Chinese watch brand? Don’t the Swiss brands emphasize their “swiss-ness”? The implicit idea behind his criticism is that it is presumptuous for a Chinese brand to emphasize their own heritage as if that is wrong somehow.

          It’s simply a very odd critique…every brand has to start somewhere. Nobody is claiming that a 1000 dollar watch is on par with a 140000 Swiss luxury brand. And claiming that the people a country containing a quarter of all humanity is physically small is simply not true anyways.

          • ZL

            “Superlative watch” was my own translation (???), so blame me for that, but I think it’s close enough.

          • Spangles

            Sounds like you may be trying to compensate for something there.

          • PoweredByRice

            Interpret it how you like. If you want to make an argument that the OP was not engaging in racial stereotypes and then proceed to use it against me then you’re sort of proving my point.

        • Raymond Wilkie

          Up vote for the defense. Thanks

          ..mond.

      • Raymond Wilkie

        Oh for God sake!

      • Mr. Snrub

        It’s documented science: Europeans, Americans and Canadians are, on average, taller and heavier than their Asian and South American counterparts.

  • Larry Holmack

    Interesting and informative article.

    But it looks like they have a long way to go with their quality control. Maybe if the Chinese watch makers concentrated on making a quality watch that can at least be close to equal with Seiko….and stop producing cheap replicas of name brand watches…they just might have a viable watch making industry. But until then…most watch enthusiastist will not give them time of day.
    Just look a majority of the comments.

    • PoweredByRice

      Your comments are very odd, seeing as the entire premise of the article is about how this manufacturer is trying to make a watch that is NOT derivative and is being produced in extremely small quantities so as to maintain quality control.

      • Larry Holmack

        They need to try harder then.

        And I didn’t mention the tiny size of the watch…

        • PoweredByRice

          These are dress-watches, not sports watches. A Patek Calatrava is only 39mm.

          • Larry Holmack

            And if I had a normal sized wrist, and if I was a normal sized guy….that’s fine. But when you are the size of an NFL Offensive lineman….6’6″…..and have a 23 cm wrist…a 38 to 42 mm watch looks like a child’s watch on my wrist. My watches tend to be in the 46-50 mm size…and they look normal on me. Plus….I don’t have to worry about wearing a dress watch to work…I am retired and wear what I like.

          • PoweredByRice

            Well of course if you are a very large person then a 38-39mm watch isn’t going to work for you. That’s not the point. The point is that these are dress watches and most dress watches fall into the 38-39mm range. You’re basically saying that these dress watches are at fault….for being dress watches.

          • Raymond Wilkie

            With you their Larry.
            Now am going to get a racial slur comment about hand sizes.

  • ProJ

    Nice review, very mediocre dress watch.

  • The Chinese have been making parts for the Swiss for at least 30 years now. They have also become very proficient in areas of micro-machining. I’ve always felt that if they were to turn their attention to really high quality production, they could give the worldwide industry a serious challenge. So we will see what the future brings.

  • Jeffrey Chang

    That chopsticks pic tho

    • ZL

      I know it’s corny but couldn’t resist. Note I refrained from any other Chinese-themed pictures. Was really hard to hold the watch with chopsticks and take the picture, btw!

  • Marius

    Glad they chose to put the writing on the back. Other brands could learn from this.

    • Marius

      Of course what most buyers won’t realise, and I’m sure Celadon won’t mind me busting their little joke, is that the characters on the back actually say: “The foreign devil who owns this watch fellates goats.”

      • SuperStrapper

        Ok now I’m buying one.

      • Joey Wong

        You just sold me

      • Wrong: “chicken noodles” is what it says.

  • Knight

    Wonderful watches…definitely way ahead of the rest of the Chinese competition, and in my opinion much better bang for buck than most of the Swiss/German offerings in this price range.

    I don’t think there are MSRP <$1000USD featuring heat-blued hands, gold chatons, and a swan neck regulator. The nearest I can think of is Dornbluth which I also admire with better workmanship but at three times the price. The mediocre dress watch offerings from Tissot/Hamilton/Rado/Mido are yawnsville in comparison. Pedestrian in both design and movement. In the same class as Seiko's gorgeous enamel/urushi-dial Presage line.

    • egznyc

      It might not be your cup of tea but Hamilton’s Intra-matic is a beautiful, understated dress piece. If you find it boring, that is your right, of course. Further, the 2892 movement is not what I’d call pedestrian, unless you mean in the sense that it keeps very good time and fails to surprise you by suddenly running slow or fast.

      http://ablogtowatch.com/hamilton-intra-matic-38mm-watch-review/

      • Knight

        I like the workhorse ETA movements for their performance, but they are much less interesting to look at. My own beef with the Intramatic is that there’s nothing unique about it. I like the vintage appeal, but its not a very uniquely Hamilton vintage design. The sunburst dial and printed indices are quite common in fact. That’s what I meant by pedestrian, not that they are bad watches.

        Also, as a tidbit, the vintage Hamilton Intramatics are way more interesting than the modern iteration in my view! They housed a micro-rotor movement. Very cool. The movement also fit the case nicely, with the date window at its ‘correct’ place rather than being pushed toward the center of the dial because of a small movement in a large case. I have a thing against remakes that are less notable than the original, but it can’t be helped because Hamilton as a brand has truly fallen off since their hey day.

        • egznyc

          You’re right; there are definitely more interesting movements out there (though they are often in far more pricey watches). And a micro-rotor is super-cool; I’d love to have one. And as for printed indices, it works well on the watch, but truth be told I’m hoping to get a black-dialed dress piece with applied indices soon, just for a different look.

