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Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Ultra Light Watch Debuts New Titanium Case & Movement

Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Ultra Light Watch Debuts New Titanium Case & Movement Omega Seamaster Watch Releases

Crafted from an unworldly mixture of gamma titanium and ceramic, and powered by the brand’s first-ever titanium caliber, the Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Ultra Light is among the most expensive (at $48,600) and technologically advanced watches the brand has introduced in recent times. Featherweight in its construction and straightforward in its design, there is one serious price tag to go with the novelty factor.

Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Ultra Light Watch Debuts New Titanium Case & Movement Omega Seamaster Watch Releases

With the Seamaster Aqua Terra Ultra Light, Omega introduces a halo product that, for one, aptly showcases its advanced material know-how; it also allows fans of the brand to purchase into the debut of technological solutions we may (or may not) be seeing more widely available in future watch lines.

Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Ultra Light Watch Debuts New Titanium Case & Movement Omega Seamaster Watch Releases

The tie-in is with golf and Omega brand ambassador Rory McIlroy, who testifies to having contributed to the product development phases. The goal was to create a new Omega sport watch that is “ultra-light” and, therefore, is “an absolute pleasure to wear, whatever sport you play” — and combine all that with rugged construction.

The end result is a truly featherweight timepiece that, despite its mechanical movement and a fabric strap attached, weighs just 55 grams.

Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Ultra Light Watch Debuts New Titanium Case & Movement Omega Seamaster Watch Releases

Why is having a strap attached a big deal? Because when Richard Mille quoted the weight of its first ultra-lightweight watches — the RM 006 and RM 009 (anyone else remember these?) — impressive weights of 42 and 29 grams were quoted off the strap, just for the watch head. Now, the Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Ultra Light rests against the scales at just 55 grams with all its vital components attached — and that’s mighty impressive.

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Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Ultra Light Watch Debuts New Titanium Case & Movement Omega Seamaster Watch Releases

Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Ultra Light Watch Debuts New Titanium Case & Movement Omega Seamaster Watch Releases

The case is crafted from gamma titanium — more specifically, gamma titanium aluminide, which has excellent mechanical properties and oxidation- and corrosion-resistance at elevated temperatures (over 600° Celsius), rendering it a possible replacement for traditional superalloy components in, say, aircraft turbine engines. The idea of watch brands reaching for materials used in distinctly different scenarios is almost a base requirement if you want to play ball in the high-five-figure segment of high-tech watches. Richard Mille’s NTPT multi-layer carbon was originally developed for the masts of competitive sailing yachts, for example.

Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Ultra Light Watch Debuts New Titanium Case & Movement Omega Seamaster Watch Releases

I imagine a few more grams could have potentially been shaved off with the elimination of the telescopic crown — but never mind that, as this way we get to witness the debut of this cool new feature on an Omega watch. This push-in crown is introduced in an effort to add comfort during game-time, “ensuring that nothing gets in the way of your hands.” Frankly, I applaud the addition of this feature, as it, alongside the titanium movement that we’ll be looking at in a moment, implies Omega’s dedication to creating a watch ideal for wearing during sports activities. And if a near-$50k watch with a telescopic crown doesn’t move you, I won’t judge — but it would be cool to see such creature-comfort features on main collection pieces, wouldn’t it? Well, this is how those features often debut.

Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Ultra Light Watch Debuts New Titanium Case & Movement Omega Seamaster Watch Releases

The bezel is highly scratch-resistant ceramic, presented in a color unique to the Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Ultra Light. It has no graduations — although that certainly could have saved another fraction of a gram. I can also see why Omega wanted to keep this watch looking like a watch, and not a hollowed-out thing.

Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Ultra Light Watch Debuts New Titanium Case & Movement Omega Seamaster Watch Releases

I have always appreciated how Omega sometimes labels main components of its watches with the material said components were crafted from. Now, for the first time I can remember, not only does the dial say, “Ti” for titanium (which we’ve seen before), but it also indicates the Omega 8928 Master Chronometer caliber. Now that is proper dedication to weight-saving.

Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Ultra Light Watch Debuts New Titanium Case & Movement Omega Seamaster Watch Releases

All the bridges and plates are in ceramicized titanium which, according to Omega, means “there’s less friction between the components.” Given the uncompromising use of low-friction, synthetic jewels for every important, high-friction fitting inside modern wristwatch movements, I am not sure at what point do the ceramicized titanium plates make a difference in reducing friction. On the upside of things, the Omega Caliber 8928 Titanium is a Master Chronometer, meaning it can resist magnetic fields as strong as 15,000 Gauss — and, of course, it comes with a co-axial escapement. Omega designed Caliber 8928 without an automatic winding system, most certainly to further reduce overall weight and heft.

Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Ultra Light Watch Debuts New Titanium Case & Movement Omega Seamaster Watch Releases

The series-coupled, double-barrel movement offers 72 hours of power reserve and is displayed on the caseback of the Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Ultra Light. Since we’ve mentioned the much, much more expensive purveyor of lightweight watches, Richard Mille, we should note that RM also has its movements crafted from titanium to keep weight at a minimum. That said, titanium movements (and high-end movements crafted from any material other than brass) are truly extremely rare.

Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Ultra Light Watch Debuts New Titanium Case & Movement Omega Seamaster Watch Releases

Available with red, green, or blue-colored accents, the Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Ultra Light is priced at $48,600, positioning it well in the realm of halo watches. A new base material, a new movement expensively crafted in titanium, some new features, and an overall lack of compromise render the cost of this bold new, ultra-light Omega that much more understandable — if not any more affordable. Let us all start scouting omegawatches.com in hopes of these features making it into the main Aqua Terra collection soon.

 

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  • Jared

    way overpriced

    • Mikita

      Two ways overpriced.

  • Gokart Mozart

    Unrelated, but you have had Fortis advertising on this website recently, but I can’t remember reading a review of one on this site in absolutely ages.

    Can you please do a review of a Fortis. It is also a space watch, just for the record. It seems some people forget that.

    • Mikita

      “Can you please do a review of a Fortis. It is also a space watch, just for the record.”

      Exactly! They just can’t compete with Swatch Group at pumping money into marketing.

  • I love the Aqua Terra line but these “futuristic/modern” versions look totally wrong for the style. They should have just designed it from scratch as a totally new model.

  • Raymond Wilkie

    How much of the product development phase did Rory McIlroy have apart from remembering to put it on before he Teed off. My guess is none.

    • Joe

      It’s a relief it’s not signed “Rory McIlroy” on the dial or on the movement.
      Having said that at this price they might as well have done that because so few people will buy one anyway.

  • Sheez Gagoo

    While a fan of new technologies and stuff, this watch has the charme and the appearance of a neon light bulb in a parking house. Altough the impressive and hand wound movement seemes to be top notch, the way they finished it looks way to sterile. The pricing seemes to be way more from outer space than the Speedmaster on Armstrongs wrist.

  • Independent_George

    I dig it, though I hope, in future models, they brighten up the dial, because as it stands right now, it’s Rory McIlroy staring in Too Many Shades of Gray, coming to a Boutique near you.

  • PowNation

    I get it, high price helps absorb some of the development costs. Unfortunately, Omega will have a hard time moving more than a few hundred pieces at this price point.

    As a halo watch, it will help entice folks to make a visit to their nearest Omega retailer. I certainly look forward to trying it on my wrist… if retailers will allow such a watch to be touched. Eventually when prices come down to reality for average folks like myself, it will be a compelling purchase option to compliment an active lifestyle.

  • dr3

    Price laughable.

  • Joe

    Other than the overly-protected crown, it’s a decent-looking watch.
    I thought I might see it priced at $6,000, possibly a little more.

    At $48,000 this would probably be last on my list of watches at that money.

    Ultimately it makes no more sense (to me) than to put a tourbillon in a sports watch (which RM does just to show that they can).
    Also, other than weight-saving antics, I don’t see this movement with any extra shock protection.
    I know that Ti tends to have improved shock absorbing properties compared to say Al, but that’s mostly on a larger scale such as bicycle frames.

    RM seem to have shock absorption designed into their watches. The Omega may be comparably affordable but other than an interesting case material it doesn’t seem to be in the same league…at least imo.

    Interesting times.

  • Federico Mengoli

    Price can’t be real. It’s probably a joke for the April fool…. Wait… Isn’t yet the 1st April?

    • Independent_George

      Think of it as an affordable, better looking alternative to a Richard Mille, with more interesting tech.

  • PR

    I would’ve absolutely bought this watch without the trailing zero. It’s good to see a lightweight sports watch with a mechanical movement that’s focused on fit and weight rather than bling.

    But I cannot comprehend the development or material costs being so high as to want to price this beyond reason. Maybe eventually this experiment will move to more affordable ranges

  • john wood

    Fugly

  • Expat

    LOL @ the price….

