back to top

Urwerk UR-110 Eastwood Watch With Ebony Wood Bezel Hands-On

Urwerk UR-110 Eastwood Watch With Ebony Wood Bezel Hands-On Hands-On

The Urwerk UR-110 Eastwood is the latest – and reportedly final – iteration of the award-winning UR-110 “Torpedo,” which turned heads and blew minds when aBlogtoWatch first wrapped it around our wrists back in 2011. Thankfully, the Swiss horological wizards at Urwerk are giving the UR-110 a proper send-off with two exclusive limited-editions marrying titanium industrial design, exotic wood, and British tweed, yielding a natural, texture-rich combination that borders on “vintage” and admittedly works far better than it should. Sure, true to Urwerk form, it still looks like it fell out of the cockpit of a spaceship, only this spaceship has a wood grain dashboard, horizontal speedometer, and a braided leather control column.

Urwerk UR-110 Eastwood Watch With Ebony Wood Bezel Hands-On Hands-On

Urwerk UR-110 Eastwood Watch With Ebony Wood Bezel Hands-On Hands-On

The Urwerk UR-110 Eastwood marks the return of Urwerk’s radical asymmetrical case design (the same Ariel once called “a mutated ninja star,” even though it clearly looks like a wrist-mounted grappling hook launcher, but that’s probably beside the point), and again employs the same orbiting satellite complication whose arrow-shaped torpedoes display the time on the 3:00 side of the case, as opposed to 6:00 in the symmetrical 105 and 210 series editions. The dial layout is also entirely unchanged from the 110’s other editions, meaning the AM/PM and “Oil Change” indicators – the latter of which, of course, represents Urwerk’s service interval language – are both present. Flip the watch over, and you’ll see the familiar dual turbines which are linked to the automatic winding and are visible through two circular apertures for that added show.

Urwerk UR-110 Eastwood Watch With Ebony Wood Bezel Hands-On Hands-On

Urwerk UR-110 Eastwood Watch With Ebony Wood Bezel Hands-On Hands-On

As mentioned, the Urwerk UR-110 Eastwood is the final iteration of the 110 series, and for this swan song, Urwerk reached into its deep bag of fabrication tricks for an unusual choice of material: wood. But since this is to be used on a watch more inspired by space-age design than traditional horology, it’s not just any wood. The Urwerk UR-110 Eastwood is available in two editions of only fifty-five pieces each; one with a polished Red Ebony faceplate, and the other with a faceplate hewn from Macassar Ebony – a dense, streaky, dark brown-colored wood that has been a woodworkers’ favorite for centuries.

Urwerk UR-110 Eastwood Watch With Ebony Wood Bezel Hands-On Hands-On

Urwerk UR-110 Eastwood Watch With Ebony Wood Bezel Hands-On Hands-On

While the Red Ebony gives off an odd burnt orange hue, the Macassar Ebony with its rich, earthy tones looks exceptionally cool against the matte gray titanium case – I’d even go so far as to say this is definitely the more “powerful” looking version of the two. However, those with deep pockets and indecisive proclivities can rest easy knowing the bezel plates should be relatively easy to replace, with the removing of Urwerk’s signature chamfered screws.

Urwerk UR-110 Eastwood Watch With Ebony Wood Bezel Hands-On Hands-On

Urwerk UR-110 Eastwood Watch With Ebony Wood Bezel Hands-On Hands-On

But perhaps most interesting about Urwerk’s choice to use wood, beyond the goal of *ahem* “nailing” a certain classical aesthetic, was the added challenge of working with ebony itself, which happens to be as difficult as certain types of steel to machine. In fact, according to Urwerk co-founder Felix Baumgartner, machining the plates wore out drill bits as if they were machining steel. Laying the Urwerk UR-110 Eastwood on its side probably exhibits this craftsmanship the best, as the faceplate carries a gentle, uniform curve from end to end, neatly matching the curvature of the panoramic sapphire crystal.

