IWC Ingenieur Collection Expanded By Four New Models

IWC Ingenieur Collection Expanded By Four New Models

IWC Ingenieur Collection Expanded By Four New Models Watch Releases

Picture this: in 2016, you felt inclined to buy one of these strictly limited-edition-only IWC Ingenieur watches, thinking it's a one-time opportunity to get a new-old take on the Ingenieur... Well, worry not if you haven't, because IWC today is launching essentially the same watch with a few basic aesthetic tweaks along with three completely new models - a time-only, two chronograph models, and a chronograph perpetual calendar - in what is now a new IWC Ingenieur collection.

IWC Ingenieur Collection Expanded By Four New Models Watch Releases
The IWC Ingenieur Automatic 40 references IW357001, IW357002, IW357003 respectively.

As a newcomer and the entry-level model, we have the IWC Ingenieur Automatic 40 as seen above, with references IW357001, IW357002, and IW357003 starting at just under $5,000 and going up from there as you upgrade for a steel bracelet or a solid 18k red gold case. Inspired by the IWC Ingenieur reference 666, the very first Ingenieur that dates back to 1955, the silver dial version on black leather looks closest to its predecessor.

IWC Ingenieur Collection Expanded By Four New Models Watch Releases

IWC Ingenieur Collection Expanded By Four New Models Watch Releases
Two IWC Ingenieur watches from around 1955 – reference 666 on the left

It's a little-known fact that before the Ingenieur was launched in 1955 IWC had produced some military pilot watches with soft-iron cages so as to protect the movements from the ever stronger magnetic fields present in the ever-more developed and better-equipped cockpits of the 1940s. Ditching the pilot watch DNA the IWC Ingenieur was a handsome-looking dress watch designed more for - you guessed - engineers than pilots. The collection received its most notable overhaul in 1976 when Gerald Genta redesigned it – but that's a different story.

IWC Ingenieur Collection Expanded By Four New Models Watch Releases
Vintage IWC Ingenieur German flyer and catalogue excerpt from 1966, source: moeb.ch

All this was to say that things are going back to basics in the same way as we discovered with the old-new Da Vinci (hands-on here): the IWC Ingenieur Automatic 40mm, closest to the original among the four new models, offers a good conservative size (most notably the same as a Rolex Submariner) with an "IWC caliber 35111" beating inside. The 35111 is a base Sellita SW300 which in turn is an ETA 2892 clone, which helps explain some of the price difference between the Ingenieur Automatic and the Submariner. It runs at 4Hz and offers 42 hours of power reserve, ensuring that it won't be a top pick for those looking for a more modern movement in this price segment.

IWC Ingenieur Collection Expanded By Four New Models Watch Releases

IWC Ingenieur Collection Expanded By Four New Models Watch Releases
The IWC Ingenieur Chronograph references IW380802, IW380801, and IW380803, respectively.

The IWC Ingenieur Chronograph is basically the non-limited re-release of last year's limited editions – references IW380802, IW380801, and IW380803 as seen above. They are a modest 42mm wide, clad in stainless steel or 18k red gold and sport what is an ample 120m depth rating. Inside is what we're told to be an all-new movement called the IWC Caliber 69375.

IWC Ingenieur Collection Expanded By Four New Models Watch Releases

It is designed to be a relatively high-quantity-production automatic chronograph caliber with a 7750-like layout but having a column wheel replacing the cam-actuation system being the most notable difference. Operating frequency remains 4Hz, and power reserve is 46 hours so other specs are quite close to the famed workhorse chronograph caliber. Aesthetics-wise what's new about it compared to last year's limited edition is that it now has the massive and always impressive IWC winding rotor with large cutouts and beveled edges as opposed to the rather underwhelming stamped piece that was present on the 2016 models. Based on last year's comparable models expect the IWC Ingenieur Chronograph's price to start from around $7,200.

