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Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Ultra-Thin Minute Repeater Flying Tourbillon Hybris Mechanica 11 Hands-On

Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Ultra-Thin Minute Repeater Flying Tourbillon Hybris Mechanica 11 Hands-On Hands-On

There is something effortlessly cool about a thin, classy, elegant watch fitted with top-tier complications and the Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Ultra-Thin Minute Repeater Flying Tourbillon Hybris Mechanica 11 is just that – and a long name.

Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Ultra-Thin Minute Repeater Flying Tourbillon Hybris Mechanica 11 Hands-On Hands-On

All images by Ariel Adams

Thin watches are in. “They’ve always been in!” – you could argue, and you’d be right, but it is only lately that we’ve seen a notable rise in their popularity as a weapon of choice among manufactures. Prime examples to both types are Jaeger-LeCoultre and Bulgari. Where finishing and tourbillons and complex chimes brands struggle to explain (and are often at odds with explaining what a tourbillon is and does, with “it defies gravity” being an absolute pet peeve of mine), thinness everybody understands. Everybody with the slightest inclination for watchmaking gets that there must be something particularly challenging to making a watch thin, thinner, thinnest. Hybris Mechanica is Jaeger-LeCoultre’s line of watches dedicated to horological muscle flexin’, and the Master Ultra-Thin Minute Repeater Flying Tourbillon is one of the latest pieces introduced in it, although it made its debut back at SIHH 2014. I saw the watch at another SIHH briefly, but it was Ariel who took these shots at Watches & Wonders 2018. We wish more brands would carry their halo pieces from previous years to shows as it’d be great to see these impressive models, developed at great effort and cost.

At the time of its release, the Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Ultra-Thin Minute Repeater Flying Tourbillon Hybris Mechanica 11 was the thinnest watch to combine automatic winding, tourbillon, and minute repeater – and I don’t think that record has been broken by anyone in the last 4 years, not even with Bulgari pushing the limits of thinnest automatic watch, thinnest minute repeater, and thinnest tourbillon with its Octo Finissimo line of watches. Impressive work there… Where were we again?

Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Ultra-Thin Minute Repeater Flying Tourbillon Hybris Mechanica 11 Hands-On Hands-On

The JLC 362 caliber is composed from a total of 471 parts that come together in a movement that is just 4.8mm thick and 33.3mm wide… I mean, it was 471 parts in the original JLC documents in 2014, but now their website says 566 components. Not sure how or why these numbers inflated over years but hey, it’s good to know there’s a ~5% annual inflation rate in haute horlogerie movement component counts. Nevertheless, the case somehow could accommodate the higher number of parts and remains 41mm wide and 7.9mm thick, which, again, is a record for a watch with this combination of complications. The 18k white gold Master case with its unassuming, if not a bit stale, round bezel and short, stubby lugs creates the perfect underwhelming frame to imply “Hey, you! Look inside the case, not at it!” Look inside the case – at the dial, its openings, its tourbillon, or even just the dial itself – one consequently does and the real Hybris Mechanica fireworks begin.

Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Ultra-Thin Minute Repeater Flying Tourbillon Hybris Mechanica 11 Hands-On Hands-On

Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Ultra-Thin Minute Repeater Flying Tourbillon Hybris Mechanica 11 Hands-On Hands-On

To keep the thickness at its minimum, Jaeger-LeCoultre designed the 362 caliber with a peripheral winding rotor that they, adding yet another twist, placed on the dial side. To show this feat off – and for another reason we’ll discuss soon enough – the dial features 12 cut-outs or openings that allow the wearer to witness the peripheral rotor frantically wonder around the dial as one moves his or her hand. We have seen Perrelets and Romain Jeromes (among others) engineer solutions to show off the movement of the winding rotor, but what JLC did here certainly is the more elegant design.

Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Ultra-Thin Minute Repeater Flying Tourbillon Hybris Mechanica 11 Hands-On Hands-On

Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Ultra-Thin Minute Repeater Flying Tourbillon Hybris Mechanica 11 Hands-On Hands-On

The other reason for the cut-outs is acoustics: this way, when the rotor is not over them, the gongs that wrap around the movement and are struck by the hammers of the chiming mechanism are exposed, letting sound through the dial and making the chimes that much more audible. Speaking of the chime: the minute repeater retains a well-earned position among the most challenging and complex horological complications – but this, apparently, couldn’t keep JLC’s watchmakers and engineers away from fiddling with it through yet another twist. Whereas the minute repeater starting by a pusher rather than a slider already is a twist, they even engineered a small slider into the same side of the case that allows the wearer to deploy the pusher when he intends to use the chime. When not in use, the pusher remains pushed in after it’s been used – and it is only after the slider was put to use that the pusher is delivered to the discerning wearer. An impressive feature designed to further improve on the wearing experience – and further complicate the minute repeater.

Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Ultra-Thin Minute Repeater Flying Tourbillon Hybris Mechanica 11 Hands-On Hands-On

In case all this wasn’t enough, there also is a flying tourbillon on the dial, adding another source of animation beyond the partially displayed peripheral winding rotor. Although the piece Ariel photographed certainly is a showpiece, I think we’ll agree that a lot of time has passed since 2014 and perhaps a touching-up would’ve come a long way in making this caliber and the entire watch look as good as it should. Plenty of scratches and lint were on show on many parts of the movement and dial side – but, again, this being a showpiece is of course much less of an issue than if it were a customer piece. All this said, the “JL” logo on the tourbillon cage and the blue overcoil spring are all very cool indeed.

Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Ultra-Thin Minute Repeater Flying Tourbillon Hybris Mechanica 11 Hands-On Hands-On

Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Ultra-Thin Minute Repeater Flying Tourbillon Hybris Mechanica 11 Hands-On Hands-On

As expected, the movement side exhibits the sort of decorations usually found in a big brand’s halo exercise: beautifully curved anglage with polished edges and countersinks tease the eye. I can’t, however, get over the lack of beveled edges on the wheels on a $400,000 watch. Hand-beveled spokes should be as elemental a part of decorations as are anglage and blued screws – the independents shouldn’t be given this edge if the “Grande Maisons” want to stay on top of their game. I’m sure they too have (or could have) the talent in-house.

Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Ultra-Thin Minute Repeater Flying Tourbillon Hybris Mechanica 11 Hands-On Hands-On

Nevertheless, the movement layout is another aspect where Jaeger-LeCoultre showcases its experience in design: although it is a rather arbitrary coming together of bridges and cocks, it nevertheless is an impressive balancing act between traditional and modern shapes. A neat treat is to see the tiny wheel that drives the tourbillon at the lower end of the movement. To witness the drive coming from the two barrels through the going train all the way to the tourbillon is just a heart-warming sight for any watch lover.

Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Ultra-Thin Minute Repeater Flying Tourbillon Hybris Mechanica 11 Hands-On Hands-On

In summary, the 11th chapter in the Hybris Mechanica collection marks yet another impressive technical achievement by the “Grande Maison,” but it too carries a few weird, though not at all uncommon properties such as a stratospheric price, a relatively stratospheric limited edition number at 75 made, and some strange, although I’m sure well-considered “oversights” in finishing – mainly on the wheels. Yes, I know and I’ll admit, it is true that we’ve been spoiled by indies when it comes to next level movement decorations. I blame Grönefeld, Hajime Asaoka, and Bexei for that… I just can’t help but think that JLC could one-up everyone there if they really wanted to.

Last price we know for the Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Ultra-Thin Minute Repeater Flying Tourbillon Hybris Mechanica 11 is around $400,000. jaeger-lecoultre.com

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Comments

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  • Joe

    Very nice review, although I don’t like the visible rotor. I was initially “misled” into thinking this might be some calendar feature of the watch where in actual fact it turns out to be a rotor. If I could see some super geneva stripes or some high level of finishing (not just something that appears industrial), my opinion might change.

    Totally agree with the lack of edge bevelling on the wheels. On a $400k watch, you would expect the works.
    Nomos can do it as well as (of course) Voutilainen, Montblanc/Minerva, JLC…

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/7569a345cabdb6d8211fbafcffe15f5eed20d5dbcb9582e7d1e79e4bd5c225c9.jpg
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/e173709875e3f69771025fbdbbd0ccac34f09b3c7f912f1f011ad164a2efa5cd.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/30768ea16e437f3f851602cf581c2cf6028dcdd1b887b4c37cb934fbc3def3e1.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/3b4ab204bc4e81748cf5fbf76d4dc62123364df8e8ed0425eb451969e84c1aa2.jpg

  • IanE

    ‘Thinness’ I understand, but what often puzzles me is the use of the ‘ultra-thin’ term – not too inappropriate here, though I have a JLC Master Ultra-Thin Moon which, at just under 10 mm in thickness, rather tests the use of the term [I love the watch anyway]!