Advertisement

Urwerk UR-110 Eastwood Watch With Ebony Wood Bezel Hands-On Hands-On

Urwerk UR-110 Eastwood Watch With Ebony Wood Bezel Hands-On Hands-On

Like the past editions of the Urwerk UR-110 we’ve seen (including editions dating all the way back to 2011), the Urwerk UR-110 Eastwood is powered by Urwerk’s UR-9.01 self-winding movement, meaning any differences with the Eastwood edition are entirely cosmetic. That is pretty much OK, though, as the rotating satellite torpedoes are no less impressive today than they were five years ago – fascinating and novel concepts that age as well as the time indication system in Urwerk’s watches are few and far between. So while the overall “wow” factor of the watch is somewhat diminished in the use of this same movement when compared to other Urwerk UR-110s, it’s also a welcome familiarity that allows the new materials and textures to shine here.

Urwerk UR-110 Eastwood Watch With Ebony Wood Bezel Hands-On Hands-On

There’s no denying that the vintage redux continues to be the hottest thing in watchmaking right now. Even Urwerk’s hyper-futuristic design language couldn’t resist taking out a slice of yesteryear’s trends; except, rather than go full-steampunk, designer Martin Frei took a more conservative route with the wood faceplates, and matched them with a series of bespoke wool tweed straps made in collaboration with renowned Savile Row tailor Timothy Everest. Of course, leather has long been the strap material of choice for Urwerk – apart from this genuinely impressive-looking steel bracelet version of the UR-210s (hands-on here) – but the added color subtleties and natural textures of the tweed help in camouflaging the watch’s presence on the wrist and diffusing the sheer complexity of the dial. Rest assured, this is a good thing; it might even be welcome news for those who’ve long been hesitant to join the Urwerk owners’ club and were looking for an Urwerk with a bit less spaceship and more country club vibe to it.

Urwerk UR-110 Eastwood Watch With Ebony Wood Bezel Hands-On Hands-On

Urwerk UR-110 Eastwood Watch With Ebony Wood Bezel Hands-On Hands-On

Each of the Eastwood editions will come with three interchangeable straps color-matched to their respective faceplate, including this brown and blue pattern on ivory fabric (better known as the original Prince of Wales check worn by the Duke of Windsor), which neatly matches the lighter colored Red Ebony faceplate.

Urwerk UR-110 Eastwood Watch With Ebony Wood Bezel Hands-On Hands-On

Before the Urwerk UR-110 Eastwood, the challenge of wearing an Urwerk wasn’t just limited to the cost of entry. The challenge was overcoming not only the dimensions, but perhaps the practicality and unusual aesthetics of the device itself – which could at times be difficult to wear with anything other than a Batsuit, lest it completely overwhelm your wrist. However, thanks to the natural hues of the ebony faceplates and the textured contrasting straps, this is arguably Urwerk’s most wearable execution currently available, and a watch that could easily be imagined sitting naturally — and regularly — against the cuff of a chambray or oxford shirt. That said, you’ll still have to get past the titanium case’s 47mm diameter and 51mm lug distance; a long shot for all but the most assertive wrists.

Urwerk UR-110 Eastwood Watch With Ebony Wood Bezel Hands-On Hands-On

Does that mean we finally have an Urwerk that’s not just reserved for Bruce Wayne? Perhaps. However, you’ll still probably need his checkbook. The Urwerk UR-110 Eastwood will set you back right around $105,000. urwerk.com

Read more about

Watch Brands

Explore

Comments

Disqus Debug thread_id: 4482026556

  • Boogur T. Wang

    “…turned heads and blew minds…”, of course you are referring to the $105k price tag pinned, hopefully, onto this piece.
    A watch made for Sylvester Stallone if I ever saw one.
    (and I mean that as a compliment Sly)

  • IanE

    Urwerk meets Ralph Lauren – I couldn’t (and wouldn’t) have made it up. To my eyes, it looks like a high-tech loo seat – and those straps are hideous.

  • I have reservations about the durability of wood on the exterior of any watch and I don’t care for the tweed straps. But otherwise, I like it a lot. Now if they just covered the wood with sapphire it might be just right and would justify the price too.

