The Haskell From Marloe Watch Company

The Haskell From Marloe Watch Company

The Haskell From Marloe Watch Company Watch Releases

On November 1st 1911, Captain Robert Falcon Scott set out on the Terra Nova Expedition to reach the South Pole. Eleven weeks later, the naval officer became the first British explorer to ever reach the pole, but sadly perished on his return journey. The world was informed of the tragedy when Terra Nova, the ship that took Scott and his team to the Antarctic, reached land in New Zealand over a year later. Within days, Scott became a celebrated hero and national icon. The Haskell, by Marloe Watch Company, is inspired by such great British exploration, and is named after the Haskell Strait, an ocean passage which Scott and his team crossed as they set off from Ross Island in Antarctica.

The Haskell From Marloe Watch Company Watch Releases

Designed with the modern day adventurer in mind, the Haskell is robust enough to withstand the daily rigors of the modern traveler and elegant enough for the urban adventurer. It has everything it needs to accompany you every step of the way; as you bustle through the daily commute or trek over the next peak.

The Haskell From Marloe Watch Company Watch Releases

The case is a 2-part construction with a gently barrel-shaped profile, reflecting its strong and purposeful design. At 9.4mm high, from caseback to crystal, the Haskell offers exceptional comfort and discretion. Slim and unobtrusive, the Haskell is proudly anchored to your wrist with robust lugs, allowing it to slip comfortably under your cuff.

The Haskell From Marloe Watch Company Watch Releases

At 40mm in diameter and coupled with the edge-to-edge dial, the Haskell wears small but reads big. The dial is scalloped, leading from a flat center, curving up at the edges to the underside of the crystal. It looks so close, you feel you could reach down and touch it.

The Haskell From Marloe Watch Company Watch Releases

The dial is the watch. It’s everything. The Haskell has a truly intriguing dial; multi-layered, multi-textured, and multi-finished. At first glance, the dial might not look like it, but it has 23 individually applied metal blocks for the hours; each one meticulously finished and set to the metal dial. On each of the metal blocks there is also a layer of BG-W9 luminous material to assist with low-light reading.

Each dial has three sets of printed markings; the train-track minutes and seconds around the scalloped perimeter, Marloe’s logo at 12 o’clock, and in the very center of the dial, a small set of dots adding hour references - in addition to the all-important “Swiss Made” statement.

The Haskell From Marloe Watch Company Watch Releases

Then we come to the textures. The white dial has a subtle sandpaper finish in the center, while the sand version has a more pronounced surface. In both cases, the scallop retains a subtle brushed texture. For the green and blue dials, Marloe have chosen a more metallic approach with a sunburst texture in the center and the same finish to the outer scallop as the other dials. Always changing with the light, the four options each have their own character.

The Haskell From Marloe Watch Company Watch Releases

The polished date frame forms part of the applied index set and presents a clear, instantly readable presentation of the date. Date complications on dials are usually quite timid. The Haskell doesn’t know such a word.

The hands are meticulously designed to afford quick time reference – the hour hand is short with its own dot track around the center; the minute hand reaching out to the applied indexes and perimeter train-track scale. The sweeping seconds hand, thin with a luminous tip, completes the set. All hands feature counterweights that are identical, for that one moment in each hour when they’re all perfectly aligned; a small detail within a dial full of them.

The Haskell From Marloe Watch Company Watch Releases

Marloe typically likes to make a big statement about the other side of their watches – the Cherwell and Lomond both feature exhibition casebacks, whilst the Derwent features a small porthole. For the Haskell, Marloe used the real estate to celebrate the spirit of adventure and reference where the Haskell got its name. The outer polished ring is engraved with information and, in a first for MWC, sequential numbering. The inner section is gently domed to represent the globe, with an engraved and sand-blasted map showing Antarctica; at the very center of the map coordinates lies the South Pole, one of the greatest of all adventures.

The Haskell From Marloe Watch Company Watch Releases

Each of the Haskell versions comes with its own beautiful leather strap; supple yet firm, a deep lustrous material that changes appearance as you wear it. The strap is lined with the nubuck leather and finished with a signature polished buckle, including an offset Marloe cog icon.

To withstand the daily rigors of life, travel, and adventure, Marloe have used marine-grade stainless steel with thicker case walls and robust lugs for strength and rigidity. An anti-reflective coated sapphire crystal remains unobtrusive yet reassuringly strong. The Haskell is rated to 100m using a double-sealed caseback and crown to prevent any ingress.