  • H.S.M.

    At this point I would pull the trigger rather on the Zenith Defy than this for way less. That is way more forward thinking in terms of technology.
    Granted, this is pretty amazing az well, but with the same old escapement, etc…

    Now if someone would put this and the Defy together.

    And I get it. It’s light. So is one’s wallet after paying for it.

    Also I don’t like that hidden crown.

  • Timestandsstill

    Say what you will but you won’t see Rolex pushing the envelope like this. I applaud them for developing some of this technology and I’m sure it definitely will filter down to more affordably priced watches sooner or later. And I doubt that they really do expect to sell a lot of these. A halo product is exactly what it is.

  • WINKS

    At most should be a third of that list price. Impressively boring looking, uninspired design.

  • gw01

    Love the daring design and them pushing the envelope on design. Don’t see this is worth more than a Royal Oak Chronograph + a new Daytona.

  • Mikita

    $50k watch looking like $1k watch – great achievement!

  • Gokart Mozart

    I would definetly go for the FPJ

  • Lucifer Luv

    I like this watch classy and modest. It reminds me a little bit the Rolex Air King, which is also ‘my’ favorite Rolex.

  • Ulysses31

    Impressive and sleek, although at first glance I thought I was looking at another version of the Victorinox INOX. This watch doesn’t really “look” expensive. The goal of lightness has been achieved, but it feels like a solution in search of a problem. For the price, i’d want my watch to be more of a peacock, than a peahen.

  • SuperStrapper

    They actually just take thier watch off to play golf and tennis.

  • William

    It’s enough to swim with, and that’s likely all anyone will be doing with the watch.

  • BNABOD

    So ok it is light and weight for it 😉 super expensive …..awesome. Someone has to shell out the cash for development cost and of course to pay Rory and while I have no doubt Omega did it’s market research to come up w ahem 48k I just don’t see anyone in their right mind shelling that kind of dough for an AT. It just isn’t special enough and maybe a new collection should have been started when there are already 8000 different AT models ….maybe shove that movement in a speedy ?

    • Gokart Mozart

      As if there are not already enough speeds…

      • BNABOD

        True but at least the movement would have evolved since 1960 …

  • Daniel Harper

    Wow. I’m super impressed and would totally buy this bad boy if it had a regular old coaxial movement for 5k, but in the 50k bracket I’d probably go with something else.

  • I have a weight statement word Mr Swiss_Cheese. It’s G-Shock’s Pilot Carbon Core Guard GWR B1000 series, the watch head + Carbon fiber strap weighs 72g and Casio uses the term “Gravitymaster”

    • SuperStrapper

      Ok…?

  • Gokart Mozart

    Hmm, I wonder which one to go for….

  • Gokart Mozart

    That is a rubbish looking crown, in or out. It is out of proportion with the rest of the watch.

    What is the point of having a crown guard for a retractable crown? Absolutely stupid!

    It’s like putting bull bars on a ferrari. And the tiny crown is like putting 15 Inch alloys on the same Ferrari.

    Please do not let retractable crowns be a thing if they are going to look so bad or come with a crown guard.

  • Berndt Norten

    I’d settle for nothing less than Krug.

  • Mikita

    Omega, Breitling, IWC also encased ETA at some point.

  • Tom Erne

    I totally love this watch! So cool and understated while pushing boundaries. It’s all but a safe bet, and it’s showing off some pretty serious technical skills.
    To bad most of the the discussions evolves only around the high price tag. Had it been an RM or AP it would have been considered cheap.
    I wish Omega all the best in their endeavours to push themselves further up the ladder. No doubt they have the capabilities, if only also the public will learn to accept and respect them for more than speedies and seamasters only.

  • Reprobus Marmaritarum

    I like the Aqua Terra range but this one’s a bit bland and OH MY GOD IS THAT THE PRICE????
    Well that’s modern professional golf for you. Sleek, a bit boring and massively over-valued.

  • Gokart Mozart

    If its retracted it should not need a crown guard. There should be no crown to protect.

  • Have you tried machining titanium?

  • If this would have been a RM it would have cost an order of magnitude more while being much flashier for the sake of it and ultimately uglier. Just saying.

  • Roboto

    Has Omega lost its grip on reality? I’m all for flagship, innovative, technology pushing efforts but my gosh if this is what the brand stands for, they are lost.

  • Titanium is pretty hard and hazardous to machine. I nearly set the shop on fire once while turning some precision shafts.

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