  • Estevan Villarreal

    The dial are very attractive. I was intrigued until I saw the price. For $1K I’ll take an easily serviced and reliable workhorse ETA movement from a Swatch Group, or indy brand with ETA or Miyoya like Halios. These have my interest as a novelty, but I’m not spending more than $400 USD on a lark.

  • Juan-Antonio Garcia

    What? $900 Dollars!?! Its easier to go to the Silk Market in Beijing, also known as Pirate Market, there is nothing original there, and go to the “Watch Department”, where one can get a better than original (the salesman words, not mine) Rolex or Panerai for $100 bucks, and you still paid too much, and doubt that you will see a copy Celaron, all will be originals for $20. Ouch.

    • PoweredByRice

      You’re comparing the cost of cheap knockoffs to a company that is specifically trying to make their own unique brand that is not a knock-off of anything..so you’re comparing apples to oranges.

      • SuperStrapper

        I’d say he’s more comparing a fresh turd to an apple.

        • PoweredByRice

          I guess we’ll have to wait and see….they need to establish a track record of quality for themselves first. You have to start somewhere…

      • Juan-Antonio Garcia

        A $100 bucks in China is not cheap. And for a watch carrying the Chinese pride, i did not see anything extraordinary. Only in the back some Chinese characters, that’s it? This reminds me of the (in)famous Land Wind X7, a car that also carries all the Chinese pride, and has Chinese characters too.
        https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/c275b66e94c0e5fbf5f4ffc14361d62a051973322f896f66632b6124b46e3ca4.jpg

    • Larry Holmack

      Just an FYI….they are also copying Invicta’s….!!! You can buy a knock off Invicta for more than the real thing…and it’s probably made by the same place!!!

      • SuperStrapper

        Needs moar exclamation

      • Juan-Antonio Garcia

        Thanks, but I had spent more than 5 years in that part of the world, very familiar with their trade practices.

    • Dakota Dennison

      Sha-be

      • Juan-Antonio Garcia

        Fui-lin

        • ILOW

          Lol! Can we stop embarrassing ourselves with unintelligible attempts at Chinese. While we are at it, what idiot is going to believe a Chinese street seller when they tell you the copies are better than the originals?! Are you even serious?

          • Juan-Antonio Garcia

            Of course not, did you read the comment? it was he salesman words, and in China they all say the same thing, either in Beijing or in Shenzhen, its funny.
            Also, I am not embarrassed, as I do not speak Chinese, as a matter of fact, nobody does. The official language of China is Mandarin. Cantonese is spoken mainly in the SE of China and HK, plus a lot of minor languages and dialects.
            Thirdly, I made up those words, could be “Chinese” or Hebrew or Zulu, you pick.

          • ILOW

            You must be really fun to have around at dinner parties.

          • Juan-Antonio Garcia

            Yes I am.
            Unlike others that troll the Internet to write unsolicited comments.

          • Playboy Johnny – Team Marius.

            I would attend a party you were at.

          • Juan-Antonio Garcia

            Likewise, we shall organize one and let Marius send the jet to pick us up.

          • Playboy Johnny – Team Marius.

            Awesome!!
            I would love to have a “get together”

    • Carlton_Blues

      cao ni ma

      • Juan-Antonio Garcia

        So what is your point?

        • Carlton_Blues

          cao ni ma de be

          • Juan-Antonio Garcia

            ????
            Or for idiots: T? m? de n?

  • Richard Teevan

    Hello: Great and fair review! I own an imperial Blue Celadon and love it. (60 other mechanicals including higher end (Bovet, Rolly JLC etc.) I disagree on the legibility, (i have reading glasses so suffer with the smaller stuff 😉 but one of the things that surprises me as a dress watch (versatile and casual too) at night and in low light the contrasting silver and blue dial is very clear. The Blue dial in light has a purple hue to it as well. I paired mine with a Burgundy (real croc strap and it looks great). I love microbrands and the finishing and dial justify the price. I ordered a yui fei https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/8bd679f20995a27d1191e0e92861f555940bb39dd214bf2eb71e4b219506491e.jpg as well.

  • sidney004

    I also own the Imperial Blue Celadon and have higher end watches(Rolex, JLC, GP and Omega) as well, so my opinion isn’t based solely on enlarging an internet photo and comparing the finish to a top of the line brand or repeating group-think on Chinese build quality and production practices. China is more than capable of producing quality watches and the Celadon demonstrates this; beautiful dial, excellent build quality and finish. It’s an excellent value at that price point; how many sub $1000 hand wound dress watches are out there directly competing this Celedon? I always enjoy wearing this watch and staring at the dial. I have also got the Yui Fei on order.

  • Nello Alexandri

    1k is alot for this watch. I do like the case.

  • SorrySingaporean

    I’m Chinese and Singaporean, and sorry to say this to a fellow Singaporean but this is a Chinese Invicta. Absolute bull crap.

    I’ve followed his early beginnings on WUS where his fluffy marketing was called out by many. It’s just a cheap Chinese watch pretending to be high end, appealing to clueless Caucasians. He’s hoping you can pretend by slapping this on your wrist you’ll morph into the next Han general slaying six dragons and having seven concubines. Truth is, it’s probably just one of the many watches coming from a Chinese sweatshop.

    Good luck to you white men out there who believe this is a classic piece of Chinese history. I still cringe when thinking about his marketing pitch in WUS…

    • Knight

      If you think Beijing Watch Factory is a sweatshop, I’m afraid you’re just misinformed.
      The marketing might be over the top, and there is a premium that Celadon charges over Beijing Watch Factory’s watches but it is less than you think. BJWAF watches with the B18-6 movement go for over 500usd now.

    • Skip Starnes

      It appears you may be jealous of Mr. Chee’s success. Suck it up!