Marvin Malton Cushion M119 Watch Review

Marvin Malton Cushion M119 Watch Review

Marvin Malton Cushion M119 Watch Review   wrist time watch reviews

Marvin watches can trace their history back as far as 1850 and the Marvin name has been on the books at the Federal Institute of Intellectual Property in Berne, Switzerland since 1893. Marvin has an interesting and notable history which eventually saw the brand joining the MSR group (Manufactures d'Horlogeries Suisses Réunies) in the 70's before essentially disappearing altogether. Fast forward to 2002 and the Marvin name was relaunched after being purchased from MSR by Jean-Daniel Maye and his wife Cecile. The Mayes were apparently attracted to the history of the brand and sought to resurrect Marvin, wiping its name from the list of casualties claimed by the quartz revolution. Over the past few years we have shown you a series of interesting and noteworthy Marvin models, and today we add to that list with the Marvin Malton Cushion M119.

Marvin Malton Cushion M119 Watch Review   wrist time watch reviews

Marvin Malton Cushion M119 Watch Review   wrist time watch reviews

This specific variant of the M119 is the M119.23.24.84, but it is easily distinguished from its siblings thanks to its bold combination of a PVD case and a bright white dial with black markers. While there are many versions of the M119, this one offers huge wrist presence for a watch with a 42mm case. The cushion case lies somewhere in the overlap between a Panerai Radiomir and a Tag Heuer Monaco with short lugs, a slim bezel and a thickness of just 11.5 mm. The case is really nice, exhibiting a mix of polished and brushed elements and small details like the heritage marking on the left flank and the display case back offering a view of the movement within. The case finishing is excellent and the design is very detail-driven and one that highlights the fairly complex shape in a luxurious and interesting way.

Marvin Malton Cushion M119 Watch Review   wrist time watch reviews

Marvin Malton Cushion M119 Watch Review   wrist time watch reviews

The dial, along with its punchy white coloring, is fantastic and likely the single best element of the M119 line. Beautifully detailed to catch the light, the dial is decorated with a crosshatch design that serves as the platform for the matte black inlaid markers which perfectly accent the finishing on the case. The hands are done in gloss black but their simple and minimal shape matches nicely with the markers used for all of the odd numbers in the main display. The black ring, which sits inside the radius of the chapter ring, shows a simple 24 hour display and the chapter ring offers a minute track in a minimal and legible typeface. Finally, the date display is situated in place of the six o'clock marker and offers a color matched black text on a white date wheel, excellent attention to detail here. Dial script is minimal with the name plate and logo below 12 and "automatic" printed above the date display. While I could do without the "automatic" text, Marvin also makes a quartz version within the same family of watches, so I suppose the distinction is worth noting. The Malton Cushion range offers a number of dial designs with the M119 range being the most casual design of the three-hand models. Alternate options within the M119 range include an open-heart dial and a series of varied color choices.

Marvin Malton Cushion M119 Watch Review   wrist time watch reviews

Viewable via the display case back, the Marvin M119 is powered by the Sellita SW 200 movement. Attentive readers will recognize this movement as the preferred stand-in for the ETA 2824-2. The SW 200 is a perfectly capable clone of the 2824 and has even been used interchangeably by Tag Heuer as the base for their Caliber 5 movement. Offering a power reserve of 36 hours, this movement relies on 26 jewels and beats at 28, 800 vph (4 Hz).  In the M119, Marvin adds a signed rotor and timekeeping was seen to be reliable and without issue.

Marvin Malton Cushion M119 Watch Review   wrist time watch reviews

Marvin Malton Cushion M119 Watch Review   wrist time watch reviews

The Malton M119.23.24.84 comes fitted with a perforated black leather strap with a bright red liner. The strap is soft, very comfortable and even comes fitted with quick-release spring bars (no tools needed). The strap suits the watch nicely thanks to contrast stitching and a matching PVD treated and signed buckle. If the leather strap is not your preference, there are other models of the M119 that come on an attractive stainless steel bracelet. I for one would love to see additional straps available directly from Mavin as the included strap is better than I expected at this price point and the quick-release spring bar encourages strap changes.

Marvin Malton Cushion M119 Watch Review   wrist time watch reviews

On wrist, the M119 is comfortable and easy to wear thanks to a total weight of just 99 grams. While certainly sporty on the perforated strap, I also found the M119 to work well with a simple black nato strap or brown leather straps, providing the shade was not too dark. The detailed case design and white on black should dress up nicely with a black alligator strap and may even play well with a casual suit. Being a forward thinking brand with fresh management, Marvin offers a full online shop and the Malton Cushion M119 range is priced from $1380 to $1690 USD with the M1119.23.24.84 carrying a list price of $1580 USD. While the $1500 price range is stacked for competition from Victorinox, Hamilton, entry level Tag Heuers and many more, I think Marvin is definitely worth a close look as the M119 is a lovely watch that is perfectly sized, excellently detailed and a treat to wear.

