Apple Watch Hands-On: The Wristwatch Just Caught Up To The 21st Century

Apple Watch Hands-On: The Wristwatch Just Caught Up To The 21st Century

Apple Watch Hands-On: The Wristwatch Just Caught Up To The 21st Century Hands-On

After some hands-on time with the Apple Watch, I've learned a few things. Perhaps the most important of which is that the majority of discussions regarding the Apple Watch by the traditional watch media have been rather misguided. I feel that people need to understand that the Apple Watch is not only a new type of product for Apple, but the first real "cross-over watch" that wades in both the waters of technology and horology. For a moment, I'd like people to put aside their criticisms and complaints, and consider what I believe to be a future inevitability: the dominance of the smartwatch as a necessary tool in the everyday lives of everyday people.

Apple as a company doesn't like the term "smartwatch" and will not refer to the Apple Watch as such. They didn't call the iPhone a smartphone, and as far as they are concerned, it is a "watch" produced by Apple – hence the name. What implication might this have for Apple? First of all, Apple is in a complicated position as a lifestyle company as well as a tech company. Apple stopped producing gadgets and advanced computers for merely tech literate geeks for a while now. As of a few years ago, Apple has (perhaps inadvertently) focused more on high-tech, albeit mainstream items for general consumption. In effect, the wide proliferation of their products in tech-savvy circles - as well as more mainstream consumer demographics - has allowed Apple to transcend its original mandate as a computer maker. If you recall, several years ago, Apple officially changed its company name from "Apple Computers" to just "Apple."

I mention this important segue to suggest that the Apple Watch isn't just another gadget that Silicon Valley hopes might be its next cash cow. I instead think that the Apple Watch (which we debuted here with a lot more detail) is part of a larger evolution of how we integrate technology into our lives. The genesis of the Apple Watch is still something that Apple will not discuss at length. Apple is famously sly with their responses to product questions, but I gleaned enough information to determine why the Apple Watch has been in the works for years, just as many reports have suggested. At a time when naysayers all over the internet described the Apple Watch (then "iWatch") as a fiction, I wrote about how such a device was an inevitability, back in January of 2013. Nevertheless, I was proven somewhat wrong about when Apple would release a smartwatch product, as I privately guessed a September 2014 launch was too soon. It turns out that Apple was ready with a product sooner than expected, but still, I was partially correct in that the Apple Watch was still not ready for prime time.

Apple has made it clear that the Apple Watch will ship in "early 2015." The reason that they aren't specific with when, is simple: they aren't done with it yet. The hardware elements of the Apple Watch seem to be complete, but Apple appears to still be tweaking the software for optimal performance. I also believe that Apple has yet to decide final prices for the various versions of their watch.

Apple Watch Hands-On: The Wristwatch Just Caught Up To The 21st Century Hands-On
The 42mm Apple Watch In Steel On Steel Bracelet, With A Display For The Local Time As Well As Four Time Zones

How Much Will The Apple Watch Cost & Where Will It Be Available?

The price of the Apple Watch and where people can buy it is a topic of rich discussion. Apple hasn't announced the full price list because, it's my guess, they haven't settled on final prices yet. Apple has indicated that the Apple Watch will start at a price of $350, but that is for the most basic Apple Watch Sport models that come in aluminum cases, without all the "premium materials" available for the Apple Watch in steel or the Apple Watch Edition in gold. Apple pointed out to me that the Apple Watch will be initially available in six different finishes – which is a mixture of both case materials and colors. These finishes include two colors of aluminum, two colors of steel (polished and PVD black), and two forms of gold (18k yellow gold and 18k rose gold). That, of course, doesn't include the many strap and bracelet options.

There has been a lot of speculation about the prices of the steel Apple Watches as well as the gold models. In regard to the latter (Apple Watch Edition pieces), I would like to confirm that they are in fact produced from solid 18k gold and use a unique manufacturing technique selected by Apple that improves the hardness of gold. According to Apple, the extra hardness is thanks to a special gold alloy, but they didn't go into more detail.

