Bremont Supermarine S300 & S301 Dive Watches Hands-On

Bremont Supermarine S300 & S301 Dive Watches Hands-On

Bremont Supermarine S300 & S301 Dive Watches Hands-On Hands-On

We’re freshly back from a quick trip to England where we attended Bremont’s first alt-Baselworld event. Dubbed “Basel-on-Thames,” this was our chance to see Bremont’s latest releases amid the glittering backdrop of their iconic hometown. From the Bremont Townhouse in central London to their headquarters in the sprawling British countryside of nearby Henley, Bremont had the home field advantage, and it’s easy to see why the Swiss like to keep the big shows in their own backyard. While we covered the entire new line as it was announced earlier this week, as promised, here is a closer look at the Bremont’s latest addition to the Supermarine family, the S300 and S301 divers.

Bremont Supermarine S300 & S301 Dive Watches Hands-On Hands-On

The biggest news here is that the new Bremont Supermarine Type 300 range uses a 40mm case, where the longstanding S500 and S2000 models were 43mm and 45mm, respectively. Named after the first Spitfire prototype, the S300 (and S301) are water resistant to 300m and feature a total thickness of just 13mm (much slimmer than the S500).

Bremont Supermarine S300 & S301 Dive Watches Hands-On Hands-On
The S300 blue (40 mm), the Terra Nova LE (43 mm), and the S2000 (45 mm)

Bremont Supermarine S300 & S301 Dive Watches Hands-On Hands-On

Bremont Supermarine S300 & S301 Dive Watches Hands-On Hands-On

Being Bremont, the cases are done in hardened steel and bear the recognizable profile of Bremont’s multi-piece Trip-Tick design. All three iterations use domed anti-reflective sapphire crystals and are finished with a solid steel case back that is decorated with a portrait of an early Supermarine aircraft. Available in two versions, the S300 comes in blue or black with a dial sporting mixed Arabic markers and red accents. The black S300 has a matte dial and bezel insert with a gilt scale and a crown with a gold-tone accent.

Bremont Supermarine S300 & S301 Dive Watches Hands-On Hands-On

Bremont Supermarine S300 & S301 Dive Watches Hands-On Hands-On

Bremont Supermarine S300 & S301 Dive Watches Hands-On Hands-On

The blue S300 has a radiant sunburst dial with white accents and a polished ceramic bezel insert. It’s worth mentioning that the S300/S301 seen in these photos are prototypes, so small details may change or be refined before final production. This includes the color of the blue bezel, which should be closer to that of the dial for the production version of the watch.

Bremont Supermarine S300 & S301 Dive Watches Hands-On Hands-On


Bremont Supermarine S300 & S301 Dive Watches Hands-On Hands-On

All three iterations feature a date at three and are powered by Bremont’s BE-92AE automatic movement. This COSC-certified Swiss caliber is based on a lightly modified ETA 2892 (the same movement that Omega used for their 1120 caliber). The BE-92AE is a 4Hz movement with 21 jewels, a Nivaflex 1 mainspring, Glucydur balance, Anachron balance spring, and a power reserve of 38-plus hours.

Bremont Supermarine S300 & S301 Dive Watches Hands-On Hands-On

If you want your vintage appeal in a somewhat stronger flavour, the S301 should do the trick. With faux-aged Super-LumiNova (just as we saw on Bremont’s ALT1-ZT/51 and P-51) and a traditional Sub-like use of dots and hashes for the markers, the S301 is a nod to the early dive watches of the '50s and '60s. Any of the three versions can be had on your choice of a two-stitch calf leather strap, a striped heavy-duty NATO, or Bremont’s steel bracelet.

Bremont Supermarine S300 & S301 Dive Watches Hands-On Hands-On

Bremont Supermarine S300 & S301 Dive Watches Hands-On Hands-On

Aesthetically, the S300/S301 represents a considerable departure from the format Bremont established with their S500. Gone is the lumed sapphire bezel, the 2 o’clock crown and guard, the HEV, the lollipop hour hand, and the lovely center dial detailing. While certainly a more simplified design, the S300/S301 still manages to feel like a Bremont. Legibility is strong and the sunburst blue dial packs a punch. Furthermore, that 40mm sizing feels great, especially on the leather strap. With 20mm lugs preventing the use of most pre-existing Bremont straps (most of their watches feature 22mm lugs), the S300/S301 will accommodate a wide variety of straps and Bremont will undoubtedly produce more OEM options in the future.

