Complicated All-Wood Watches By Valerii Danevych pg. 2

Complicated All-Wood Watches By Valerii Danevych

Complicated All Wood Watches By Valerii Danevych   watch releases

Though I'm sure that couldn't have been an easy path to take, Mr. Danevych persevered, and ultimately ended up creating the only functioning wooden watches in the world  - including a model that features a flying tourbillon.  A note on that - if you're been reading here for some time (or listening to the podcast), you realize that while the tourbillon is of limited practical use within a watch, it's a feat of precision engineering to create one - and that's with using modern materials and methods.  Just think about doing that in wood!

Complicated All Wood Watches By Valerii Danevych   watch releases

This article contains pictures of quite a few of the watches that have been created.  To give you some sense of what all is involved, I'm going to focus in on the most complex (to create) one, which is known as the Retrograde.  Fittingly enough, given the name, the watch features a retrograde function (for displaying the time), as well as the impressive wooden tourbillon.  The 36mm x 13mm  movement itself is composed of 154 different pieces (including the hands), offers a 24-hour power reserve, and has an accuracy within 2-3 minutes per day.

Complicated All Wood Watches By Valerii Danevych   watch releases

On the 46mm case that houses the movement, you've got a few other twists - partly for design, and partly due to the materials in use.  On the right side of the case, there's a crown (which doesn't pull out) under a removable section of the case, along with a switch.  To wind the watch, you move the switch to the upper position, and wind away.  If you need to adjust the time, move the switch to the lower position, and use the crown to set the time.  Push the switch back to the upper position, replace the cover, and you're ready to go.

Complicated All Wood Watches By Valerii Danevych   watch releases

There are eight different woods used in this model, and it also contains eight springs - of which, only four are metal (the other four are made from bamboo).  In terms of miniaturization, you've got parts as small as 0.12mm (a bearing pin) and 0.9mm (pinion).  For a frame of reference, a common pin head is about 1.5mm in diameter.  As you might imagine, this sort of work, when done properly, is not a quick process.  Danevych ended up logging 1800 hours over a seven month period to create and assemble the 188 pieces involved.

Complicated All Wood Watches By Valerii Danevych   watch releases

Given the level of hand-made effort involved, and the obvious craftsmanship, it's no surprise that these one-of-a-kind watches are firmly in the luxury bracket when it comes to pricing; the Retrograde model comes in at a solid 150.000 EUR (~$200,000) (other models start at 50,000 EUR; clocks start at 5,000 EUR and range up to 50,000 EUR).  While I'm certainly a proponent of wearing what you've got in the collection, I think these watches are destined to be "safe queens" - and rightly so.  And, for the vast majority of us, these pictures are likely as close as you'll come to these pieces, but that's ok.  This sort of craftsmanship should serve as a way to let other watchmakers think about what they can do with the materials they have at hand, as Mr. Danevych continues to refine his craft.  Frankly, if this sort of beauty and function can come from carving a lowly tree, then the sky is truly the limit with our modern materials.  danevych.com

Complicated All Wood Watches By Valerii Danevych   watch releases

Images courtesy of Valerii Danevych

5 comments
inspired_design
inspired_design

Wow, what a thing of beauty! The trend in wood watches has been fun to follow. Although, I do enjoy the hybrid design that Original Grain came out with recently. Not on the same level as these, but a pretty sweet watch nonetheless.

MarkCarson
MarkCarson

I saw some of his work at BaselWorld 2013 at the AHCI booth. Truly jaw dropping stuff.

Lesthepom
Lesthepom

A totally unbelievable pice of craftsmanship I don't know how he did it but I am glad he did it is a wonder to behold would love to see one up close

I do wonder how it will survive a long life wood changes as it gets older and dries or swells I suppose time will tell

Ulysses31
Ulysses31

Truly delightful works of art.  I'm amazed he could produce a wooden movement so small with fine teeth that don't simply snap.  How is it lubricated?  How accurate is it?  I'm guessing that the finer wooden parts are somehow infused with another substance that makes them more resilient to wear.  Whatever, these are very impressive timepieces.

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