The Haskell From Marloe Watch Company Watch Releases

For a Swiss Made watch comes a Swiss movement, and Marloe have specified the dependable ETA 2804-2 manual winding mechanical movement for the Haskell. It’s a petite movement at around 25.6mm in diameter, a mere sliver at 3.35mm thick, and when fully wound will run for over 40 hours. Despite this small frame, the 2804-2 still beats at a brisk 28,800 beats per hour; meaning the running seconds hand moves around the dial at 8 beats per second. Compared to a quartz watch running at one beat per second, the Haskell displays a gloriously buttery smooth sweep to its running second hand – evidence enough that something special ticks within.

The Haskell From Marloe Watch Company Watch Releases

Presentation comes in the form of a custom outer shipping box that holds a smaller black box which opens to reveal a beautifully presented celebration booklet and matte black cube form wooden box with engraved logo. Opening this, we are treated to a rare sight in the watch-box world; a non-leather interior. Marloe have opted for a tactile grey fabric interior, with a debossed tan leather label stitched to the inside of the lid bearing the tag “British Design, Swiss Made." It’s a striking aesthetic and an overall visceral unboxing experience.

The Haskell is priced at £995 (c. $1,300). For the movement, design and presentation, it’s an interesting value proposition and one that, coupled with the serialization and small batch production, is an opportunity to get a hold of what could be the foundation of future success for Marloe Watch Company. marloewatchcompany.com

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What do you think?
  • Interesting (17)
  • Thumbs up (6)
  • I want it! (5)
  • I love it! (3)
  • Classy (1)
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  • Daniel Harper

    It could be just me, but I really like the movement choices that you offer throughout your collection; ETA, Miyota, Seagull. If I were to purchase one, I’d probably go with one of the more affordable movement options. I think for smaller start-up brands, sea-gulls, seiko NH movements, or Miyota’s are perfect to open the door and get those first customers falling for your watches. That Swiss Made really gets the price up there for a watch nobody has heard of, although I’ve found plenty start-ups that use eta’s for $600+

  • IanE

    Nice dial, cheap-looking case, ridiculous price-point!

  • WINKS

    Mash Marloe…

    • Berndt Norten

      Winston Wolf is field-testing it

      • IG

        Bear Grylls already urinated on it.

  • Solloshi B. Hawkins

    Haskell’s a bit of a troublemaker. Just ask The Beav. I do like that they used applied numerals.

  • Raymond Wilkie

    I like these. Pity they are a bit small and don’t have an open back. The back story and the picture of Antarctica is totally lost on me. I couldn’t care less. Just be proud to have made the watch and have enough faith in your design without all the garbage that no one really cares about.

    • Berndt Norten

      Well I guess it would be nice
      If Ray liked your design
      You know jot every design
      Cuts the mustard with Ray
      (Ooooooh)

      Butchya gotta think twice
      Before Ray’s gonna sing the praise
      He gots to have his purple haze
      All thru the Scottish night

      • IG

        Tartan haze…

  • Tea Hound

    Nice looking watch. I like the date window treatment.

  • Yan Fin

    The watch looks pretty, good size. Best of luck!
    The post itself is hilarious: who would imagine that “for a Swiss Made watch comes a Swiss movement” ? And please, take this disgusting wrist shot down?

  • Ranchracer

    Ok looking watch, but pricing is WAY out of line. Needs to be about $900 USD cheaper to be realistic. And the stupid marketing garbage made me loose my breakfast. ?

  • error406

    Originally, with the hand wound Cherwell, it seemed that Marloe had an actual identity that set it apart from other watch upstarts. But by now it becomes clear that Marloe is just a series of marketing concepts of which the watch is the result, not the starting point.

    We’re now at “overpriced watch we’ll try to sell you based on the label ‘Swiss’ and some completely unrelated adventurer narrative that will vaguely remind you of real Swiss watches with a real story”.

    They do know how to make a well designed watch, but any credibility has been killed by the marketing.

  • DanW94

    The only exploration I see someone doing with this watch is intrepidly leaving their cubicle and fearlessly navigating the accounting department on the 3rd floor in search of a fresh pot of coffee. It’s a perfectly acceptable dress/casual option. The backstory is silly.

  • SuperStrapper

    I don’t see why the opening paragraph was necessary. Who among us honestly took a look at the watch and didn’t immediately think of 100 year old expeditions to the south pole? https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/cfc64fb55f3f5f7dcf9fbdb3c0d7b16f6c9e08482bcf386b2f197f5b64ac6513.jpg

  • Jon Snow

    “Compared to a quartz watch running at one beat per second, the Haskell displays a gloriously buttery smooth sweep to its running second hand – evidence enough that something special ticks within.”