    • As I have not seen the earlier incantation of this watch it took me a little while to figure out how the hour indicators worked. I finally saw they are all connected to a rotating device at the center of them. Very clever as I am sure the mechanism that rotates the hours is as well.

      That has to be the clunkiest thing I’ve ever posted. Please forgive me.

      Cheers!

  • word-merchant

    Ah more limited editions. That’s what we need. Even if I could afford this without having to sell my house, I’d help it stay truly limited by not going near it.

  • Ulysses31

    It’s Urwerk – hard not to like even with a strap made from grandpa’s old jacket. While it’s true the wooden components are not durable (and it kinda spoils the slick industrial vibe you normally get from an Urwerk) it looks pretty decent. There are harder woods out there than ebony – it might have been more appropriate to use one of those. Yes, ebony is luxurious but it’s also over-used. How about Quebracho, which is apparently the hardest wood in the world.

    • As they were saying they were dulling their bits working with the ebony, the Quebrancho would probably destroy the bits and the shaft.

      Cheers!

  • iamcalledryan

    LOVE

  • Raymond Wilkie

    It’s just not me, and the strap is horrendous

    • Nah… not horrendous… just really ugly.

  • You lost me at the “oil change” applique. That is literally the stupidest thing I’ve ever seen on a watch. That would make a good article, ABW – “Worst design decisions of the past decade”.

    • iamcalledryan

      It is basically a 5 year movement life indicator. Without the indicator you tend to count the months since you bought the watch before taking it in for service, with this one you can factor in all of the idle time that the lubricant and gears aren’t being messed with. And considering that the main service step is to change the lube, it’s not an absurd label.

      URWERK specialize in creating interactive complications, I like the idea of gauging the true age of your movement.

  • BNABOD

    I am not sure the “whoa factor” is what I would say here, more like huh NO. the strap looks like it was made from old wool sweaters my grand mother loved to dispense at Christmas. thanks for recycling them. All around 105K for this seems like money well spent………

  • Dinkee, H. O.

    I have been strongly considering one of these and almost bought one on impulse. It’s the wooden bezel that worked its magic on me, what with my close personal friend Ralph Lauren’s wooden bezel watches redefining what a watch could be. I have a full 5 1/4 inch wrist and it did wear a tad big, but certainly still wearable. I wouldn’t recommend it for the numerous frequent commenters on this board who have thinner wrists than mine, however!

    The HO

    • Mark Baran

      LMAO 🙂

  • DanW94

    This one’s not to my liking but I applaud Urwerk for pushing design boundaries. The tweed strap however, is the perfect compliment to the wooden bezel. If you going to step outside the box go all the way….

  • Ryan B.

    They should have done it in walnut

  • Marius

    FINALLY! I say FINALLY, a watch with a wooden bezel!
    It appears that the hard work of Ralph Lauren has not been in vain. Even Woody Woodpecker would be proud of this watch.

    Marius
    Vice Official Horologist for President Trump

    • iamcalledryan

      First, this was released in January 2015, so your faux-gushing is a year late.

      Second, it’s not a calendar month counter. I wonder how many people experience problems counting the accumulated months of autonomy that their watches have run over a five year period…probably most.

      Third, the sarcasm directed at people who are passionate about watches is funnier when that other guy does it – and his singular joke is running thinner than his purported wrist size.

      • Marius

        Its very simple: you look at the date of purchase, or at the date the watch was last serviced and then see when five years passed. Probably the movement won`t suffer irreparable damages if you service the watch after five years and two months.

        • iamcalledryan

          You miss the point. It’s not about sending it too late. it’s about sending it too early.

          If you don’t use the watch it doesn’t accumulate the effects of wear. The standard 5 year interval is based on frequent use, the oil change function is more accurate in that it excludes inactive time. Ergo this is a movement life counter not a month counter.

          That’s to say nothing of the benefit that this brings in the pre-owned market. You can’t fake the last service record with this indicator.