  • Marius

    According to this article: “…but it too carries a few weird, though not at all uncommon properties such as a stratospheric price, a relatively stratospheric limited edition number at 75 made, and some strange, although I’m sure well-considered “oversights” in finishing.”

    In my view, the fact that JLC produces only 75 units is great news because this is what a true limited edition, exclusive watch should look like. Of course, it’s true that over the last years the modus operandi of many brands has been to produce their so-called “limited edition” watches in 2000 – 3000 units. However, a real limited edition, exclusive, and highly-expensive watch should be produced in under 100 units.

    Speaking of price, whilst $400,000 is an impressive sum, it’s pretty much in line with the current market prices. One has to keep in mind that this is a completely bespoke project. Practically speaking, JLC had to develop a new movement; a new case; a new dial, and even a new strap for this timepiece. All these, coupled with the highly limited edition somewhat explain the high price. What’s more, keep in mind that, for instance, a Grönefeld GTM-06 Tourbillon Minute Repeater costs over €400,000 (and that’s not an ultra thin/ flying tourbillon, by the way). Not to mention that the Grönefeld looks more like an Invicta/Michael Kors.

    As for the finish & decoration, I agree that the wheels could have been better finished. However, the reality is that JLC (just like FP Journe) has never really had a hardcore focus on finish & decoration. Rather, these two brands have always devoted their attention to the technical side. For instance, the superb FP Journe Sonnerie Souverain is one of the most impressive watches I have seen thanks to its technical features, and not necessarily due to its finish, which, just as in the case of the JLC, is very good but not stellar.

    According to this article: “…we’ve been spoiled by indies when it comes to next level movement decorations. I blame Grönefeld, Hajime Asaoka, and Bexei for that…”

    When speaking about independent watchmakers, it’s important to point out three aspect.

    1. Very few independents produce a minute repeater, let alone an in-house developed and manufactured ultra thin flying tourbillon minute repeater. Grönefeld produces the GTM-06; Voutilainen produces the MR-10 (which uses an outsourced ebauché, and doesn’t feature a tourbillon); FP Journe has the wonderful Sonnerie Souverain (in-house produced, but doesn’t feature a tourbillon); and of course Greubel & Forsey (although the Richemont Group owns 51%, so I’m not sure how independent G&F really is). Apart from these watchmakers, no other (or extremely few) independent produces a minute repeater (and certainly not Bexei or Osaka).

    2. Just as in the case of very small bespoke tailors and shoemakers, independent watchmakers are not always able to offer a consistent and constant level of quality throughout all their products. As Gary G from Quill & Pad recently explained, some watches produced by the young watchmaker Rexhepi have a sublime finish, while others have a slightly lower level. Very small operations can’t always deliver the same consistency as, say Patek, Lange, or JLC.

    3. Another aspect linked with independents is their limited focus on the quality control department. Being rather small, it’s obvious that these brands can’t invest large sums in the QC side of business. If you’re buying a highly-complicated watch (minute repeater, perpetual calendar/chronograph, etc.) from the likes of Patek, JLC, or Lange, you can be quite certain that these watches have been thoroughly tested, and they will perform very well (most of them, at least). By comparison, independents are not exactly known for focusing on durability & realibility, so I’m not certain how their minute repeaters (or similar) will perform over time. As an example, when Roger Dubuis was acquired by Richemont, the first aspect that this group took care of was the QC department of this brand as Roger Dubuis watches were notoriously unreliable.

    • David Bredan

      These pieces of generic opinion would perhaps stand on their (wobbly) feet if this wasn’t a $400,000 watch. 75 pieces in such a run is everything, but exclusive – ask anyone who can actually consider dropping that sort of sum on one of these.