At $350, the Apple Watch Sport has an aluminum case, non-sapphire crystal, no ceramic parts, and a simple colorful strap that feels like something which is a mix of silicon and rubber. The strap is pretty great, actually, in regard to softness and wearing comfort. This is for the absolute base model. The Apple Watch in steel has a more durable case, sapphire crystal, as well as ceramic elements. I have hypothesized that it will be priced at around $500, but other sources have estimated that the steel Apple Watch will be priced as high as $1,000 – a price that would not surprise me. The Apple Watch Edition in 18k gold is another topic of hot debate. I have previously estimated that it may be priced at between $5,000 - $10,000. Others have estimated prices from about $1,500 - $10,000. That is a pretty big gap in estimated pricing for the Apple Watch Edition. On one hand, the watches do use 18k gold (which is expensive), but on the other hand, we aren't sure exactly how much gold is in the case and what type of deal Apple has - as they are a company famous for securing good pricing on components and materials. At this point, I would be surprised if the Apple Watch Edition was priced at over $5,000, but also surprised if it was priced at under $1,500 or $2,000.

What is more interesting is where Apple Watches will be sold. All of a sudden, Apple has created a product that might not be ideal for sale only at the Best Buy stores of the world, but rather, high-end boutiques and department stores. Apple didn't confirm anything, but they did offer an enthusiastic hint of "that is an interesting idea" when I brought up the topic of selling the Apple Watch in non-traditional outlets such as jewelers, watch stores, and department stores. Literally nothing is out of the question at this point in regard to where people might be able to purchase an Apple Watch, outside of buying directly from Apple.

Apple Watch Hands-On: The Wristwatch Just Caught Up To The 21st Century Hands-On
Apps Will Be Navigated On The Apple Watch Through The Touch Screen And The "Digital Crown" On The Side Of The Case

Is The Apple Watch Really A Watch?

Yes, of course the Apple Watch is a "watch." Many people, especially in the watch community, have defended their love of traditional mechanical watches by segmenting the Apple Watch in a category of high-end gadgets versus "watches." While I understand and perhaps even empathize with this sentiment, I disagree. If anything, the Apple Watch is what the wrist watch is meant to be in the 21st century. You might not like that, but it is the truth, when it comes to wearable wrist technology. Traditional watch lovers know (and even relish the fact) that their timepieces employ antiquated technology. Such technology might be produced using the most modern construction equipment and with innovative materials, but at the end of the day, no one can argue that a mechanical wrist watch would be able to compete with the sheer utility of a computer.

Having said that, wrist space is an incredibly useful place to put technology. It is easily accessible, easy to see, easy to wear, and most importantly, it is wholly convenient. As humans we have populated our wrists with devices to tell the time starting about 100 years ago, and today in 2014, we should be using the same space in order to offer a range of new information – that includes the time. The Apple Watch isn't a death blow to the original watch; in fact, it is the most watch-inspired consumer wrist gadget of all time - even more so than round-cased smartwatches, such as the Moto 360, which runs Android Wear.

Those familiar with the world of high-end timepieces will notice an endless series of "watch-related" design cues, noises, materials, finishes, and features that Apple adopted from the traditional world of watches. Some things they improved upon, and some things were merely used in the overall performance of the Apple Watch. A good example of the latter is the alert noise. Apple could have chosen an endless array of sounds to use when the Apple Watch needs to alert its wearer of something. Instead, they used a chiming sound that is clearly inspired by the mechanical chimes present in complicated watches with musical minute repeater or sonnerie complications.

Forgive me for not going into every single detail of how Apple was inspired by the world of traditional watches for the Apple Watch – there are frankly too many to list. I do have confirmation that Apple dedicated a great deal of time to studying and surveying the watch industry, as well as engaging in copious amounts of research on websites dedicated to watches, including aBlogtoWatch. In an inadvertent way, a lot of our work likely helped influence how the current Apple Watch was designed, and where Apple will take the Apple Watch in the future.

