BEST FROM: aBlogtoWatch & Friends March 11, 2016 ABTW Round-Ups

We begin March’s round-up with an emphasis on Japan. As one of the economic giants of the world, it is not surprising to learn that Japan is also one of the world’s largest markets for watches. Add this to the Japanese obsession for perfection, quality, and integrity, and what you have is an inviting and intriguing hunting ground for vintage watches. In this round-up, we will take a look at what is it is like to buy used and vintage watches in Japan. We will also share the experiences of a watch enthusiast’s recent trip to Japan and what boutiques are worth visiting.

Japan aside, we will of course be taking a look at some really impressive and important watches. To begin, we will check out new variants of Greubel Forsey’s Tourbillon 24 Secondes Contemporain watch. For chronograph lovers, we will also be examining the Montblanc 1858 Chronograph Tachymeter Limited Edition. German watch fans will be pleased that we have also included A. Lange & Söhne’s ultra-rare Lange One in Honey Gold in this round-up. And finally, back to Japan, we will take a look at Citizen’s new Campanola watches which feature Swiss movements.


1. Greubel Forsey Tourbillon 24 Secondes Contemporain Watch Hands-On

BEST FROM: aBlogtoWatch & Friends March 11, 2016 ABTW Round-Ups

The Greubel Forsey Tourbillon 24 Secondes Contemporain is one of the brand’s staple pieces. It has been around for some time and is available in a number of variants. Greubel Forsey recently announced three new variants – in white gold and titanium, in 5N red gold and titanium, and in white gold and diamonds with blue titanium – which we will be taking a look at here. Though this model is not particularly new, it’s always a treat to have an up-close look at any Greubel Forsey watch because the finishing work on them is second to none in this industry. The laborious relief engraving on the case sides, finely beveled movement bridges, immaculately polished movement components and the sapphire tourbillon bridge are just a joy to behold.

Source: aBlogtoWatch


2. Montblanc 1858 Chronograph Tachymeter Limited Edition Watch Hands-On

BEST FROM: aBlogtoWatch & Friends March 11, 2016 ABTW Round-Ups

Last year, Montblanc introduced its new 1858 collection. 1858 is the year that Swiss watch brand Minerva was founded, and Minerva in turn, was acquired by Montblanc in 2006. Today, Minerva is responsible for producing Montblanc’s more exotic pieces, such as the 1858 ExoTourbillon Chronographe. In any case, to kickstart the 1858 collection are four watches, two of which are the limited edition 1858 Chronograph Tachymeter watches that you see here. Available in steel and red gold, both variants will be limited to just 100 pieces. The highlight of these pieces is undoubtedly the movement, which is the calibre MB 16.29. This is a Minerva-branded chronograph movement that is built to the highest standards and alone is arguably worth the price of the watch, in my books.

Source: aBlogtoWatch

3. Citizen Campanola Mechanical Watches With Swiss Movements Hands-On

BEST FROM: aBlogtoWatch & Friends March 11, 2016 ABTW Round-Ups

Citizen is one of the largest watch companies in the world. Most people would be familiar with their Miyota 8215 and 9015 movements, which are found in many micro-brand watches, but did you know that they also own movement maker La Joux-Perret and also the brand Arnold & Son? For the uninitiated, Camponola is the high-end sub-brand of Citizen and the newest watches of this collection will use Swiss-made movements from La Joux-Perret. But don’t for a moment think that Citizen is trying to pass these new Camponola watches off as Swiss-made. Not at all, the watches are clearly labelled as being assembled in Japan, and these watches are visibly proud of their Japanese heritage.

Source: aBlogtoWatch

4. Guide To Buying Used & Vintage Watches In Tokyo, Japan

BEST FROM: aBlogtoWatch & Friends March 11, 2016 ABTW Round-Ups

Outside of Hong Kong, Tokyo is another Asian city that all watch lovers should visit at some point. In fact, a recent report shows that Japan is the third largest luxury market in the world, which shouldn’t be surprising at all considering their economic might. However, another reason why Japan, and Tokyo specifically, is a great place for vintage watch hunting is because of the attitudes that Japanese have toward collecting and watches in general. Watches are often kept in a very good condition, and the dealers pride themselves on their knowledge and integrity. This makes vintage watch hunting enjoyable. Language remains a major barrier for some, but hopefully this guide will help you make the most of your next watch-hunting trip in Tokyo, Japan.

Source: aBlogtoWatch

5. Explaining Design Problems With Date Displays On Watches

BEST FROM: aBlogtoWatch & Friends March 11, 2016 ABTW Round-Ups

For many watch lovers, the date complication and the position of the date window is an important consideration when purchasing a watch. Take, for instance, the Rolex Submariner: some watch lovers simply cannot accept the magnifying cyclops on the watch, and so they opt for the version without the date. In this article, we discuss the position and more about the date window and talk about how it can make or break a dial’s design.

Source: aBlogtoWatch

6. Cartier Santos 100 Watch Review

BEST FROM: aBlogtoWatch & Friends March 11, 2016 ABTW Round-Ups

The Cartier Santos is arguably one of the most legendary watches out there. Created in 1904, it is certainly one of the earliest wristwatches produced (and further notable as one that is still in production) and it was designed specifically for Brazilian aviator Alberto Santos-Dumont, who wanted a watch that could be used to tell the time whilst he was flying. In light of this, it won’t be a stretch to call the Santos a pilot’s watch, would it? In any case, the Santos is one of Cartier’s signature pieces, and here’s a close look at the Santos 100 watch.

Source: aBlogtoWatch

Next, our article picks from around the Web »



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