          I’m also told you can count days instead of having a calendar function on your watch…

          • Marius

            The effects of wear apply mostly to the parts that wear out faster if the watch is often used. However, the oil change indicator dosn`t refer to how worn out the parts are, but, as the name implies, refers to the oil level which can deteriorate even if the watch is seldomly used. Synthetic oil loses its properties after a certain interval, even if you don`t wear your watch at all.
            How many super complicated watches from Patek, Lange, or Greube&Forsey sport this important indicator? None. If a Patek Split-Seconds chrono, or a Greubel&Forsey Quadruple Tourbillon work just fine without an oil change gauge, my guess is we can live safely without it.

          • iamcalledryan

            No, you are describing an OIL GAUGE, ie something that gives a reading of oil levels.

            The complication in question is an OIL CHANGE indicator. Oil change is a play on cars but refers to the need to change lubricant, not how much oil is in the watch!

            Not sure that something has to exist on a Patek, Lange or GF to qualify it. It’s you requiring it to be an “important” indicator. I don’t think it’s more important than most other complications. We are not here for life-saving importance.

          • Marius

            OK, its a service interval indicator. The wear of a movement consits of two parts: the caliber components that wear out due to use, and the oil which degrades after a certain time.
            Does this indicator take into consideration both aspects? How does this indicator check both the wear of parts and the viscosity of the oil. How can it mechanically check both aspects? Does it have a mechanical sensor that accomplishes that? What level of precision can it achieve? Has Urwerk shown tests clearly proving that this system has actual benefits?

            If this oil change indicator isn`t super precise, my solution is, yet again, very simple: if the reccommended service interval is five years, and you don`t use your watch very often, simply bring it in for servicing later. I mean, its not rocket science.

          • iamcalledryan

            Of course the thing doesn’t perform a test of your oil viscosity. Just as a chronometer doesn’t check itself against an atomic clock, mechanical watches are limited by their mechanics – what makes the service interval indicator function irrelevant over any other complication? Such odd logic. A second timezone is just as easy to work out by adding or subtracting the hour in your head – so a dual time is a pointless complication?

            It is simply a 5 year track of your movement life, NOT THE SAME THING as counting the months since you bought the thing. You don’t have to love it, but it has nothing to do with people not being able to count months.

            Yes, you can refer to your last service receipt, but you can also refer to the dial of the watch for a more sensitive piece of information than a receipt date sitting somewhere in a desk drawer. That’s the whole point. It doesn’t save lives, it doesn’t replace the assessment of a watchmaker, it just keeps you informed.

            Oil change = service. While lube can age, it degrades FAR sooner due to its use than sitting in a sealed case. So long as you wear the thing occasionally, your service trigger will be based on wear and not on oil decay. Correct, if you find this watch in an attic in 50 years, you can ignore the oil change and get it serviced right away.

          • Marius

            There are two types of mechanical complicatons: relatively accurate ones and useless gimmicks.
            A mechanical chronograph is not as accurate as an atomic clock, but it can still be a pretty precise mechanism, especially if you look at watches such as the El Primero Striking 10, or the Tag Microgirders, or whatever their called. Their performances can be measured and compared.

            Complications such as the Urwerk service indicator are useless gimmicks. A mechanical movement is too complex to be evaluated by a simple indicator, and Urwerk hasn’t presented any proof showing that their indicator actually has acceptable results. I mean, a chronograph can be tested and the results can show how accurate it is. On the other hand, Urwerk has neither explained how their service indicator works, nor have they tested it and shown that it has an even minimal level of accuracy.

          • iamcalledryan

            You can go ahead and drop things into those two buckets but they are your own subjective buckets. Believe it or not some people derive value from functions that you do not. Even with your one example – who cares about 1/10th of a second accuracy when the human reaction time is 0.25 seconds!

            Who said the service indicator is evaluating the movement? It is a single indication of one aspect of the movement – the period of autonomy.

            As it seems you don’t understand how it works I don’t think your assessment of it being a useless gimmick carries much credibility.