Apple Watch Hands-On: The Wristwatch Just Caught Up To The 21st Century Hands-On

Perhaps the most important element which indicates that the Apple Watch is truly a "watch" is how it fits and is used on the wrist. The experience of wearing the Apple Watch is as good or better than most high-end timepieces, and operating the Apple Watch is very similar to how people might use their traditional timepieces. This is especially true when you compare it to early smarwatches that focused on button-based menus.

In fact, when considering the "watchness" of the Apple Watch, people actually take for granted the concept that Apple focused so heavily on offering about a dozen watch faces right off the bat. In my opinion, if they wanted to take focus away from the "watch element," they wouldn't have offered to many analog ways to tell the time that are so clearly influenced by traditional watches.

Having said that, the future of the connected wrist watch is about so much more than reading the time. Apple and its competitors are clearly dedicating huge amounts of resources into trying to discover what other features will best resonate with consumers. Still, the Apple Watch is very much about simply being able to glance at it and read the time – in a way that is both convenient and useful - just like a "real watch." In that regard, the Apple Watch doesn't try to reinvent the concept of a "wrist wearable" but begins with the concept of a traditional watch and develops it from there by adding functionality and connectivity. At its heart, I truly feel that the Apple Watch began life as just that... a watch. I don't necessarily feel that way for many of the currently available competitive products.

Of course, the Apple Watch cannot replicate the total wrist watch wearing experience. At least not yet. Given the limitations of current battery life, the screen must be turned off most of the time, which is a huge drawback from a design perspective. There is no way around that, but when the screen is activated (often automatically as you raise it to read), it is very attractive and pleasant to read. This not only includes a wide viewing angle, but also a crisp level of detail with bright colors and a screen that should be quite legible even in direct sunlight.

Apple Watch Hands-On: The Wristwatch Just Caught Up To The 21st Century Hands-On

How Do You Interact With The Apple Watch?

Apple has not yet released a final version of the Apple Watch software, so there isn't a final user interface experience for people outside of Apple to test. However, we more-or-less know exactly what the user interface of the Apple Watch is going to be like, and after experiencing it first-hand, I can assure you it is pretty good. Apple was really (and I mean really) concerned that the screen size of something on your wrist would be far too small to properly interact with. The irony of the Apple Watch release date was that in addition to Apple releasing perhaps its smallest screened item yet, it also released its largest iPhone screen with the iPhone 6 Plus. As you probably know by now, the Apple Watch combines both a touchscreen and a crown, along with an additional pusher on the case. The touchscreen is not multi-touch, but it does have a cool system that is able to differentiate between a short tap and a long press. This is really important in how you select and adjust various functions.

While your finger is used to move around the screen and swipe, the crown is a key element in how you interact with the Apple Watch. In addition to the crown being used as a button (pusher) it is also a scroll wheel. The crown is thus used to zoom (which has a new meaning in the Apple Watch OS), but is also used to scroll through documents such as e-mails and messages. In the future, when I further test the Apple Watch, I'll be in a better position to comment on the ease of using the interface. I can, however, say that it is among the best (if not the outright best) interfaces I have seen from any smartwatch device today... or even small device overall that is on the market.

Apple Watch Hands-On: The Wristwatch Just Caught Up To The 21st Century Hands-On

Can you type into the Apple Watch or is there a keyboard? That is a good question, and the answer is no. The Apple Watch employs Apple's Siri function, which is a powerful voice recognition system that allows you to operate many of the Apple Watch's features just by talking to it – we have also seen voice activation incorporated into Android Wear, Google's operating system that is tailored specifically for wearable devices. The Apple Watch also has a speaker built into it (in addition to the microphone). So speaking naturally to your wrist is going to be a lot more common in the coming years. This means that you can have a phone call with your Apple Watch, if you choose, and you can also listen to messages or watch videos on it.