IWC Ingenieur Collection Expanded By Four New Models Watch Releases

The IWC Ingenieur Chronograph Sport is a titanium-clad, 44mm-wide alternative to the aforementioned triple-register sporting a more complex IWC Caliber 89361. It offers a more impressive 68 hours of power reserve, a more advanced automatic winding system and the more sophisticated display of chronograph hours and minutes on one sub-dial at 12 o'clock.

IWC Ingenieur Collection Expanded By Four New Models Watch Releases

A neat design detail is the lightning seconds hand at six o'clock, set as a reminder of the Ingenieur logo (and the central seconds of a Milgauss, perhaps). In this high-contrast, legible, but arguably not-so-sporty black and white, the IWC Ingenieur Chronograph Sport will be a limited run of 500 pieces – but we wouldn't be surprised to see different versions come along sooner rather than later.

IWC Ingenieur Collection Expanded By Four New Models Watch Releases

The heavy-hitter in the new-for-2017 collection is the IWC Ingenieur Perpetual Calendar Digital Date-Month, a 45mm-wide and 17.5mm-thick piece in 18k red gold, based on what is a truly impressive movement, the IWC Caliber 89800. Built on the same 89000 foundations as the Chronograph Sport, this piece further adds a perpetual calendar to the mix, spiced up with digital indications for the month and date at 2 and 10 o'clock, respectively. A neat design tweak is how the apertures are framed by what appear to be sub-dials – although the functionless tracks on their periphery might come across as a design no-no in the eyes of watch design purists.

IWC Ingenieur Collection Expanded By Four New Models Watch Releases

From the back, it does look comparable to other 89xxx chronographs, as the perpetual calendar's module has naturally been fitted onto the dial side (otherwise, you'd have all the important displays and indications way below the plane of the dial, not to mention that the chronograph bits reserve the back of the movement anyway). For now, it is available in this version with a silvery-white dial limited to 100 pieces.

IWC Ingenieur Collection Expanded By Four New Models Watch Releases

This latest extension of the round-again IWC Ingenieur collection is a sensible move unless you are one of those who picked up a limited edition last year thinking that was a rare opportunity. From the 40mm-wide automatics through the chronographs, these make for a solid core collection while the perpetual calendar continues to impress with that special movement. The IWC Ingenieur Chronograph Sport very explicitly lacks colors (most likely to not clash with the limited edition of 2016) rendering it more safe than exciting of a design. Prices for all the different IWC Ingenieur references and model variations, we will add as soon as IWC makes them available. iwc.com

What do you think?
  • Thumbs up (35)
  • Interesting (12)
  • I want it! (10)
  • I love it! (6)
  • Classy (1)
  • DanW94

    Funny, Bremont took a beating on a recent post over it’s pricing structure but here we have a totally unremarkable, mundane three hander with a base Sellita movement for approximately the same price. It’ll be interesting to see if IWC gets a pass because they’re perceived as a “storied” Swiss brand whose somehow earned the right to price gouge their customers.

    • Yan Fin

      Quod licet Iovi, non licet bovi. What is permissible for Jupiter is not permissible for a bull.

      • DanW94

        So IWC is the God and Bremont is the cattle in this scenario? Quite a stretch…

        • Garrett Hu

          To be fair, IWC is the elephant in the room with a rich history and like all brands they will leverage it. Nothing wrong with that at all but it’s watches like these that tell me I am buying 90% name and really getting a $500 watch.

    • Shawn Lavigne

      “perceived” is the operative word. in this particular market segment everything is overpriced. it’s all about perception.

      • DanW94

        Correct, it’s about individual perception. Precisely my point concerning Bremont.

        • Shawn Lavigne

          yea i guess i didn’t add anything groundbreaking.

          • DanW94

            Lol, I appreciate the validation though…..

    • A_watches

      Agreed, I prefer the bremont!

    • ??????

      I wouldn’t compare the adjustment of 2892 performed by IWC and Bremont (IWC are among the best in fine-tuning the caliber).