      Nobody cares that JLC had to develop a movement in a halo piece. Developing a new movement costs between CHF1-2mn per year – if this took five years, which I doubt it did, that could still be recovered with 20 pieces, not 75. The “the reality [lol @ “the reality”] is that JLC (just like FP Journe) has never really had a hardcore focus on finish & decoration” is a weak argument at $400,000. Then just outsource decoration processes to a 3rd party – I know freelance people who all that they do is freelance anglage work (just an example), and it isn’t as though small ateliers were absolutely overworked these days not to be able to take on a few wheels etc.

      “Very small operations can’t always deliver the same consistency as, say Patek, Lange, or JLC.” is another weak arguement when JLC’s self-imposed level of quality isn’t very high, therefore easier to maintain.

      • Marius

        Exactly, all my arguments are weak because you say so. Your word is the Law. As we all know, you are the undisputed and undefeated authority of all things related to horology. You are the true Pontifff of Horology.

        Some say that Jack Forster, Walt Odets, and Carlos Perez are in reality pseudonyms of a mysterious guy living in Budapest. Others say that the CEOs of Patek Philippe and Rolex never move a finger before consulting the same mysterious guy from Budapest. All we know is he’s called … the Stig`s Hungarian Cousin?

        • David Bredan

          I really don’t need any further confirmation than you resorting to getting personal. For the record, I am the Stig’s Hungarian cousin — and part-time pontiff(f).

          • Sheez Gagoo

            It would be nicer with a second hand on the tourbi and some indices. For that price I don’t only expect better wheels but some chatons. Not easy in such a flat watch but I think they could have managed to do so. Does the rotor turn 360°?

          • Marius

            Exactly, you are the master of making a case for your arguments. Here is just one example:

            In the article, you argue that this JLC is produced in a highly limited quantity of only 75 units — “…a relatively stratospheric limited edition number at 75 made.”

            Then, one hour later, you argue in the comment that the 75-unit production is anything but exclusive, and that any rich punter could confirm that 75 units is simply not exclusive enough — “75 pieces in such a run is everything, but exclusive – ask anyone who can actually consider dropping that sort of sum on one of these.”

            Great work Descartes! Your logic is flawless. Now don’t forget about tomorrow’s Sunday article “How To Save The Watch Industry, And The Tanzanian High-Speed Train, And Since We’re At It, The World.”

          • David Bredan

            In all seriousness, without a petty personal tone you seem to indulge in so often, are you seriously having reading difficulties or just are so desperate to not see the same point made twice? I said the same thing, twice!!! “A stratospheric limited number” = “anything but exclusive.”

          • Berndt Norten

            https://youtu.be/jN2AdOjI4FI

            Call up, ring once, hang up the phone
            To let me know you made it home
            Don’t want nothing to be wrong with part-time JLC lover
            If she’s with me I’ll blink the lights
            To let you know tonight’s the night
            For Marius and Davey B my part-time lovers
            We are undercover passion on the run
            Chasing love up against the sun

          • Berndt Norten

            AC 3 called
            He’s on the run
            Hightailed out of Bangers
            In the sun

            From now on
            To you and me
            He’ll be
            The Part Time Pontiff

    • To be fair, the Grönefeld GTM-06 was introduced 9 years ago and is no longer representative of their current design ethos (and yes it does have an Invictica look to it). And most Grönefeld pieces cost a lot less than $400K and have quite impressive finishing.

      Limited Edition numbers are a relative thing. One should compare them against the total number of watches a brand produced annually or even against the production numbers for a non-limited version (if one exists) of the same watch. Cheers.

    • John Taylor

      I see Marius usually writes up a well thought out post and the only writer who finds fault is David Brendan. Well sometimes Ariel too. Why do these so called writers attack the readers? It seems trivial for a writer to allow his emotions to get the best of him. Sad.

      • David Bredan

        Yes, it’s a shame that I’m a human being too. It really is tragic that after a while I begin to indicate that it gets old how invalid arguments are shared not in a good willing fashion but systematically just to desperately try make the original content look bad and to provoke a response.

        And yes, I do have a decreasing amount of patience to explain factually wrong/false claims fabricated to make my work look bad. I wrote what I wrote not because I had nothing better to do or because I pulled these things out of my ass but because I have dedicated several years and immense amounts of time and energy to come to the conclusions that I share above. Am I always right? Hell no, but there’s a difference between standing corrected and responses systematically fabricated with no good intention other than to provoke a response.