What happens if you get a text message on the Apple Watch? Apple has developed not only a list of canned responses such as "OK" or "I understand," but it learns from the user and will suggest common responses that you use, with the people that you use those responses with. What the Apple Watch does more so than any other Apple product before is attempt to learn from the user, and strive to customize the experience for them – although its should be noted that this new learning feature is in line with what the new iOS 8 keyboard offers, which has been available in Android for a while. This "learning" not only applies to the responses you make to people in messages, but also in regard to who you call and your activities. While many of these features could have technically been available on an iPhone, for whatever reason, Apple has chosen to integrated them into the Apple Watch.

Apple Watch Hands-On: The Wristwatch Just Caught Up To The 21st Century Hands-On

The Apple Watch Is Meant To Live With The iPhone, But It Can Be Independent As Well

While an iPhone can live without an Apple Watch, all Apple Watches must have a host iPhone. None of this is because Apple is trying to make extra money by selling people two products: it is because the technology does not yet exist to allow for smartwatches to seriously live on their own and offer all the functionality of a phone and then some (yes, there are "stand alone" smartwatches, but in my experiences, none of them are particularly good or highly recommended by critics). However, that doesn't mean that the Apple Watch cannot be away from your phone for periods of time.

A good example is during exercise. Apple indicated to me that you don't need to take your phone around with you while you exercise, unless you require GPS functions. The Apple Watch can store some media, such as songs, independently on the device (the internal storage of the Apple Watch has yet to be announced), and it can track a lot of exercise and movement data without being connected to an iPhone. Once paired again, the Apple Watch shares data with the host apps on the phone. This answers a lot of questions people had about whether or not the Apple Watch would be able to live apart from its host iPhone device.

Apple actually made clever use of the Apple Watch's relationship with the iPhone. Apple Watch users will install an Apple Watch app on their iPhone, which will be used to download apps onto the watch as well as likely manage Apple Watch settings. A user's iPhone is also used to help with computational demands. Apple cleverly pushes a lot of processor needs to the phone in order to preserve Apple Watch battery life. Thus, the Apple Watch is snappier, with longer battery life because a lot of tasks can be off-loaded to the host phone. Having said that, aside from installing apps, most things can be done from the watch itself (such as adjust settings, customize the interface, select watch dials, switch apps, etc...).

Apple Watch Hands-On: The Wristwatch Just Caught Up To The 21st Century Hands-On

Will The Apple Watch Change The Way You Exercise?

If anything, Apple is a latecomer to the fitness wearable craze, even though many fitness devices already interact with the iPhone. Apple made a big deal about the health and activity apps, as well as the sensors in the Apple Watch, and I think they are on the right track to something that will fundamentally shift the way a lot of people exercise. In other words, while Apple didn't invent the activity tracker, they can help make it more mainstream given their sway with mainstream consumers.

Using a series of sensors, such as an accelerometer (to measure movement), a pulsometer, and more, the Apple Watch will track your daily activities and offer suggestions that are designed to get users more "active." Apple is in no position to make lofty claims about how the Apple Watch might help people lose weight or be more healthy, but they have a vested interest in attempting to do so. Not only is the fitness tracking function an important way to explain to consumers why getting an Apple Watch is a useful purchase in addition to their iPhone, but it will help Apple continue to research how people use, and ultimately benefit from activity and fitness tracking tools and software. It has yet to be seen how many people purchase the Apple Watch primarily for its fitness functions, or if they purchase it for other reasons and end up using the fitness functions regularly.

The goal for Apple and its competitors in regard to fitness tech products is likely to develop a means of data acquisition and utilization which turn people's daily lives into a simple math game of "expend X effort to yield Y rewards." While years off, it is easy to imagine a future eventuality when devices track the calories we consume and the calories we expend, in order to make weight loss and staying healthy a matter of numbers versus instinct and feelings. The 1950s experienced the era of "better living through science," a then novel concept that has since evolved into today's Silicon Valley promoted mantra of "better living through data" (and the interpretation thereof).