            Let me explain it to you. It is a reduction gearing that rotates a wheel every 5 years. The end. It is similar to a leap year indicator but not able to be adjusted via a pusher (hence accumulated movement life). Instead the watchmaker resets it upon servicing. As it relies on a very simple gearing ratio to run at a far from complex multiple of the second wheel, it’s accuracy is utterly without the need to demonstrate.

          • Marius

            OK, so it indicates the period of autonomy of the movement.
            The period of autonomy is not only influenced by how much you wear the watch, but also depends on other important factors such as the viscosity of oil (especially for this watch where a large part of the movement is directly exposed to light), shocks, humidity, etc.

            So, if you have this watch for only one year, but live in Dubai and constantly expose it to direct sunlight (that can dry out the oils faster), or expose your watch to constant shocks, it will need more frequent servicing, although the oil change indicator tells you otherwise.
            On the other hand, if you have this watch for seven years and hardly wear it, the indicator will tell you not to service it, although the oil might be partly dried out.

            As a result, if this autonomy indicator takes into consideration just one variable, but omits the others, its basically useless.
            Take two identical Ferraris with the same mileage of 20,000 km. If one has been used exclusively on the race track, under hard conditions, the wear&tear of those parts will be much, much higher than on the Ferrari used as a Sunday car, for cruising around town. So, only knowing the mileage won`t really give you a good idea of the autonomy left. The race car might actually need a service after only 2000 km.

          • iamcalledryan

            Wrong again. You seem to think autonomy means engine state? The autonomy of the movement is the length of time it runs for. The power reserve indicator is also a measure of the autonomy of the movement (think of the FP Journe variety) yet you don’t also demand that it measures torque or viscosity.

            You are trying to add all sorts of extra things to this indicator because it has a funny name. It’s useless to you because you seem to think it is more than it is. Your mileage point is actually a good one. It doesn’t matter what Ferrari you have, they both need to go in for service at 20k miles and that is what the indicator is for, yet you seem to be expecting the indicator to do the service too!

          • Marius

            Iamcalledryan, please check the Urwerk website. According to the Urwerk site, the oil change indicator alerts the owner when a service interval is due.
            So, the very manufacturer of this watch clearly states that this indicator tells its owners when its time to service the watch. They don`t say anything about movement life indicator, or autonomy indicator.

            So, if this is a service indicator, logically it means that it doesn`t only look at the autonomy, it should also take into consideration the state of the oil, and the wear of the parts. So my question is how can it achieve this?

          • iamcalledryan

            Don’t be so pedantic. You can determine whether you need a service by the period of cumulative autonomy. Ergo this can be referred to as a service interval indicator. The oil point is moot because the wear-degradation will occur far before a service is needed due to idle decay. Yet to you it is critical, fine, go ask them to develop an OIL GAUGE, which alongside a service interval / autonomy indicator would make TWO complications.

            There is not a single complication on a watch that provides a better and more comprehensive reading of its data than something more complex than a watch. Why don’t you extend your pedantry to every other complication?

            Should a day/night indicator be able to proactively check if the sun has set?

            Should a power reserve also tell you torque levels?

            Should a perpetual calendar not need to be wound?

            Feel free to repeat yourself, I’m done.

          • @Marius : Would you be willing to accept that it is a semi-useless and semi-kinda of the thing for the guy who really doesn’t know when he (or she) bought it or last had it serviced? I’m willing to compromise with you on this subject.

            Cheers!

          • iamcalledryan

            No more useless than the modern minute repeater, which was designed for use before household electricity and street lighting!

          • @iamcalledryan:disqus That honestly never occurred to me. I was thinking of people with poor or no eyesight would benefit from a minute repeater.

            Cheers!

          • @iamcalledryan : A mechanical watch that would sync to an atomic clock?! I would be in Heaven!

            Cheers!

          • iamcalledryan

            not quite mechanical but have you seen the insane Hoptroff No.16?

          • No I haven’t, what’s it like?

