Updated Breitling Superocean Heritage II Watches With Tudor-Developed Movement

Updated Breitling Superocean Heritage II Watches With Tudor-Developed Movement

Updated Breitling Superocean Heritage II Watches With Tudor-Developed Movement Watch Releases

The Breitling Superocean Heritage is a classic diver's watch that's now celebrating its 70th anniversary with a slight design refresh and a brand-new movement developed with Tudor watches. The new Breitling caliber B20 is derived from the Tudor Caliber MT5612 used in their Black Bay watches, among others. In fact, Tudor's new Black Bay chronograph borrows from the Breitling B01 caliber as part of what I call their "movement exchange program" this year. Like the previous version, the Breitling Superocean Heritage II collection will include a 42mm and 46mm three-hand automatic with date as well as a 46mm automatic chronograph.

Updated Breitling Superocean Heritage II Watches With Tudor-Developed Movement Watch Releases

Initially released in 1957, the Breitling Superocean is still going strong in many sizes, colors, and configurations. In addition to their modern, sportier Superocean collection, Breitling smartly released the vintage-inspired Superocean Heritage collection a few years back.

Updated Breitling Superocean Heritage II Watches With Tudor-Developed Movement Watch Releases
Outgoing Superocean Heritage

Updated Breitling Superocean Heritage II Watches With Tudor-Developed Movement Watch Releases

Aesthetic changes are pretty discreet, with a new ceramic ring around the minute track replacing the old steel one, allowing for the color to match the dial in a seamless look. It's actually pretty noticeable when compared with an older model, as you can see above. It's minor but a refinement that definitely brings a higher-end look. Also, for those who look closely, the minute hand is now slightly more sword-shaped, and the hour hand now has a steel partition in the lume in the arrow’s head.

Updated Breitling Superocean Heritage II Watches With Tudor-Developed Movement Watch Releases

Updated Breitling Superocean Heritage II Watches With Tudor-Developed Movement Watch Releases

Of course, the major new change for the three-handers is the new B20 movement, a self-winding, 28-jewel caliber which vibrates at 28,800bph. It is Breitling's take on the Tudor MT5612 movement which provides a solid 70-hour power reserve. It's clear that both brands are benefitting from each other's "specialties," with the Tudor three-hand movement applied here, which would likely drive the cost up considerably if Breitling were to develop it themselves, and Tudor adaping the Breitling B01 movement (not the one used in the Breitling Superocean Heritage II chronograph, mind you).

Updated Breitling Superocean Heritage II Watches With Tudor-Developed Movement Watch Releases

Updated Breitling Superocean Heritage II Watches With Tudor-Developed Movement Watch Releases

The 46mm Breitling Superocean Heritage II Chronograph also sports some subtle upgrades and alterations. Like its three-hand siblings, the chronograph now has a ceramic bezel and the same slight changes to the handset. The Breitling Superocean Heritage II Chronograph features the trusty old caliber B13, which is based off the Valjoux 7750. The automatic movement operates at 28,800vph and has a power reserve of around 42 hours.

Updated Breitling Superocean Heritage II Watches With Tudor-Developed Movement Watch Releases

Updated Breitling Superocean Heritage II Watches With Tudor-Developed Movement Watch Releases

The new Breitling Superocean Heritage II collection is a subtle upgrade in terms of aesthetics with the three-handers reflecting the increased value and interest among buyers in the origin of a watch’s movement. The new Breitling Superocean Heritage II will come in a variety of dial colors (in this case, Volcano Black, Gun Blue, and Stratus Silver) and with a huge variety of straps like leather, crocodile leather, the rubber Aero Classic or Ocean Racer, or the new rubber-leather Ocean Classic. The chronograph will be available with either a Volcano Black, Mariner Blue, or Copperhead Bronze dial, and customers will be able to choose between leather, crocodile leather, the rubber Aero Classic or Ocean Racer, or the new rubber-leather Ocean Classic straps.

Price for the Breitling Superocean Heritage II 42mm will be $4,075 on a rubber strap, $4,500 on leather, and $4,700 on bracelet. The 46mm three-hander will start at a price of $4,375 on a rubber strap, $4,500 on leather, and $4,700 on a bracelet. The Superocean Heritage II Chronograph 46 will be priced from $5,415 on a rubber strap, $5,840 on leather, and $6,040 on a bracelet. breitling.com

What do you think?
  • I want it! (76)
  • Interesting (44)
  • Thumbs up (23)
  • I love it! (21)
  • Classy (12)
  • Except for the new hands, this is probably my favorite Breitling three-hander!

  • Raymond Wilkie

    3 hander , blue, mesh please.

    • Ditto. In 42mm. Maybe we can get a group discount.

      • BNABOD

        I am in

  • SuperStrapper

    A nice update, but I’m confused why they would take a 7750 off the shelf for this when they make their own, technically superior chronograph movements.

  • Sevenmack

    Those Superocean Heritages are sex on the wrist! Especially the bezels, which are sophisticated and well-refined compared to other divers, and the handsets (which match the watches well). Love them!

  • Matthew Rowe

    They just couldn’t resist the date window, could they…

    • Sevenmack

      The casual watch buyer demands a date window. Just as importantly: Time includes knowing the date. Ultimately, the date window is just fine to me. But you are entitled to your preferences.

      • Matthew Rowe

        I’ve got no problem with them, but on a vintage reissue, leave it off or at least present the option of no date.

        • Sevenmack

          But why? Just because it is a reissue doesn’t mean it has to be faithful to the original in every way. That is an illogical way of thinking about these things. A reissue should bring the essence of the original watch while also adapting to modern demands. [Of course, given that the SOH is a regular line now, it really isn’t a reissue anymore. But that’s a digression.]

