Tutima Patria Watch Hands-On

Tutima Patria Watch Hands-On

Tutima Patria Watch Hands On   hands on

Do you know what happened to Glashutte-based watch brand Tutima over the last few years? They underwent a major corporate pivot and completely changed their entire production of watches and also replaced all the ETA movements they used to use with in-house made movements. Yeah, and they did all this in a relatively short period of time. To announce this fact, they released the in-house made Homage Minute Repeater not too long ago in 2011. It was not until 2013 however that we saw what else they would be making. This is a hands-on look at the Tutima Patria, which no doubt is part of their more conservative watch collection.

Tutima Patria Watch Hands On   hands on

Glashutte, Germany is home to watch brands such as Glashutte Original (of course), A. Lange & Sohne, Nomos, and Tutima (among others). It has a long history of great German watch design, as well as making movements in-house. While Tutima is still focused on mostly durable sport watches, the Patria represents a more classic side of the brand. Its design is actually inspired by the Homage Minute Repeater, from case to dial, as well as the movement. Though, it just displays the time or two time zones depending on the model.

While there is a strict three-hand version of the Patria, there is also a dual-time version which is pretty slick. Inside of the subsidiary seconds dial is a second hand in blue used as an hour hand for a second timezone. The Patria collection has models with dials that have either baton hour markers or Arabic numeral hour markers. It seems fitting that if you get into a watch like this you opt for the dual time zone Patria as it is more unique. There are certainly no shortages of simple three-hand, small second timepieces.

Tutima Patria Watch Hands On   hands on

11 comments
spiceballs
spiceballs

Didn't know that about Tutima - thx.  Its going to be a hard row for them to hoe and I'm not sure that this is the best start but I wish them the best of luck.

AlbertoPerez
AlbertoPerez

I wish them luck, (they will need)

 Its like buying a $ 70,000 Hyundai...

aleximd2000
aleximd2000

at this price i want to see the time in the night not just blinking as blind mice in the dark

the upper half of the ial looks like  - hey there are plenty of tennis courts vacant!!!!

Ryan B
Ryan B

Even in gold 20K is kinda steep and that seems to be the general consensus here. Moving past that I am a huge sucker for in-house movements and are excited to see where they go with this in the future. Their minute repeater is a beautiful creation which shows exactly what they're capable of.

SuperStrapper
SuperStrapper

This is most un-Tutima Tutima I've ever seen. maybe it;s just me, but when i think of the brand I envision attractive pilot-style deals with nice coin-edge bezels. 


They could have stuck with that mantra while just upping the movements to the new proprietary stuff. I'm not a fan of this direction. 

GBD
GBD

I like a lot of Tutima models, and good for them for producing their own movement. At $20K, though, the price puts them with some stiff competition. 

With ETA movements drying up, I'm waiting to see which Swiss watchmaker *isn't* going to use it as an excuse to gouge customers. In-house movements are great, but will any of them use it as a value proposition, instead of a way to move their brands (and prices) way upmarket? I hope so, but I think they'll be the rare exception. 

MikeinFrankfurt
MikeinFrankfurt

At roughly $20K, this would not come close to hitting my radar...in-house movement or not.  There are just too many options at this price from makers with better reputations, etc.  Furthermore, the hand design looks relatively unsophisticated and while I enjoy an uncluttered dial, this seems damn empty in the upper half despite the signage.

IMO, if Tutima wants to follow in the steps of the other players in their area, take a lesson from the stunning blue dials on the Glashutte Senator Sixties...


Ulysses31
Ulysses31

Ah, Tutima.  A quality brand that unfairly flies under most people's radar.  It's not the nicest Tutima i've seen though.  The dial is just too plain and the movement, while lovely, doesn't really justify that price.  They should work up to that price level, not jump straight in.

Grinnie Jax
Grinnie Jax

I was reading, gazing at the watch and thinking "What a nice Tutima! New step in their evolution" until I got struck with its price... $20,000. No, Tutima, just no.

If German then Glashütte for this price range.

nateb123
nateb123

It seems silly but Tutima needs to redesign their logo and 80s font if they want to pull this off.  I like everything else about it, even the stoic design, but especially that movement that looks like a combination of a Dornblueth and Sohn and FP Journe.  The only thing standing between this watch and the wrists of watch lovers everywhere is their branding.

MarkCarson
MarkCarson

First off, I like them. But.....the dial on the dual time is just too austere. Even the small seconds model has some relief on the dial. The second time display could use a discrete AM/PM display. And since these are manual winders, how about a power reserve indication on each of them? Just being picky here as I do like them and they are very German looking. I will be more interested to see where other models (in steel) will be priced. At these prices, there is lots of competition.