Hublot Classic Fusion Skeleton Tourbillon 45mm Watches Hands-On

Hublot Classic Fusion Skeleton Tourbillon 45mm Watches Hands-On

Hublot Classic Fusion Skeleton Tourbillon 45mm Watches Hands On   hands on

This is the Hublot watch for people who don’t traditionally like Hublot. It is in the Classic Fusion collection and has a skeletonized tourbillon movement. To be honest, I sort of get a sense of glee when I post a picture of a Hublot watch on my wrist, share it on Instagram (aBlogtoWatch), and people battle over whether it is wonderful or hideous in the comments. Whether they are beauties or beasts is really not the issue, but rather that this determination is so fantastically subjective. I like to see the opinions squirm and fight.

I just learned that this will be the 50th Hublot article we will publish on aBlogtoWatch. I’ve written more unpublished articles on the brand as well as pieces on other sites. Maybe 100 in total. Even then I don’t feel as though I totally know the brand. Yesterday I visited the Hublot boutique here in Los Angeles and found three or four pieces that were totally new to me. In a sense I like not being able to keep up. The brand always has some secrets, and the opinions its shakes out of people are priceless. In a sense that is why Hublot started the Classic Fusion collection a few years ago – to offer something to people who liked the concept of Hublot but didn’t see most of their pieces living on their wrist.

Hublot Classic Fusion Skeleton Tourbillon 45mm Watches Hands On   hands on

Hublot Classic Fusion Skeleton Tourbillon 45mm Watches Hands On   hands on Hublot Classic Fusion Skeleton Tourbillon 45mm Watches Hands On   hands on

The endeavor was a success for Hublot. Finally the brand had a piece that most of its middle-aged or older retailers, distributors, and older-aged partners would and could wear. Not to mention customers… At SIHH 2013 for example I spotted an overwhelming amount of people wearing various Classic Fusion models. A 42mm wide version on a bracelet even came out this year. Most of these people would never wear a Big Bang, King Power, or otherwise thick and sporty Hublot with their indoor formal attire. It was a smart move for Hublot and it retained the brand’s thematic DNA.

So this Classic Fusion Skeleton Tourbillon is the king of the Classic Fusion family. Retail price is just shy of $100,000, though the non-tourbillon Hublot Classic Fusion skeleton models (hands-on here) are considerably less. As the king, it comes in a larger 45mm wide case (that is still rather thin at around 9mm or so thick). What you see in this article are two versions of the watch. One is the Classic Fusion Skeleton Tourbillon 45mm in titanium, and the other is in black ceramic. Both contain movements made in-house by Hublot.

Hublot Classic Fusion Skeleton Tourbillon 45mm Watches Hands On   hands on

Hublot Classic Fusion Skeleton Tourbillon 45mm Watches Hands On   hands on

The Classic Fusion collection from Hublot first came out around 2010, and we covered it here with additional details. There I talked about what the collection means, and more about the design. In a nutshell, you have a thematic return to original Hublot watches from the 1980s as well as a “classically inspired” version of the Big Bang case. Since then, the Classic Fusion has exploded with dozens of versions – more than I can keep track of. The case is elegant though futuristic and clearly masculine in its design. At 45mm, I love the size of these larger Classic Fusion models, but smaller ones are available.

Both in titanium or black ceramic, the Classic Fusion Skeletonized Tourbillon is a stunner. There isn’t the inherent showiness of gold, but these are clearly high-end items once you see the movement. The concept of them of course is very Roger Dubuis – who first innovated with using interesting polished and black surfaces to make spiderweb-like skeletonization on mechanical movements. Though, with the modern looking angles, the movement is possibly more Spiderman in style.

Hublot Classic Fusion Skeleton Tourbillon 45mm Watches Hands On   hands on

Hublot Classic Fusion Skeleton Tourbillon 45mm Watches Hands On   hands on

In terms of the movements, I must add that the titanium and ceramic Classic Fusion Skeleton Tourbillon watches have a different movement inside of each one. They look pretty much identical, but the titanium version contains the Hublot HUB6010 and the ceramic version contains the HUB1300. Both feature the time and tourbillon. Both are manually wound, and both look very much the same. So what makes them different? Size. The HUB6010 is 4mm thick while the HUB1300 is just 2.6mm thick. With that thinness, an overall thinner case profile is possible in the ceramic model. The HUB1300 also has a 90 hour power reserve while the HUB6010 has a 120 hour power reserve as there is a bit more space. Last, the HUB1300 is more efficient, being made out of 130 parts while the HUB6010 is made of 155 parts.

In typical Hublot style, the watches come on rubber and alligator straps. Meaning they have a rubber liner with alligator on the top. Given the slick black tones but accessible legibility I would personally go with the black ceramic model – but I would not turn either of them down. As a cool looking, less than ostentatious skeletonized tourbillon timepiece, these Hublot Classic Fusion models are difficult to deny. Of course the price is up there and Hublot is still settling in with its status as a high-end movement maker, but I don’t think they will have too much trouble selling these. I should not forget to add that the titanium Classic Fusion Skeleton Tourbillon ($92,000) is limited to 50 pieces, while the black ceramic model will be limited to 99 pieces ($97,700). A king gold tourbillon model of the watch will also be available as a limited edition of 50 pieces ($109,000).  hublot.com

16 comments
mercuryus
mercuryus

Love the watch!!!

Hate the price....

au bloc
au bloc

I agree with Ulysses31 on the band. It would seem more futuristic looking if the band had a cleaner size transition from the lugs to the band. And I don't like the old school black band. How about something like a carbon-fiber woven fabric to go along with the techno-look? Lastly there is something that bothers me about the mainspring. It looks too much like a windup toy, although the barrel cutouts are definitely cool.