Bremont Supermarine S300 & S301 Dive Watches Hands-On Hands-On

Compared to the Bremont with which I am most familiar, the 43mm SOLO, the S300 and S301 wear smaller (duh), sit about as high, but position more centrally on my 7-inch wrist, thanks to a shorter lug-to-lug length. If you’ve tried a Bremont and decided that you wanted something a bit smaller, the S300/S301 (or the new AIRCO, also 40mm) offer a strong appeal. Of the three available strap options, I’d opt for the leather. The NATO is very soft and comfortable, but great NATO straps are also readily available for much less money than a good leather strap. The bracelet will be the default option for some dive watch buyers, but I’ve never been a big fan of bracelets, especially when paired with smaller case sizes. Bremont’s bracelet is heavy but not overly chunky, with solid end-links and a push-button fold-over clasp.

Bremont Supermarine S300 & S301 Dive Watches Hands-On Hands-On

Bremont Supermarine S300 & S301 Dive Watches Hands-On Hands-On

If you dig the look of the S300/S301, then I’d entirely recommend seeing all three in person - the press images did not do them justice. As we arguably enter the zenith of popularity for vintage-inspired dive watches, the S300/S301 offers an entirely different spin on a dive watch from Bremont while still including a number of the signature elements that helped put this brand on the map. Priced at $4,095 USD on a strap or $4,695 on a bracelet, the S300 and S301 should be with retailers in the second half of this year. bremont.com

 

What do you think?
  • Thumbs up (35)
  • I want it! (14)
  • I love it! (10)
  • Interesting (8)
  • Classy (0)
  • Word Merchant

    More dull and overpriced tat from Bremont. $4k+ for a ‘lightly modified’ ETA? No thanks.

  • I’ll take a blue S300 on a leather strap thank you. Well, not at that price, but otherwise a very attractive watch. Too bad the value proposition does not add up for me as I like the watch a lot.

  • Joe

    Looks a bit like Christopher Ward’s c60….and for that price i will take a Black Bay over it.

  • Lincolnshire Poacher

    First Bremont I’ve genuinely liked. Same as Mark C, I like the blue S300. The hands, size, colour, indices (not the faux vintage), it all works. I read the article but missed whether the bezels were ceramic.
    They’ve squarely priced themselves in the luxury price segment. I’m not sure how much extra you’re getting for the money than , say, the CWard C60 pro 600 automatic. Its got similar movement, and a 600m WR.

    • AW

      For the money you can get two SH21 CWard watches and you’ll still have some change left! Or an inhouse Tudor and something else. Or maybe IWC Mark XVIII/IWC Ingenieur 3239 with similar movement to Bremont’s. I applaud Bremont’s social media acumen, but people’s bullshit meters are firing for a reason!

  • JimBob

    38 hour reserve, eh? Pass.

  • MEddie90

    They’re attractive watches for sure but lack a certain originality and character that their older divers offered. Gone are the lumed bezels, unique crown guard and gorgeous handset, at least they kept their trip-tick case which helps give the watch a little more personality than your average, bog-standard diver but still not enough to differentiate them.

    Pricing is a little aggressive for a typical, ETA driven dive watch, going head to head against Tudor and Omega who both offer far more unique and established products (with inhouse / more heavily modified movements) and priced well above many other fantastic divers from the likes of Sinn and Cward (and Janis Trading of course).

    It’s nice to see a more reasonably proportioned diver from them but they should have stuck to the blueprint and design language of their previous offerings imho.

  • Raymond Wilkie

    I really want to like this brand. British and proud, but unfortunately this brand does nothing for me.If pushed to give a choice i would have the S300, the blue face is nice but it’s now a tad too small. In the main they are verging on really boring, maybe i have to see one to appreciate it more re : weight and build quality. I can’t tell you how much i hate the look of a nato strap. If i had the cash, i would have a Santos.

    • Mark1884

      Watch 101: It is a “dial”, not a “face”
      *Clunk*

      • Beefalope

        Who cares, professor? You understood what he was saying.

        • Mark1884

          Well…. I guess I cared. He thanks you for the backup though.
          Moving on………..*Clunk*

          • Raymond Wilkie

            You owe me 10c for 2 uses of the word *Clunk™

      • Raymond Wilkie

        The watch face contains the dials that indicate the time.