          The original Superocean didn’t have a date complication for two reasons. The first is because those complications weren’t widely available; they only debuted in 1945 (or a decade before the original Superocean) with the Rolex Datejust. Most watches still didn’t have them until the 1960s because watchmakers were developing their own versions and trying to produce them at cost-effective levels. The second reason is because the Superocean was a dive watch meant for professional divers; it took a while before divers became the watch of choice for everyday wear among casual watch buyers.

          Those times have changed. Today, a watchmaker can cost-effectively provide a date complication that casual buyers demand. Dive watches have long ago been replaced by dive computers, and therefore, are daily wear watches that can also be worn in formal and semi-formal occasions. Additionally, thanks to the Quartz Revolution, Swiss watchmakers have refined what used to be “tool”, “sports”, and “dive” watches so they can be worn at every occasion. A date window is part of that refinement, even if you don’t want it to be.

          Honestly, the only reason why many collectors hate date windows, especially on reissues (which is a questionable status to put the SOH in because it is a regularly-produced line these days) is because they own more watches than casual watch buyers. If we owned fewer watches, we would care less about date windows we have to set.

          • Juan-Antonio Garcia

            I’ll be brief, I am not a collector, but date windows are ugly. In most watches they somewhat look like an after thought, or breaks the design.

          • Mark1884

            I do not mind the date windows. It is the magnification bubble or cyclops bubble that I have come to dislike.

  • Mark1884

    Beautiful in blue!! These SOH’s are really elegant & classy.
    Not sure what to make of the Breitling/Tudor alliance. I like Tudor also, so it’s all good.
    I must have the 3 hander in blue, on the mesh.

  • The Blue One. The Blue One. Looks like I’m mesmerized…

  • BNABOD

    Lovely blue but how thick is it?

  • Juan-Antonio Garcia

    Very nice, nothing to add.

  • Framlucasse

    Nice watches but in 46mm, it’s ridiculous… 42 is quite big already. It should have been 40/44mm.

  • BRIAN

    When are we going to stop getting these HUGE watches. 38-42max.

    • Mark1884

      I agree! 40-41 is perfect. (imo)

  • Michael Robinson

    Nice updates. Shame the addition of the tudor movement increases the thickness. Still waiting for a 40mm version. Not holding my breath though.

    • Gleb Kuzmin

      There is no stop for enormous watch madness. It seems they rather release 52mm version, than 40mm.
      Even Rolex went for 43mm this year. Dunno who is the buyer of such sizes, maybe Stallone, Robocop and Terminator.

  • Ulysses31

    These are probably the most classy and beautiful watches Breitling makes, and the only timepiece of theirs i’d ever want to own. A glance at this thing will always put a smile on my face.

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  • Shinyitis

    Breitling pulling out the stops with this range so they have my interest again. The jutting lugs might favour flatter or larger wrists given the sizes; the symmetrical 3 hander date is nice in either blue or black – no questions, would wear!

  • MediumRB

    42mm on shark mesh bracelet in blue for me. I’ll wait for it at $3500.

  • Azhigaliyev Maksat

    Can you please explain to me: Why does Breitling Superocean has one dial with Swiss made written on and another dial where Swiss Made isn’t written? is there some kind of meaning to this?

    • Brian Valta

      The first dial is the previous Heritage model, the second dial with the Swiss Made is the new updated Heritage II version. However, given that I sell Breitling for a living I can confirm that the previous models also include the Swiss Made label on the dial so this must be an old stock image. Regardless of that, Breitling doesn’t always include the Swiss Made label on their dials. It is not mandatory/required and is pretty much optional for the company to include it or not, sometimes they will opt out for some models to minimize the clutter on the dial. Regardless, all Breitling’s are 100% Swiss Made regardless of the ‘swiss made’ label present or not.

  • Han Cnx

    Hmmm… why would anyone make a dive watch with timing bezel, but then don’t add any kind of numbers or other indication to actually know how much time has elapsed?

    It seems like it was designed by someone who just wanted to draw a pretty watch or a faux-diver / fashion diver, because it fails in a couple other really obvious ways. (For example, no lume on the seconds hand (serves as an indication that the watch is running), and also the hour marker lume dots are absolutely tiny.

    It reminds me of a Vostok more than anything else. (Which suffers from some of the same problems, however it costs one hundred times less.)

    http://i.imgur.com/k3GNnS2.jpg

  • Mark

    Just one question: how is Breitling celebrating it’s 70th anniversary by updating a 60 year old watch?

    • Alvaro Carneiro

      Updating a 60 year old watch.

  • disqus_a3XKDhBu6g

    In May 2017, I purchased from an official Breitling retailer a new Super Ocean Heritage 42. The watch looked great. When I got it home, I noticed that the hour hand did not align with the hour markers. The minute hand had to go anywhere from 5 minutes to 15 minutes past the hour to bet aligned. I requested a return to have this fixed, and when I received my watch back, it, a brand new watch had been serviced but nothing done to fix the issue. I called and eventually got the customer service manager, who stated several times that this was within specification. I requested a conversation with the US President, who I was told does not speak to customers. So I wrote the CEO in Switzerland a letter. The next day, I received a call from the same customer service manager who requested the watch be returned. I then took pictures of watch at all 12 positions and highlighted the discrepancies. After another week plus, I received an email back stating that it had been fixed, so I authorized the return as long as all positions had been fixed. Needless to say, there were still two positions visibly out of alignment. Upon notifying this same manager again, I was told that this met Breitling spec. A watch that is a chronometer is out by over 5 minutes does not seem worth the reputation that this company has, and their lack of empathy is industry leading.