Ulysse Nardin Skeleton Tourbillon Manufacture Watch Hands-On

Ulysse Nardin Skeleton Tourbillon Manufacture Watch Hands-On

Ulysse Nardin Skeleton Tourbillon Manufacture Watch Hands On   hands on

Out of the many watch brands we visited at Baselworld 2013, Ulysse Nardin stood out as having one of the most impressive and rich assortment of new watches. Among those, were wild new Freak watches (two of them), a new in-house made chronograph movement (and watches to put them in), as well as this new limited edition Skeleton Tourbillon that also has a totally in-house made movement. "Skeleton" and "tourbillon" are two terms that seem to go particularly well together when it comes to timepieces. Mix being able to see the guts of a movement, with a movement you want to see... and oftentimes you have a recipe for success.

Ulysse Nardin will produce two versions of this limited edition watch in ritzy 18k rose gold as well as pricier platinum. Lower-budget watch lovers really get nothing even close to this stuff, especially when it comes to marvelous skeletonized movements. It is as if you have to choose between a $100,000 plus Swiss masterpiece with a tourbillon... or a $100 Chinese-made watch you want to hide from people who may know better. Actually, if you want a budget skeletonized movement you can look for something with a cut-up UNITAS in it, but stuff like the Ulysse Nardin Skeleton Tourbillon are in a totally different league.

Ulysse Nardin Skeleton Tourbillon Manufacture Watch Hands On   hands on

Ulysse Nardin Skeleton Tourbillon Manufacture Watch Hands On   hands on

For Ulysse Nardin this watch is a first. Not their first in-house made movement of course, nor their first tourbillon, but rather their first in-house made skeletonized tourbillon. The movement was designed from the ground up to be skeletonized - meaning that Ulysse Nardin didn't just skeletonize an existing movement. The new movement is the caliber UN-170 and it has an impressive power reserve of 170 hours. No power reserve indicator unfortunately, but that is a long time. So with a more or less week long power reserve you can just remember to wind your Skeleton Tourbillon Manufacture watch each Sunday night. In fact, Ulysse Nardin did something clever with regards to this. The mainspring barrel is engraved to say "170 Hours Power Reserve." This is important because it allows you to recall at anytime how much power the watch has. Most people will either forget or never be told the power reserve length when they get a watch. So Ulysse Nardin is making sure that years from now you will recall this fact.

At the 6 o'clock position we have a tourbillon, and I mean really at the 6 o'clock indicator. This movement is large enough to fill up most of the 44mm wide case. The tourbillon is further a flying tourbillon, meaning that is has no connected top bridge. In addition to that, Ulysse Nardin has included a silicon escapement - which isn't surprising given that they were a silicon watch part pioneer, and own a company that makes silicon parts. I love the bridge work on the movement, especially in terms of their design, and the brushed surface with polished beveled edges. The design is modern, but deeply respectful to the look of antique pocket watch movements.

Ulysse Nardin Skeleton Tourbillon Manufacture Watch Hands On   hands on

12 comments
wstephens1
wstephens1

I have always wanted a skeleton watch or as a matter of fact any Ulysee Nardin watch. Hurry up lottery I only have so many years left.

tresd
tresd

That is a stunning watch.  Then again, pretty much everything put out by Ulysse Nardin is great looking.

Ryan B
Ryan B

It's so beautiful, these guys are damn good at what they do

Frauss
Frauss

A really magnificent watch and not all that expensive. I expected twice the price.

MarkCarson
MarkCarson

Fabulous - which of my children do I have to sell to get one?

You know, I wonder why no brand has yet to use two polarized films applied to the inner surfaces of the top and bottom crystals (but set at 90 degrees to each other) so that you can see into the movement from either side and not be able to see all of the way through to your wrist hairs?

Ruutzy
Ruutzy

@MarkCarson it is a neat idea but I would worry that the first customer out the door that attempts to read the dial through their polarized sunglasses might complain.

SuperStrapper
SuperStrapper

@MarkCarson bottle that, you'll make a fortune on it.

To say that this watch is not beautiful would be a complete lie, but I will never want to see my wrist through my watch. Cool for some, but I don't subscribe.

MarkCarson
MarkCarson

@Ruutzy Good point. Perhaps the top polarizing layer would have to be below the hands so you could always read the time (and the hours are on the flange so no worries there).

Ruutzy
Ruutzy

@MarkCarson One more thought, honest! Maybe you could put the polarizing layers on the rear bezel with a slider on one side so that you can look through the movement with the watch removed but when wearing it you could hide your wrist.

Ruutzy
Ruutzy

@MarkCarson @Ruutzy In honesty I would still put it in the top crystal and just inform people. Less layers to look through means less glare and ghosting (by that I mean that duplicate effect you get when you put something up to a triple pane window). I really think you have a good idea there! 

Possibly you could put the polarization on with a rotating bezel and a fixed layer directly below so you could 'dim' your watch in bright sunlight, not unlike some jet aircraft windows.