        • Mark1884

          I do not even understand that comment. Are you high right now?
          Moving on……………… *Clunk*

          • Raymond Wilkie
          • Mark1884

            Wilkie old bean…….. I like your commitment, even if I feel it is incorrect.
            I surrender sir and will remit payment on demand, in person.
            I consider our personal thread here closed, and look forward to seeing you on the next topic.
            Cheers!

  • DebugOutput

    As I posted on a previous article about these watches, I feel that compared to my S500 (which I still dearly love two years on) I feel these lack character and are now just a bit ubiquitous-looking. No beautiful crown guard, rather plain styling, lack of dial texture and gone is the lovely framed day/date window and lollipop hour hand. Perhaps I should see them in person as recommended. They are also expensive and at this price even as a satisfied Bremont owner I would look elsewhere. I bought my S500 second-hand for £2.3K in mint condition and at that price I am very happy, but these offer less in comparison and are just too costly IMO.

  • SuperStrapper

    Not that they’re unattractive, there’s just not an ounce of originality in the bunch. For the price they command there should be something to make them special, and I’m just not seeing it.

    Also kids, this article is a great example of how something as simple as a nato strap can make your watch look juvenile and extra cheap.

    • Mark1884

      I concur. Never understood the whole nato strap thing. Tried one and hated it. The fold over extra strap tucked in is atrocious.

    • Shinytoys

      I enjoy the NATO straps for diving and especially keeping dive watches 52 mm secured and in place. I also upgrade the pinholes on the watch making them a hair deeper and using “Fat Bars” for extra security. Out of the water, I’m not sure I could justify the design…

      • SuperStrapper

        Agreed. If you actually dive with your dive watch it might make sense. But that describes >0.01% of the dive watch buying public.

  • Dcf

    What a lovely $1200 watch and a LoL yeah right $4500 watch. These guys are too big for their britches.

  • The whole core of Bremont’s marketing scheme is “British, British, British” which would be laudable, had they produced an in-house movement in Britain. It would justify the price and add a little gravitas to what is essentially a company that cases ETA movements and sells you on an ersatz backstory. They’re not bad looking by any means; in fact, for less than $2000, I’d be all in on the blue-dialed model. For $4500, though, I’ll buy a brand new Black Bay and take a dive trip with the remainder.

    • Beefalope

      You’ve just perfectly summarized Bremont in a nutshell.

    • The Deplorable Boogur T. Wang

      To me, their (Bremonts) marketing scheme is more like “Dads Army” than “British, British, British.” Altrhough perhaps it is the same thing.
      Reliance on a myth and hook the unwary with the “feelings.”
      Selling the smoke and not the sizzle.

  • Framlucasse

    Nice watches, but for an ETA, the price is ridiculous.

  • Greg Dutton

    The blue looks like a parts bin project – sunburst dial and glossy bezel that are two different shades of blue, plus a black date wheel. The matte black is at least cohesive, but that price…

  • Pranjal

    Why do u guys think that if it’s an eta it should not cost much.I don’t hate Rolex omega or Tudor but even if their movement is inhouse their calibres are not made of gold and they are mass manufactured it’s not hand made and by the way omega seamaster is also an eta-2892.And as far as a Rolex clone then even Rolex submariner is also a clone because the first dive watch was a blancpain fifty fathoms.

    • IanE

      Mostly I agree – but put the S300 beside an Omega Seamaster 300M ceramic and tell me the Bremont is value-for-money.

    • For $4500, you can buy a pristine preowned Blancpain FF Trilogy GMT.

    • Beefalope

      Well, why do you think it should cost so much?

      • Pranjal

        I know the pricing is a little bit unfair.it should cost about 3000-3500 dollars but that is the case with Rolex submariner also and when it is comparing with blancpain fifty fathoms.But Rolex equals that with good resale value

        • gw01

          A steel Submariner does in fact retail for less than a FF.

          • Pranjal

            A blancpain ff is cheaper pre owned than a ceramic submariner

        • Beefalope

          I don’t think the pricing is unfair. A company can charge whatever it likes for its products.

          However, in a highly competitive landscape, I think the pricing is ridiculous. There are plenty of chronographs out there from established brands that cost less than this.

          And I’m no Rolex fan, but there is zero comparison between Rolex and Bremont.