        How sad indeed.

        • Berndt Norten

          It’s ok, David. As a wise man once said…

          https://youtu.be/YhxjNYvJbgM

          • David Bredan

            That isn’t bad, but I only read Descartes at this time of day.

          • Berndt Norten

            What is it there 23:30? Have a drink on me. (Don’t worry about the check—we’ll get hell to pay)

          • Mr. Snrub

            What a bummer. Might want to balance that out with some Kant or you’ll end up looking like Death Of Marat.

        • John Taylor

          I see where you are coming from but maybe you need thicker skin. Either ignore those type of comments or kill them with kindness. By escalating the discussion it only makes ABTW look unprofessional. I realize you don’t care but you do need to see how it is being perceived by readers.

          • David Bredan

            Thanks for toning it down.

      • Playboy Johnny

        Those two do seem to enjoy diving in head first, and arguing with the people that keep this site in business.

        • David Bredan

          Nope, they don’t keep us in business. Fair criticism does, what I described below does not and neither do false accusations and “quotes” (not in this thread) knowingly removed from context just to make us look bad. These don’t keep us in business. They don’t make a difference in that regard (thank God), but the ill-willing intentions do bother me. Which is what they are thought out to do, so that they provoke a response.

          • John Taylor

            Then don’t respond. Easy.

          • Berndt Norten
          • David Bredan

            Then the false claims fabricated (now generation 2.0 with quotes!) to undermine what was put together through years of dedication and energy will appear to be true to some. I can’t let that happen (unless they actually are correct). People like @Marius know this, which — in their desperation for attention or whatever else their motive may be — they use to provoke a response.

          • Playboy Johnny

            Dave, you really need a vacation. Unplug for awhile.
            You are rambling.

          • Berndt Norten
          • David Bredan

            Yes I do. That being admitted, I’d appreciate a bit of mutual effort by understanding the point I’m making 🙂

          • Berndt Norten
          • Berndt Norten

            You can only stroll down Vaci St so many times.

            And a million vacations is what you’ve got in mind!

          • Marius

            The Fat Basterd wants to steal My Precious, and I can’t let that happen (unless he’s actually correct). Then, people like Mr. T, Donald Duck, and J. Edgar Hoover will try to take over the world, and, in their desperation for attention, or whatever else their motive might be, will try to provoke a response.

          • Playboy Johnny

            Laughing out loud!!!

          • Mr. Snrub

            My advice is to tread lightly. You have a thriving community here but the minute you crack down it will die. I’ve seen it happen many times. Watch previews/reviews are available dozens of sites. Unique IP hits are what keep you in business. There is no room for hubris.

  • SuperStrapper

    The clef on the dial and notes on the music add a cartoonish aspect that I think easily could have been omitted. Peripheral rotors are very cool and I wish there were more. Having one in a watch like this puts the piece in a class of it’s own. The thinness aspect I don’t care that much about but this assortment of features and complications give their own status that few could hope to challenge. And as Marius very rightly pointed out this is how an LE should be handled: in actually limited numbers. When a watch already in a brand’s catalogue is produced with a different dial colour in a run of 2500 units and considered ‘limited’ it’s a bit cringey. I’d sooner refer to that as ‘reduced production’ rather than limited.
    I also would have liked to see them do something a little more special with the rotor that becomes visible on the dial side. Nothing overly polarising but upping the decoration game for that element could have gone a long way on this dial that while very nice almost seems to be begging for additional feature.
    A shot showing the repeater ‘spent’ may have been worthwhile to show the watch’s appearance without the pusher sticking out and ready to be activated.

  • benjameshodges

    Hugely impressive stuff. Although I can now predict that Bvlgari will splice their tourbillon and minute repeater Octo Finnisimo’s for yet another work record-breaking thin watch for Baselworld 2019.

  • egznyc

    This could have been great. Some impressive technology on display here but the dial cut outs just look cheap to me, and the rotor is barely “finished.” The movement side is the one I’d want to display; too bad that side doesn’t tell the time.