      • David Bredan

        I’m not so sure about that; not trying to question what you’re saying but I really can’t think of anything that would make me want to make such a claim. Irrespective of what Bremont is doing had I received any information from IWC on their adjusting of the SW300 I would’ve mentioned it but there’s nothing on their end or elsewhere (say a COSC certification) to prove that they do anything extraordinary to the Sellita.

        • ??????

          They actually do, and a lot. Lets start that IWC Caliber 35111 is made by custom, inhouse developed IWC specifications by Sellita, details marked as chronometer grade (top grade, actually even bare SW300 is a bit more advanced compared to ETA2892). As I remember, IWC changes 1. the ball bearing system to a totally unique developed by the company; 2. custom mainspring; 3. custom barrel; 4. custom anchor wheel; 5. custom anchor fork; 6. custom balance, fully, including custom balance spring; 7. some more parts. Then each caliber has to pass strict inhouse test in order to get qualified for “probus scafusia” marking. Actually, there are very few companies who make so much modifications to a base caliber (as far as I know). There was plenty of data on that, I suggest each one to do his own research and decide.

          • David Bredan

            Research, of course, I do a fair bit and feel safe in saying is one of the few things I know how to do well – but on this topic there is a lot of contradictory information online everywhere and very little to none directly from IWC themselves. Here’re three examples for you on that: 1) IWC dedicates a section to movement details on proprietary movements on their product pages, but when the watch comprises something supplied it’s not there (just the very basics, power reserve, not even operating frequency). Furthermore, there is no detailed information that I could find about the 30110/111 or 35111 at any of the product pages, movement pages, catalogues or elsewhere which, to me, indicates they aren’t too keen on sharing what in your words appear to be an impressive list of modifications. 2) Watch forum discussions (seemingly the primary source of discussions on IWC base movements) I take with a substantial pinch of salt and triple check everything before ever putting that information in any ABTW article. The most common source is usually a “rep” and I don’t consider people quoting sales reps etc a trusted source of information – if I ever get a rep as a source I only rely on the few whom I know and trust personally and ask directly. 3) To show how quickly shared information gets misquoted (even when shared with nothing but good intentions) even in your post there’s contradiction between Sellita making “custom” SW300s and you then saying these are things that “IWC changes.”

            Again, my intentions with this response is not at all to question what you’re saying but rather to highlight how difficult it is to fact check that information and the responsibility that I feel when deciding on including or excluding extremely contradictory information coming from sources we never rely on in themselves.
            I’d love for IWC to share that 70% information and all of what seems to be an impressive list of modifications as well as clarify who makes those modifications – but until they do whenever I do a quick news article I cannot do extensive several hour (or at times: multiple day) research into what a movement in one of the several models offers but rather err on the safe side of things and share with you guys what I already have in my head and know with great certainty (and will still fact check that before adding here). We have been working on making movement-dedicated articles a more common thing to do more of what we have done before and I agree base movements could be a great topic as well – will give it a priority.

            Thank you very much for your detailed response.

          • ??????

            Thanks for response! Indeed, most of such pieces of information comes from public forums, so I understand your scepticism. I’d love to see some independent and respective inside on the issue..

          • David Bredan

            Once we get it, we’ll definitely bring it to you, it’s something I’d like to learn more about as well – but you can be sure we won’t give the benefit of doubt until we know for a fact that those modifications are done. Thanks again for sharing.

          • Garrett Hu

            It’s tough to get information from IWC because there are probably some parts that are from Asian countries that they care not to disclose. In my mind however if you tell me “yes we proudly use this part from China because of these reasons” that would actually make me appreciate the transparency. I will support companies that will tell me how many of this model have you made, which one is your best seller, how many watches you make in a year and can you tell me COO of all parts you use? ….you know nothing really useful but curious and great for conversations.

          • Mike Darwin Brown

            Ariel got back up! lol

            Cheers!

          • David Bredan

            What do you mean?