    • gw01

      I dont think the issue is with it being an ETA (Sellita, Miyota, etc) or not. It’s with brands that place an outsourced movement in a case and price themselves as if they had made the movement in the first place (like currently Rolex, Tudor, Omega, etc do).

      Sure, the old Seamaster housed an ETA and is still much beloved, but they were also priced way more reasonably.

      Tudors have also been historically ETA based, but they offered the market that “Rolex” quality aura.

      Rolex produces an endless sea of watches, but the result of their current production has been defined by continuous refinement (design and engineering-wise). Their movements are robust, way within COSC standards, as they were the first to obtain the certification, and their production throughout history claims for itself of lots of “firsts”.

      The Submariner is a diver that is a product of “form follows function”. Dive watches simply need a turning bezel with a lume function… design-wise however, even if Blancpain’s FF was the first, there are divers that exist being their own selves without knocking-off/homaging anyone else (i.e. Many of the Seiko divers, the Submariner, Doxas, Omegas, APs, etc).

      Aesthetically looking at this run of divers we can argue that the red accents (name model, triangle), gilt accents and perhaps even the 3-6-9 display style are direct references from vintage Submariners. It isn’t a single item, it’s a combination of items all put together that make it so obvious.

      —- Back to the moments issue —-

      If currently one can get ETA-based watches for around $1,000, it means that an ETA-based watch can be produced for way under asking price, as the maker (brand) must turn a profit. What credit Bremont’s valuation of about x4.5 more?

      I do like the package, as a whole. Vintage vibes, modern tech, but of their steep asking prices, I’ll wait and see if something pops up in the used market and I’ll pick it up for pennies on the dollar of their MSRP.

      • Pranjal

        Hey but we should remember that it is the top grade eta movement and it is cosc certified and bremont regulated their movements even after the case is put on the watch.

        • gw01

          (Since we’re exchanging thoughts in written form, I can’t tell if that was a sarcastic comment). In case this is a serious intellectual exchange… your reply seems to address the engineering aspect of watchmaking, in which case I’d like to draw an analogy from the automotive industry: in this day and age, it’s as if Ferrari won with a re-tuned McLaren engine (or a re-assembled engine from plans from a McLaren design); it’d simply be a legit win (they would get the trophy) but in the eyes of purists it would be a win with an asterisk.

          But, back to watches… my local watchmaker regulates my ETAs with a full overhaul for $80. If regulating a pre-acquired movement is the deciding factor for a price increment for Bremont, I don’t see how that justifies their MSRPs.

        • Beefalope

          How much is that extra second or two per day worth to you?

    • Sheez Gagoo

      2892? A fewuyears ago, maybe. but now they have coax. or am I wrong?

      • Pranjal

        The omega sp has an eta 2892 with a coaxial tooth-lever system built into it and its vibration is regulated to 25200 vibrations

        • Mountainous Man

          + a free sprung balance and a higher level of finishing. That’s about like calling the McLaren F1 engine simply a BMW engine.

        • Sheez Gagoo

          What is an Omega sp? I know Omega had a Coaxial based on a 2892. But that was decades ago. Can yo show me a pic?

    • dennis

      Most people forget that.

  • BNABOD

    Ok so let’s be clear the Omega 1120 caliber modifications of the 2892 are in a whole ball game when compared to Bremont “light” changes like engraving a rotor. To make the assumption that they are in the same league is deceiving even though yes they are based on the 2892. Having said this I fee the mode presented are a bit dull. Surely well made Bremont has invested a lot in equipment but I think for 4 grand one could find better elsewhere cough Tudor cough

  • Astronuts

    The best high end English product worth the price : Marshall Amps not Bremont!

  • Pranjal

    Bremont is trying a design which is tried and tested at least and legible also it is more robust because of its tip trick case

  • Pranjal

    Black bay is great but Christopher ward movement is a so called “in house movement “.

  • Mark1884

    Bremont who?? These guys don’t even know what an “in house” movement is. Spend the money on something that has value and longevity.
    Pricing this at the Omega Seamaster level is a joke!

    • Not if you consider their steel, which others have mentioned is almost as scratch resistant as sapphire.

      • Mark1884

        I understand your point, but cannot agree.
        I just cant see spending that much money, on a no name brand watch.
        Take that money and get a Seamaster, Superocean or a used Submariner.
        Something that will have resale value.