          • iamcalledryan

            It’s atomic – go check it out. The thing has an oven in it for baking Caesium 133. I kid you not…

          • @iamcalledryan:disqus : Ah, now I remember it. An amazing feat of engineering to say the least. Now if they could just make it half the width…

            Cheers!

          • JimBob

            RE: oil
            So they say, but I think this is a lie.

          • iamcalledryan

            Like with food they are conservative on the shelf life, but it’s not a total lie. There are some watches that have sat unused for 50 years but the movement is totally seized because the lube has decayed. So it’s somewhere between 6 years an 50!

          • JimBob

            Not sure what kind of lube they used 50 years ago or how well the cases were sealed.

          • iamcalledryan

            They used children’s tears, which was ridiculous. Modern lube is Unicorn tears, which everybody knows retains viscosity for longer.

          • JimBob

            I was thinking whale oil, which would be less corrosive to steel parts than children’s tears.
            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whale_oil

          • Sadly the oil/lube in watches thickens over time whether the watch has spend the years running or not (according to my watchmaker). So mechanical wear aside, periodic cleaning is not a bad idea just to clean out the gunk. But that that period is is an open question. Until the accuracy starts to degrade, a lot of people just hold off (I’m not saying that is a good idea, just that it’s a common practice). Cheers guys.

          • iamcalledryan

            They market the stuff as a 6 year shelf life, which is likely conservative. So your watch would have to be idle for a 1.5 days per week for this particular complication to be at odds with the shelf life.

            Wear and active lube degradation is the service-trigger with a worn watch, not shelf life.

          • I’m not the expert with this, but I would expect the shelf life for oil in the tube to be longer than applied oil in a watch where the surrounding air (limited as it is) would dry the oil faster. But a watchmaker could provide better info I’m sure. Cheers.

          • iamcalledryan

            Agreed, but the lube is designed to function for 5-7 years in the average watch, so if it is applied to a movement in the last year of its bottle shelf life, they would have factored in another 5-7 in a watch as part of that shelf life figure. But I am also well off piste in terms of expertize here!

          • @iamcalledryan : Sorry for asking what is probably a stupid question.

            You wrote, “… well off piste..” What does that mean, or was it a typo? I can infer what you mean by the sentence but I am not familiar with the word “piste”.

            Cheers!

          • iamcalledryan

            It’s a skiing term for going off course, which is strange because I haven’t skied in 15 years!

          • Ah… the dim light brightens.

            I haven’t skied for about 35 years, and you couldn’t get me on the slopes now for all the tear in China. Although… you probably could for a Patek Philippe.

          • @iamcalledryan : Seeing you defend your position with such passion reminds me of the other day when I was defending mine. Good on you!

          • @Mark Carson: As I don’t know much about you other than the comments you have posted on the blog, please forgive my ignorance…

            You have a watchmaker, or do you have a (micro?) brand of your own?

            Sorry for the lack of knowledge on my part.

          • Yeah, I have a small watch brand. But as I don’t assemble the watches (I have a professional here on Oahu do that for me), I’m not a “watchmaker”. http://MarkCarson.com
            Thanks for asking. And we are all here to learn more about, well, everything. So lack of knowledge is an ongoing issue we are all “fixing” on a daily basis. Cheers.

  • JimBob

    I wood like a different strap and bezel plz thx.

  • Boogur T. Wang

    Looking and considering a bit further I think I like the straps on this piece. It seems to bring a noew idea into the ‘watch cloth strap’ mix. Some new material, maybe add a bit of Velcro@ into the strap securing end and something new is added.
    The use of different fabrics and Velcro@ as a securing method might be something worth consideration and experimentation.

    • Although I don’t quiet share your view on how the fabric watch strap looks, I’m all in favor of Velcro as a fastener on cloth or fabric straps — on watches that are suitable for that kind of a strap of course.

      The green tweed one doesn’t look too bad

      Although… you could put a strap like the one shown in this article and put it on your Rolex. No one who sees would’t think its just a counterfeit item.

      “A real Rolex, on a strap like that? Give your head a shake mate!”

      Cheers!