          • Mike Darwin Brown

            Simply, you backed up what Ariel said earlier about Bremont in the comments! Not to offend but support!
            Cheers! lol

    • Marius

      I agree that technically, the Bremont and this IWC are similar, but in the realm of luxury products, the brand name is just as important, if not more important than the technical features. Luxury products are, first and foremost, prestige items and status symbols, and IWC has the advantage of being a prestigious brand with a 150 years-old history. You can’t just take the brand name out of the equation. If you are only interested in the features, then you don’t have to spend $4,000 on a Bremont either; you can simply buy a similar watch from the likes of Hamilton, Chr. Ward, etc., for well under $1,000.

      Furthermore, as Nikita pointed out, IWC (as well as Tudor) actually brings some important modifications to the base ETA/Sellita movements, whereas Bremont simply uses stock-standard calibers.

      • DanW94

        You can’t take the brand name out of the equation? Tell that to the people buying the Monta Oceanking.

      • Greg Dutton

        I’ve heard this claim many times, that IWC makes certain modifications to the base movement, but I’ve never seen it backed up with any evidence. Not calling foul here, just wondering if you actually have basis for that claim.

    • Behrang Farzan

      I agree. This is definitely an interesting case study in people’s perception on who is allowed to charge how much for a watch based on name alone. At the end of the day, I think that both the Bremont and these IWCs are good watches. Bremont aesthetics and design language speak more to me personally though.

      • Garrett Hu

        I agree, it’s a personal choice. We’re not limited to buy only one watch…I like the heritage and look of the IWC, but I also like the case styling and engineering of a Bremont MBII…so I got them both.

  • Chaz

    What…no more five oddly placed “rivets” on the bezel anymore? How utterly forgettable and boring…

  • IanE

    Well they look like a Kickstarter me-too placing.

  • Raymond Wilkie

    I see nothing to excite me.

    • IanE

      Yes – ‘bland’ would be generous.

    • IG

      They are for engineers not playboys.

  • Yojimbo

    doing a series of slightly different ‘limited run’ watches is a ruse for the unwary consumer

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ek6N_-O19do&feature=youtu.be&t=99

    • Shinytoys

      dig it !!

  • A_watches

    Time to kill this line and start afresh. No longer can rival any of the new omegas for antimagnetism and with no integrated bracelet, so also not a viable cheaper alternative to the Royal Oak. What’s the point..for me it has zero interesting features and design, save money and get a tag carrera instead

  • Larry Holmack

    The Blue dialed chronograph is pretty nice looking. And since my mom always taught me to say something nice or don’t say anything at all…I’ll leave it at that.

  • Chris MoJo

    I think they are ok, if a little safe. I would have liked to see entry level models with more interesting dials, something that would make them stand out from the crowd. I appreciate they are referencing the heritage but I think they could have done that whilst still creating something genuinely different.

  • Julius Swerving

    They’re OK. Not exciting. I’d prefer my 3239 or the vintage 666 models over these offerings.

    • Ron-W

      the 3239 looks better indeed, they should have used the new cal 42000 for this iteration to set it apart with an in house. Then it could also carry the ingenieur logo. Now its a little bland. The Chrono Sport looks great in black and titanium, and has the logo !

  • Norman Muller

    I bit disappointing that they chose to get rid of the Ingenieur logo on the dial… specially for the time-only version.

  • wrigduo

    They are ok, but nah…. ingenieur from 2013yr is still my grail watch…

  • Lincolnshire Poacher

    I thought the perpetual and chrono’ was a tasty looking thing. But as soon as I, very quickly, realised they were pretend sub-dials, it put me right off. It shouldn’t do, because my immediate reaction was that’s tasty. But I must be shallow, because it really does.
    The twin dial chrono looks okay too. Nothing here that’s outstanding, buts it’s all okay.

  • gw01

    IWC are resting on their laurels… no raison d’être to any of these pieces. Instead of revamping Sellitas (wtf) they might as well put in the hours to design/make their own movements.

  • God these are grim. The chronos look like Michael Kors fashion watches. IWC has lost the plot.

  • SuperStrapper

    The perpetual calendar is the only real winner here, and even at that its not so great. None of them look like Ingys.