        • Aside from the resell value, I think it’s cooler to own a no-brand but quality watch, if only to set yourself apart from the “oh, he has an omega just because he can afford it, not because he knows anything about watches” crowd.

          • Mark1884

            Again, I understand your point but cannot agree. I don’t consider Bremont a high quality watch. I think it is a $1k watch, trying to be sold for almost $5k.
            The owners got caught making false statements about their “in house” movement. Then had to feign ignorance when called out on it. If you own a watch company, and don’t understand what “in house” movement means in the watch world, they you do not deserve my money.
            My 5k (add name here Rolex, Omega etc) will still be a 5k watch after the sale. The Bremont will be worth ???

            The cool factor is lost for me, when the price is that high.

  • Pranjal

    U can always buy a bremont preowned for 2 grand if someone has a problem

    • Beefalope

      Or less.

    • DebugOutput

      Correct. I did and I have found second hand Bremont prices to be a great value proposition. The S500 I own is far more than a $1,200 watch; I own several ~$1,200 watches and the S500 is superior in almost every way. Watches are so much more than just the movement and in this price bracket there are very few, if any, actually interesting or decorated movements anyway, regardless of the manufacture. I think that is best left to haute horology. If an ETA serves a purpose and does the job I really don’t care. I don’t think very many people here criticising Bremont have actually ever touched one of their watches, let alone owned one.

      • Yojimbo

        Being in Canada, I’ve never seen one in RL, correct. But I do think their retail price is grossly inflated based on specs and that’s fair to say.

        • DebugOutput

          I would agree inflated, but I wouldn’t say grossly so. They are using their own patented case design, modified movement, specially strengthened stainless steel with a hardness rating comparable to sapphire glass, their own dials/hands and they are building them in the UK at low volume. They can’t do all this and compete at the same price point as mass producers. But what you get in return is something a little different, a very robust timepiece, a watch put together in the UK and fantastic support/customer service (I know, I’ve used them).

          • The steel being as scratch resistan as sapphire, certainly helps a lot with the pricing!

          • SuperStrapper

            Claimed, but proven?

            Sapphire: 2200+ vickers
            316 Steel: 150 (ish) vickers
            Regimented 316 Steel: 1200 (ish) vickers

            Even after tegimenting that is a delta of about 1000 vickers, which is huge. Now, I know that vickers is a harness scale and not a true ‘scratch resistances’ scale, but the 2 are highly related obviously. What is Bremont doing to this steel? They call it ‘B-EBE2000’ with a pretty shitty process description: heat treated, diffused with carbon, bombarded with electrons. Zuh? Thats just gobbledegook. Are they trying to say they are using a PVD treatment, and that the coating is 2000 vickers? If so, fine, but that’s not naked steel being brought to 2000 vickers. If Bremont is good at one thing, it’s subterfuge. Part of that description ‘sound’s like case hardening, where steel is super heated and then a carbon powder is added, again hardening the surface, but not to 2000 vickers. And the case hardening process would warp a finished watch chase, and once done with make the steel practically un-machineable.

            It’s always so frustrating that they just won’t be upfront with their prospective customers.

          • cluedog12

            Right at the bottom of the same page is the bullsh*t Rosetta Stone:

            “Bremont carefully applies as many as 15 to 20 coats of Super-LumiNova® paint to a range of dials in our collection; it ensures optimal visibility in the poorest of lighting conditions.”

            What the hell does this mean? From a random Watchuseek forum thread:

            “The number of layers doesn’t really mean anything, since it doesn’t say anything about the thickness of each layer, and the ratio of lume powder to binder used for each layer, and the type and tint of lume power used. The quality of the application and binder also matters, as moisture can degrade the lume material.”

            “But cluedog12”, you may say, “You know that a forum post does not make for an authoritative reference?”

            To this I say, “I’ve refuted bullshit with bullshit.”

            I’ve got nothing against these watches, regardless of the vacuous jargon.

          • SuperStrapper

            I like to see Bremont develop and release a watch case milled from coprolite that has a unique surface treatment completely developed in-house that provides a superior reflective finish.

            Then they’d actually have a polished turd.

          • Thanks for the info, and yes, if they just throw words at it, then we can’t know what on Earth they’re doing to increase hardness.

            Adding carbon to the steel will make it rust, afaik (at least that’s true with carbon steel knives).