  • BNABOD

    So sad they had to put the Clef at 8. A lovely watch ruined by an unnecessary gimmick.
    Aside from this I think it is awesome

  • Stuart MacKenzie
    • joe Shmoe

      RIP wat grandma.

  • Playboy Johnny

    Put a “Rubber B” strap on it….Maybe I’ll think about it then.

  • Raymond Wilkie

    If i had 400k to splash on a timepiece, it wouldn’t be this one. Nice as it is, spending this much on one piece is just stupid.

    • Yeah – you could get a couple of entry level Richard Mille watches for your $400K. No wait… that’s a bad idea…

  • Nello Alexandri

    As usual, Bredan picks on JLC.
    “Oversights” in finishing… Stratospheric limited edition number” of 75.
    Hilarious.

    • To be fair, for $400K, I’d expect near perfection too.

    • David Bredan

      I’ve said this before, I guess I’ll have to again: argue with what is being said, not who’s saying it.

      • Nello Alexandri

        “…Arbitraty coming together of bridges and cocks…”
        Does not matter who wrote it, still hilarious. I would like to see a less arbitrary arrangement with these specs. Who makes a watch this thin with these specs, at any price?
        List here please:

        • David Bredan

          “adjective
          1.
          based on random choice or personal whim, rather than any reason or system.”
          How is this necessarily a bad thing? The layout and especially the cutouts and shapes look arbitrary without any easily identifiable system or explanation provided by JLC. That doesn’t mean it’s bad, nor that it’s good — it’s a neutral thing. Try again.

          • Nello Alexandri

            I would disagree. I think most engineers and watchmakers would as well. Random choice and personal whim play no roles in a design this complex.
            I am sure you are correct though.

  • Horum Positivium

    The button at 10 o’clock is awful. The slits in the dial – awful. The price – funny. Who signed this one off?

  • BrJean

    When JLC was good.

  • Jari Norvanto

    Not a very beautiful, but certainly cool watch. The dial windows reveals the rotor, which is hidden to the eye from the backside; which is cool, since it allows more exhibition of the clockwork. The repeater is not really a meaningful complication in a wrist watch, neither is the tourbillon. But tourbillons are always amazing to look at; in particular when they are flying ones. The combo of complications in an ultra-thin watch is remarkable.

  • midnucas

    I don’t understand the point of the slide-and-button system for engaging the repeater. And I literally mean that I don’t understand. The review talks about it as a “twist,” “feature” and “complication,” when it’s far from clear to me whether it really is so.

    The slide in a conventional minute repeater doesn’t just activate the complication, it also powers it—the energy from engaging the slide gets put into a spring that powers the complication. Separating the powering and the release into a separate slide and button doesn’t sound like it’d be radically different in design, and it just seems more annoying to have to perform two actions to activate the repeater. I wonder if somehow the design is imposed by some technical limitation that derives from the thinness of the watch.

  • egznyc

    Okay, after this many comments I would’ve expected somebody to have referred to this as the HUBRIS Mechanica. For $400K, after all …

  • Richard Baptist

    An impressive piece of engineering, I love the complications, but the look of it makes me feel flat. It seems like a cold watch, staid watch. I agree with David on the finishing. Again I think the price is ridiculous, couldn’t I get something from Greubel and Forsey for 400k?

    • ProJ

      You can get something but probably not a tourbillion and a minute repeater, and certainly not as thin. The grand sonnerie in particular is 3 times more expensive.

      • Richard Baptist

        A guy could dream – if I had 400k to blow on a watch, this would be a good problem to have.

    • Bladeknight

      Of couse you can buy a GF watch with less than 400k. But this JLC watch has tourbillon + minute repeater + thin + nice size (41mm) + auto winding. If you think GF’s watches are more adorable, thinks about this: all GF watches below 400k gives you only time and tourbillon, or none function, come up with a big case and thick as hell.

      The GF entry-level Signature 1 – time only, 43,5mm/13,94mm – costs about 150k for the steel examples. And you think that price is not ridiculous?

  • Raymond Wilkie

    I really think this is hubris mechanica gone mental.

  • ProJ

    An impressive piece of haute horologie no doubt specially given the case thickness, or lack thereof. But… the decision to have a rotor to be seen through cut windows at the dial side is controversial to say the least. I don’t think whoever willing to pay 400k would mind having that rotor hidden.