  • Word Merchant

    Sadly, I find these all dull, and if IWC really do modify 70% of a Sellita, why not go the extra 30%? They’re a hard company to love.

  • Word Merchant

    Oh and those fake sundials? Preposterous.

    I’m done, thanks for reading.

  • TrevorXM

    They sure want a lot of money for a three hander Sellita movement watch! There really isn’t anything they really do to the movement to “modify” it except put their own rotor on it and maybe go through some fine adjustment and decoration. I don’t see any talk of a Silicon spring or any special regulator mechanism or anything — which of course they would and should publicize. IWC is lot like Bremont in this area, but with a legit heritage and cache, so they should be worth an extra five hundred to a thousand bucks a watch. A basic three hand Bremont is worth about $2 – $2.5k because of the special case and quality. A basic three hand IWC is worth about $3k. That’s based on all they bring to the table in the face of the overall market and world of watches. To be worth more you have to have an in-house movement. Period.

    The IWC Ingenieur Chronograph Sport is the only desirable watch here for me. No mention of price that I could see.

    • Garrett Hu

      Bremont will have an in house movement in the next couple of years and prices are to be maintained around the same as today. I feel if Bremont can pull off an in house movement with prices slightly higher (maybe like Tudor…something like a couple hundred bucks more) then that would seriously elevate Bremont and place them firmly against competition.

      • Word Merchant

        “Bremont will have an in house movement in the next couple of years…”

        Not a chance. They don’t have what it takes.

        • TrevorXM

          I was surprised to learn that there is actually an excellent chance: https://shar.es/1UFwpY

          • Garrett Hu

            Thanks for sharing, haven’t seen that article yet.

          • I read somewhere that Bremont recently secured six million pounds in debt financing. That alone won’t get a movement factory up and running in England. But I sure wish them luck in the process.

          • Shinytoys

            Thanks for the heads up !

        • Garrett Hu

          What does it take and how can you be so sure Bremont doesn’t have what it needs? Not being combative just want to know. I deem my sources reliable but people don’t tell me everything 🙂

      • TrevorXM

        The Supermarine model with an in-house movement at the price it is at would be a desirable watch to me.

        • Garrett Hu

          That would be sweet…with transparent case back or not?

          • TrevorXM

            I’d like them to keep what they’ve got with regards to the anti-magnetic soft iron core and the anti-shock stuff — that and the unique case are their selling points and need to go together with the in-house movement so they’d have a complete package. And I’d like to see the rendering of the Supermarine aircraft which inspired the watch on the back — preferably the side view. So don’t change anything, just add a really good in-house movement and keep the price the same. That would be a winner. And highly unique to see it made in England, movement and all. Even Christopher Ward makes their movement in Switzerland.

  • IG

    Solid clean designs for the 3-handers and the Sport chronograph.

  • Mike Darwin Brown
    • The Deplorable Boogur T. Wang

      I see what you did there….(golf clap)

  • Mike Darwin Brown

    Here is my other Bremont and IWC…lol Who cares; buy what you want! https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/adf7f0485d7c5b92cb8cbdf39e84fd24e0e002baef9b1ad1eb735689f9ef05de.jpg

  • WINKS

    Long gone are the days when IWC was trying to compete with Rolex by offering unique, quality alternatives at competitive prices. These watches are so forgettable by their blandness… painful

  • Kuroji

    You’ll notice none of this pictures show the watch from the side. That is no accident. They are far too bulky.

  • DG

    Big swing and miss here. Zero character and a high price, not a good combo.

  • Mr. Snrub

    Much prefer the Genta version.

  • Ulysses31

    Safe, handsome enough design but as is often the case with IWC, whatever watch is on display next to it catches my eye more. I don’t want to pay a huge chunk of money for “safe”. If I want that kind of design many better-value brands have you covered. The three-handers look like they borrowed the hands and dial from a Seiko 5. The bezels are too thick as well.

  • Richard Baptist

    The black chrono with the lightening seconds hand. That’s it.