    The things I learn on this blog.

    • Svetoslav Popov

      I also read that part twice and decided the author meant that the quartz second hand moves only once every second 🙂

  • Ross Diljohn

    I like it.

  • Svetoslav Popov

    Nice looking watch, but I am sick of stupid stories.

  • Lincolnshire Poacher

    There’s stuff to like about it. But on its own its not really for me.
    But with the first paragraph, (all I could read). Its a meh……

    • Berndt Norten

      Welcome back

      • Lincolnshire Poacher

        Cheers Brendt. You know how it is, the older you get the more you fall apart. Should have followed the manufacturer’s service schedual….. 🙂

        • 90k major service?

        • How are you doing with the recent “work”? I just commiserated with a friend who had a knee replacement 2 weeks ago. Told him that taking pain meds for a while is not a sign of weakness at all. Take care.

          • Lincolnshire Poacher

            Still on crutches, unbelievably annoying. You need the patience of a saint, just to do everyday normal stuff. Being on 2 crutches, I can’t even carry anything; for example, like a cup of tea from the kitchen to the sitting room! (That’s really annoying. I have to shuffle on my backside pushing the cup along the floor, very dignified).
            Trouble was breaking the same ankle for the third time, more bent metal than bone. But the worst was getting the infection in it after the operation. A bit tense there for a time, got into my blood, I was hallucinating for nearly a week. I have a very clear memory of telling my dad that the curtain over the other side of the room was a 7ft tall nurse.
            Thanks for asking though. Probably a bit longer an answer than you were expecting, but I always feel like I’ve made a couple of good friends on this site. The short version is; yes I’m much better, its just taking a long time,
            As for the meds, there’s no point being in pain. But they make you really hazy, I couldn’t focus enough to read a book, newspaper, or the internet while on the ‘good’ stuff.

          • I hear ya about the inconvenience (as well as the pain). I taped a plastic bag to my walker so I could take some stuff with me from room to room. Fortunately, the walker was only for a month or so. Went from it to walking (no crutches this go round). When I buggered up my legs back in ’83 they were very concerned about a possible bone infection since the broken end of my right femur ripped out of the flesh and then hit the mountain. So there were bits of grass and gravel to be removed from the broken end of the bone. But I was lucky, no infection. So I’m real sorry to hear about your infection – serious business. I have to take antibotiocs before I go to the dentist for the rest of my life now that I’ve had my knees replaced. Such is life…

  • Scott

    I quite like the twisted crown. It’s a little subconsciously jarring, sort of like a brietling braclet, but somehow it works.

    • The crown reminds me of some Oris crowns.

  • BNABOD

    It is decent looking, the dial is nicely made, the case back even though silly about the story seems to also be well made and clean. Not sure what a hand cranked 2804 is worth but had a Laco once w one on it and I paid 700 bucks for it or maybe even less can’t recall so the price here is optimistic. Good luck

    • Assuming it’s a standard grande 2804, yes the watch’s overall price is a little aggressive. Not crazy, but not a super bargain either.

  • Marius

    I like the watch, but not the faux history. I just can’t see any point to it.

    For a moment, I thought it was a tribute to England and Wasps rugby player James “The Hask” Haskell. I suppose he might have demanded a few quid for the association, dead explorers not so much.

  • Jerry Mathers

    Gee Mrs. Cleaver, you’re looking especially vibrant this evening. Is young Theodore home perchance? I’d like to show him my new timepiece.

  • Linking this otherwise pretty well designed watch to the ill fated, poorly coordinated Scott expedition is not something that would make me want it. Let alone it feels forced as well.

  • spiceballs

    Nicely done I thought. Tidy presentation but hour/minute hands need more lume (IMO) otherwiie they’ll fast fade into the night. But because these look much like my Nite MX10 perhaps tritium tubes would be a better alternative?

  • Coert Welman

    The sand and white coloured models are absolutely gorgeous and the dimensions are very good as well, although 38/39 mm would have been even better.

    The price is a bit higher than I would have liked.

  • Jon Snow

    As Archie likes to say, a microshitter is still a shitter.

  • #The Deplorable Boogur T. Wang

    Nice try.
    Don’t care for the fake backstory.

    Wish them well – some will like their effort.

  • Ulysses31

    The blue one is gorgeous. A nice open dial, interesting way of presenting the date, and a subtly curving case profile.