Necessary Data
>Brand:  Marvin
>Model:  Malton Cushion M119.23.24.84
>Price: $1580 USD
>Would reviewer personally wear it: Yes
>Friend we'd recommend it to first: The guy that wants a distinctive watch that can be worn in most situations and will appreciate the fine details and automatic movement
>Worst characteristic of watch: The limited luminous material on the hands
>Best characteristic of watch: The beautiful textured dial and inlaid markers.

Written by James Stacey

16 comments
ZL
ZL

Like.

DG Cayse
DG Cayse

Good review Mr. Stacey. I share your enthusiasm for this model. Good attention to details and a subtle but very legible dial read.

I like the texture on the dial face and 'heritage' markings on the case. Good choice in the Sellita movement. Firmly established as a quality dependable motor.

About the lume, or lack of it. Adding T25, or even T100 tubes, to the stick markers would just set this off heads above the average.,

Heck, I even like the look of the see-through back. Nice clean, uncluttered detailing on the rotor. Well done Marvin. 

Junk_Seller
Junk_Seller

@jamesstacey @aBlogtoWatch Lovely watch.

Ulysses31
Ulysses31

I wasn't joking.  I'd love to know why there are only 48 minutes on the minute chapter ring.  All Malton watches seem to have this while others in the Marvin range don't.  Is there some historical significance to that number?  Been driving me nuts.

SuperStrapper
SuperStrapper

Very handsome, I would happily have this in the collection. $1500 doesn't require a lot of consideration either: its not throwaway money, but still highly digestible. The constrast is about the best there is, really remarkable. It would fit in nicely with a suit and shirt with no tie I think: that would be my application anyway. Too gormal to be all that sporty, and no dress watch.

Interesting how the 8 numeral is black, but the tiny 40 minute mark is done in red. Now its not the number 8 they accent, but it's position on the dial. Methinks that might actually be a bit of a mistake, if they really sat down and thought about it.

Regardless, this is a winner, even ranked against the peers mentioned. They have attractive pieces in this range for sure, but not that have this look.

Ulysses31
Ulysses31

Do want, a thousand times.  So much to like about this watch, from the use of multiple finishes to the great legibility, robust looking case, nice strap that adds a discreet dash of colour.  Hmm, there must be sixteen-hundred bucks down the back of the sofa somewhere...

jstacey
jstacey

DG Cayse Thanks for reading the review, I am very glad you enjoyed it.

jstacey
jstacey

@DG Cayse Thanks for reading the review, I am very glad you enjoyed it. I agree about the lume but wonder if the inclusion of gas tubes might increase the thickness of the watch to account for the thicker hands. The hand style on the M119 is not much of a platform for luminous paint, that is for sure.

nateb123
nateb123

@Ulysses31 It has 48 minutes because someone screwed up.  The open heart version of the Malton Cushion doesn't have it either.

I don't see what's so great about it though.  I'd rather get a Hamilton Jazzmaster Cushion.  ETA movement instead of a Sellita for 700 dollars less, and it was never very popular so more like 900 less.  A Tissot T-Lord is about the same as well so whatever that price difference is buying is not at all apparent to me.

jstacey
jstacey

@Kris C You have a keen eye, I had this watch for a couple of days before I noticed the red "40". Nicely done.

SuperStrapper
SuperStrapper

Word of the day: gormal. Its perfectly cromulent.

Ulysses31
Ulysses31

Just don't try to count how many minutes there are.

DG Cayse
DG Cayse

@jstacey @DG Cayse Goof points. And the addition of Tritium, which I greatly like, would, no doubt, also increase the price to the end client. Trade offs all. Better lume, perhaps C3 on the stick markers, would greatly benefit an this great design. I also like the inclusion of the 24 hr mil time numbers.

SuperStrapper
SuperStrapper

@jstacey while not on every model, Marvin is somewhat known (to me, at least) to use red on the 8 marker: be it the numeral 8, or just the marker (baton, etc) at the 8 position. I believe even on their jump (or was it wandering...) Hour watch, when the 8 came around it was red. I notice that for a fairly basic and selfish reason: I'm one of the rare birds that has little-to-no appreciation for the colour red. I'm just not a fan, and unfortunate for me, the watch lover, 95+% of watches that use an accent colour turn to red. My thought is that it is the easy answer, because sometimes the little dab of red undermines the entire rest of the palette, adding it even though it does not compliment, or even clashes with the rest of the watch. Marvin generally gets a pass on that offence, as they've generally always used red strap liners and colour options that are complimentary, or at least condusive to red.

So, when the title of today's post came up, one of my first thoughts was 'it'll be nice, and then ruined for me with a blob of taunting red'. I was refreshed to see the numeral 8 spared of this fate, and then confused to see the '40' picked on instead. Maybe they've done it before; I'm no expert, just thought it was interesting enough to warrant a comment.