Rolex Begins Using Silicon “Syloxi” Hairsprings In Caliber 2236 Watch Movements

Rolex Begins Using Silicon “Syloxi” Hairsprings In Caliber 2236 Watch Movements

Rolex Begins Using Silicon Syloxi Hairsprings In Caliber 2236 Watch Movements   watch industry news

Rolex has been one of the most interesting brands to reveal new things here at Baselworld 2014 – but only if you look really closely. Sure the new Sea-Dweller and “Pepsi bezel” GMT-Master II are lovely looking, but in my opinion the most interesting items of news are found in the minor details which are part of the new watches. For instance, almost hidden as part of a ladies watch is a new piece of Rolex technology known as Syloxi – which is essentially a silicon (silicium) hairspring.

Yes, that is right: for 2014, Rolex has begun to use silicon hairsprings, a technology that they have been working on for over a decade, but have only now decided to incorporate into a watch. It was only several years ago, in the year 2000, that Rolex introduced their “paramagnetic” Parachrom hairspring that is an exotic alloy of metals. As of 2014 the Syloxi silicon hairsprings will not replace Parachrom hairsprings, but will rather sit side by side them in a different range of  watches.

Rolex Begins Using Silicon Syloxi Hairsprings In Caliber 2236 Watch Movements   watch industry news

Rolex Begins Using Silicon Syloxi Hairsprings In Caliber 2236 Watch Movements   watch industry news

Rolex seems to suggest that for the time being the more advanced Syloxi hairsprings will have life in their ladies watches – beginning with these new jewelry versions of the Oyster Perpetual Datejust Pearlmaster 34 watch. Normally I would never suspect that a precious stone-laden timepiece for women would be how Rolex debuts a new technology. In fact, one might argue that 2014 is really about Rolex intentionally doing things that people would never be able to predict.

While women’s watches will contain the Syloxi hairsping, Rolex seems to suggest that their men’s models (for now) will continue to use the Parachrom hairspring. Specifically, Syloxi has been introduced in the Rolex in-house made calibre 2236 automatic movement. Rolex says that the silicon hairspring has even allowed for an increased power reserve of 55 hours (adding about 6 hours over the traditional hairspring).

Rolex Begins Using Silicon Syloxi Hairsprings In Caliber 2236 Watch Movements   watch industry news

Rolex Begins Using Silicon Syloxi Hairsprings In Caliber 2236 Watch Movements   watch industry news

So these images are of two of the new Datejust Pearlmaster 34 watches that will contain the calibre 2236 movement. The Pearlmaster version of the Datejust has a unique bracelet and some other distinct features. Of course those features often include precious stone decoration and precious metal case and bracelet construction. Unsurprisingly the Datejust Pearlmaster 34 for 2014 will come in 18k yellow, white, or rose gold. The white gold version comes master with sapphires, the yellow gold version with diamonds, and the rose gold (Everose) version with rubies. All of the models have fully diamond set dials.

As a jewelry watch there is a lot to appreciate. For instance the dials are hand-set with diamonds before the hour markers are applied. If you look closely at the bezels you’ll notice that Rolex selects slightly darker stones at each hour marker point. Of course all the stones are of excellent quality and hand-set by Rolex in-house. Each of these Pearlmaster watches comes with an option diamond-set bracelet as well.

Rolex Begins Using Silicon Syloxi Hairsprings In Caliber 2236 Watch Movements   watch industry news

Rolex Begins Using Silicon Syloxi Hairsprings In Caliber 2236 Watch Movements   watch industry news

There is no doubting that these are strictly ladies watches and to opt for this collection to debut a new piece of movement technology is a strange thing as women are traditionally not the key demographic to be interested in the details and performance of a watch movement. Nevertheless Rolex has incorporated Syloxi in the 2236 and it is unclear exactly how they will roll-out the technology into future timepieces.

Why silicon? Well the nature of silicon means that it does not require lubrication, is not effected by changes in temperature, does not react to magnetism, and is extremely stable. These are all benefits over traditional metal hairsprings. It was long believed that Rolex would never adopt silicon for use in their hairsprings even though it was known they had the technology to do so. Does anything make their silicon hairsprings different from those offered by other brands? According to Rolex yes. The Syloxi hairspring is covered by a number of patents, related to how it is produced, to how the hairspring is attached to the balance wheel. Rolex seems to promise that these are probably the best performing hairsprings they offer (and of course the 2236 movement is COSC Chronometer certified). While the Oyster Perpetual Datejust Pearlmaster 34 watches are high-end ladies pieces, it is possible that Syloxi will find its way into other Rolex models soon. rolex.com

15 comments
dimatha
dimatha

In a mans watch we would get some feedback how is the new hairspring performing in precision, now we will never do :(

SAYSAY
SAYSAY

I wish Omega would catch up and use Silicium!! They are always steps behind in innovation and design!

spiceballs
spiceballs

Bling pressure from the nouveau-riche Chinese?  Nice hairspring innovation but as someone else suggested 80 hour (or longer) auto power reserve (like the featured TH CH80) would be more welcome.  Are Rolex losing the plot?

antjay
antjay

It's about time someone brought out a Lierace commemorative . Nice one Rolex !

stefanv
stefanv

Somehow, these two watches remind me of Tudor's red and blue Black Bays, in make-up.

SuperStrapper
SuperStrapper

Syloxi Blues. 


These datejust abortions... cannot unsee. 

witchwatch
witchwatch

"In fact, one might argue that 2014 is really about Rolex intentionally doing things that people would never be able to predict.".


This is it exactly. Why on earth are they releasing this new tech in a woman's watch otherwise? I mean you would expect to see in a DD at least no? I have a theory it might be to act as a beta test.

Ulysses31
Ulysses31

That frosty blue and silver one looks pretty nice, the others... just no.  I'm assuming "Syloxi" is just another name for what is basically the same thing Omega already uses?  Trifling differences aside of course.  Do they ever publish any facts and figures on how much accuracy and durability is improved by using these new hair-springs, or are we just meant to take their word for it that it is tangibly "better"?  That's an honest question by the way.  I'd guess this new feature would come at some extra cost and so am wondering if the premium would be proportional to the benefit provided.  I'm not that surprised they'd début the feature in women's watches first, after all I think most women who wear watches don't have time to be as anal about certain features as men and the increased power reserve and decreased need for maintenance would be therefore be more convenient in day-to-day use.

Lkcons
Lkcons

@Ulysses31  Once again in so many days an injustice to a (somewhat) interesting innovation? The blue and silver is maybe still passable, but the other one? Terrible

dimatha
dimatha

@stefanv @dimatha  non of the women buying such a jewel watch would bother about precise timekeeping and how many secs per week is gaining or losing.

dimatha
dimatha

@stefanv @dimatha  I think I have the answer why Syloxi on womens watches! 
It is made out of silicone, and women are used to pay big money for "silicone"! ;)

stefanv
stefanv

@dimatha @stefanv  You might be right. I know plenty of women who would care about such technicalities (most of my female co-workers are engineers or mathematicians), but none of them would buy a watch like this.

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