          • SuperStrapper

            I don’t know that is entirely true, but it would depend on the steel and in what format you are adding carbon.

          • Kuroji

            Stainless steel is rust resistant because it has a surface passivation layer due to the chrome content. It has nothing to do with carbon.

          • I see, so carbon steel rusts because it lacks chrome. Thanks!

          • Yojimbo

            it sounds lke the modifications on the movement are purely decorative is I can infer from what’s written. It’s a very nice design to my eye which loves redundant copy cat designs. I could see buying it today if it was anywhere south of 2k

  • Shawn Lavigne

    aesthetically i don’t really care for the them: its a lugs and crown thing. pricing is ambitious. they seem to generate a lot of controversy – where there is smoke there is fire? personally for the money i’d look elsewhere, but if i already had the elsewheres, then these might make a nice eclectic addition to an already solid collection.

  • Yojimbo

    The price isn’t justified as others have written already. What’s the story on the caseback is that etched or an enamel?

    • SuperStrapper

      These are prototypes, so I assume that will eventually an engraving or relief in a metal caseback that helps them push along the questionable tales of having an aviation history.

    • Joe

      For that price, probably engraved by using an unicorn horn

  • Bill Grist

    5k for am uninteresting watch that could be built with the same quality with parts from ebay. They are good looking but not 5 times more than Steinhart or Helson.. Why do I feel that Bremont is attempting to confabulate a legacy that competes with a 90’s Breitling or Omega?

  • Michael Yang

    Honestly, the Richard LeGrand on Kickstarter for $250 looks better than this watch.

    The only unique feature on this watch is its lugs…took me awhile to place what inspired the intricate curves…

    ugh…(please be warned, if you don’t want to ruin it for yourself, I’d suggest not to google maxi-pad)

  • Luciano

    Maybe (just maybe) if it was $1k. Asking more for it than for an Omega or Tudor is just plain insane.

  • Shinytoys

    I like the watch and the engine, but the price is a swing and a miss…

  • Chemistman

    For the price you can do much much better. Bremont must be day dreaming

  • DanW94

    They’ve done a nice job cobbling together a bunch of tried and true design elements into a cohesive, attractive and altogether non-threatening desk diver. Personally I wouldn’t pay that much as I could pick up a slew of other well made divers equipped with an ETA movement at a fraction of the cost, but if Bremont feels they can successfully compete with this model in that price range more power to them. The market will eventually decide if they’re worthy of the price. And from what I’ve seen they hold their value very well.

  • Raymond Wilkie

    I do hope the boys at Bremont are too busy flying their planes than read this blog. None of us are being very nice about their range.

    • IanE

      Constructive advice, however!

      • Raymond Wilkie

        That, i can’t deny.

  • James Miller

    I can buy a Longines Hydroconquest with an ETA 2824 movement for about $1k.
    Just sayin’…

    • Shinytoys

      that’s actually saying a lot…The Hydro is using an excellent in house movement and I prefer the cosmetics as well…

  • Juan-Antonio Garcia

    Do not understand the price. The watch is nice, but can’t see the value for them to ask for that much. There are a LOT of very good options at this price range, why trying to compete with an inferior product? Good luck.

  • Yan Fin

    We can discuss more in a year, when it ends up on Overstock for $500

    • Mark1884

      Too funny!

  • goju1

    An ‘upstart’Start Up without a pedigree (in watches or aviation) asking unreasonable prices for their unoriginal, gimmicky watches…

  • Lawrence

    Excuse me but what an ugly watch. So thin profile, crown is small, the strap, the nato and the bracelet have little attention to detail. The hands, the font are so dated.. The S500 s2000 are ok. This one is so bad for the price.

  • ??????

    $ 5k ETA-based Rolex hommage.

  • The Deplorable Boogur T. Wang

    Them Bremont fellas seem to do a good job of fleecing the rubes.

  • Pingback: Bremont AIRCO Mach 1 & Mach 2 Watches Hands-On | aBlogtoWatch()

  • Mike Darwin Brown

    Not a fan…..every since the movement tobago! Transparency is very important when spending the money we all do on these watches. Once I lose trust in your product, you lose me for a lifetime. I’m sure they are very concerned with losing me as a possible customer….lol. I’m concerned as well…..

  • gw01

    Is Bremont a real watch brand? Oh, you think they are? Think again:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7eg81-b-Jko

    (check mate)