SuperStrapper
SuperStrapper

I like, but not 'want to own' like. I just can't get into skeletonized movements like this: being able to see my wrist through a watch has never appealed to me, and I have no desire to overcome it.

Well done though, these look immaculate.

Ryan B
Ryan B

It’s a great mechanical tourbillion, no doubt about it. The ceramic like what Ulysses pointed out is a bit odd for it kind of looks like metal discoloration after being exposed to a high heat source. The hands and hour markers seem a bit too dark leaving me to think one would have to search for the time and that might get old really quick. The skeletonized movement is beautiful and I’m sure is very exciting to watch in action.

Overall, I would wear this.

adisoon
adisoon

This is my favourite Hublot. I got a chance to look at it closely and I feel in love with it. The internals of the watch are shown very well and the materials make it feel more like a tough skeleton. Definitely one on my top ten list.  

EranR
EranR

I find this watch very hard to like. The internals just aren't attractive enough to justify the skeletonization, the price paid in legibility is too high. Most importantly, the design just lacks inspiration and finesse. It's very mechanical (like most Hublot watches), and looks like the designer opened his calendar and said "oh, says here we need to do a tourbillon skeleton today, let's doodle something up". It looks a little better than the "Refined Hardware" watch everybody was mocking a few months ago - but not $100K better.

Ulysses31
Ulysses31

The "Classic Fusion" model isn't bad.  I like the skeletonisation but regardless of the maker i'm not that fond of being able to see all the way through the watch - it gives me the impression of something ephemeral, not quite "solid" enough.  The brushed finish on the front looks a little rough, so i'd go for the ceramic.  The case has what look like traditional lugs but then there's that spacer inbetween which looks weird, like someone tried to retrofit a straight-ended strap onto a normal body.  It's one of the Hublot design motifs but it doesn't really work here.  I'm not sure what colour the ceramic watch is; is it brown and greeny brown?  You say it's black but I see a variety of shades in the photos.

adisoon
adisoon

@Kris C I have a cheap skeleton watch and sometimes it bothers me when I see right through the crystal to my wrist. However, I remind myself that on the wrist 1) the watch is for telling the time primarily, 2) the watch looks cool (Other people won't normally be at the right angle to see through to your wrist anyway). I further remind myself that the skeleton watch exists for those moments when you get to take the watch off, get a loupe and peer into the dancing movement. 

Another benefit of a skeleton watch is that you will tend to learn the internal parts of the watch quite easily. When something is seen moving, it is easier to be prompted to find out what it is. Through my ownership of a skeleton watch, I have been prompted to learn such terms as balance wheel, escapement, main spring, hairspring, gear train, incabloc, and others. 

Try it, you might like it. 


Ryan B
Ryan B

@Kris C  I have hairy arms so this makes me wonder if I would be self conscious about wearing it. On Ariel's wrist it looks fine but he doesn't have arms that look like Sasquatch. Maybe I'm thinking about this too deep.

SN0WKRASH
SN0WKRASH moderator

@Ulysses31 about the photos - when I saw them in the post before it published, there was a thick yellow film on most of them, so I reposted the photos after trying to pull the yellow out - it was a smashing success for many of them, and I think the finish is reflective in these photos, so it is pulling some colors from its surroundings (especially the top photo). One photo I couldn't get the yellow (-greenish) hue out of was the one second from the bottom, so if that's the one that's throwing you off, I don't think that is what it's supposed to look like - there's a filter or the surroundings are at work

SuperStrapper
SuperStrapper

@adisoon I appreciate the comment, but must respectfully disagree. The primary function of a watch is not to tell the time. If it were, mechanical watches would be uniformly dissmissed absurdities, moreso the super expensive ones we talk about here. These are barely-useful baubles at best, let's be honest here.

Barely-useful baubles I spend way too much time (no pun intended) lusting over and spending hard-earned money on.

Ulysses31
Ulysses31

@SN0WKRASH @Ulysses31 Yeah that's the one.  Sounds like the white balance was wrong on the original photos but it can be corrected in photoshop.  Your monitor would have to have a realistic sRGB mode too - some brands (like HP) can be way off.

SuperStrapper
SuperStrapper

@adisoon woah. Sorry, but TL;DR. I think you need to make a good drink, and enjoy it.

I do see that you love skeletons, so I might suggest checking in on the Olsen twins? Just don't expect much philosophy.

adisoon
adisoon

@Kris C @adisoon 

I must clarify my comment. I agree with the point you make but that was not what I was talking about originally. 

I feel that appreciation of  a skeleton watch is best when the watch is off the wrist. The full force of the beautiful internals can be experienced when light is allowed to come through the movement, and for that you need both hands to hold the watch, manipulating it and peering through it. 

On the wrist, its a different story as a skeleton watch can only be seen from the front. While the spinning balance wheel and escapement is nice to look at, most times unless the light is at the right angle, it will be too dark to see anything properly as your wrist blocks the light from the back. 

And more importantly,.... When you compare in your mind the view of the movement off the wrist to the view of the movement on the wrist, the stark difference in what you enjoy can only mean one thing...

On the wrist, there is no point looking at the internals.... Therefore, just use it to tell the time. After all, its easier than taking out your phone!

I hope you see where I'm coming from. I Love skeletons and have spent too much time thinking about them philosophically. 

That is my cross to bear. 



SN0WKRASH
SN0WKRASH moderator

@Ulysses31@SN0WKRASHyeah - I look at it on my mac monitor (always as nice as it's ever going to look) and the two monitors I have on PCs - one is a high-end HP ZR2440w standalone monitor hooked up to a desktop box and one is an LG- I guess I can only do so much :-( But, I think Ariel is getting to be a lot better as a photographer and his camera equipment is much better now, so we're getting there :-) 

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