Apple Watch Hands-On: The Wristwatch Just Caught Up To The 21st Century Hands-On

Just don't take the Apple Watch swimming yet. In the future, the Apple Watch will become more durable - though we haven't seen any real-world experiences to determine how it holds up to abuse. While Apple hasn't released specific details yet, they explain that the first generation Apple Watch is "splash resistant." That more-or-less translates into 30 meters of water resistance measured by traditional watch standards. The translation is that the Apple Watch can put up with a reasonable amount of sweat and dirt, but don't expect to snorkel or shower with it. Furthermore, I think it is safe to suggest that you shouldn't take it where you think it might be subject to extreme shock or damage. I have a feeling that some of the biggest future improvements in the Apple Watch will be durability and being able to wear it during even more activities.

Once again, I will have to wait until early 2015 to test the specific fitness applications of the Apple Watch, but I think it has a lot of potential. Again, even if Apple didn't invent a lot of the activity tracking functionality offered in the Apple Watch, it has streamlined many components and offered them in a package a lot more people will end up using compared to most currently available fitness tracking devices.

Apple Watch Hands-On: The Wristwatch Just Caught Up To The 21st Century Hands-On

How Will The Apple Watch Change The Way You Communicate?

Perhaps the most widely publicized communication feature of the Apple Watch is its ability to transmit one's heart beat to the Apple Watch device of another person. Essentially, the Apple Watch has taken the concept of the text message and really run with it – in what arguably is a nerdy and perhaps somewhat "romantic" manner. Oddly enough, many of the cool new communication features employed in the Apple Watch could have easily been part of the iPhone (as I mentioned above). This includes being able to draw little sketches, sharing animated emoticons (emojis), and of course, sending haptic feedback.

Having said that, the iPhone lacks the "Taptic Engine" of the Apple Watch. It is an evolution of the vibration feature found in many devices, which causes the rear of the Apple Watch case to literally tap you. It is gentle, although clearly noticeable, especially when compared to a vibration. I suspect that the "Taptic" feedback will also help prevent "phantom alerts," which can happen when people physiologically mistake a small feeling or sound for an alert. Many people experience this with phantom rings, when they mistakenly believe that they heard their phone ring. The Taptic (haptic) feedback system in the Apple Watch does a lot of things, but most importantly, it makes you aware of incoming notifications... as well  as to indicate the heartbeat of someone sending you a message. Will this be part of next gen "sexting?"

No doubt, the first time anyone receives a "heart beat message" from a loved one, the experience is sure to be strange. Imagine, for instance, the first time you did a video call across the world. The feeling might be a bit like that, only more intimate. Apple hasn't said this, but the idea of the Apple Watch as a notification tool is to make alerts more personable, and less about some gadget buzzing on your wrist. This required a lot of engineering, and while some people might consider it overkill, I think Apple did a very good job of revolutionizing the concept of a foreign object on your wrist that is suddenly going to bother you about all types of things throughout the day. Again, it is something I have yet to experience outside of a simple demonstration, but what I have seen (and felt) is far superior to what is offered by currently available competitive smartwatch devices.

Use of sketch messages and new types of emoji are interesting, and in many ways are a result of the fact that Apple did not design the Apple Watch with a keyboard. While you can easily pull out your iPhone to send text messages or e-mails, the concept behind the native messaging system built into the Apple Watch is to communicate with emotions versus mere words. I have a feeling that I would personally also create a custom response that says "I just got your message on my watch. I will respond soon when I get to my phone." It will be very interesting to see how children and young adults react and utilize the new forms of communication offered by the Apple Watch, as well as where Apple and its competitors will take this concept in the near future.

Apple Watch Hands-On: The Wristwatch Just Caught Up To The 21st Century Hands-On

Will The Apple Watch Replace My Wallet?

Features such as Apple Pay and the existing Passbook app are major pushes to a future of when the traditional wallet will become an odd vestige of the past. When Apple announced the iPhone 6 and the Apple Watch, they also announced Apple Pay – a service that many in the tech industry heralded as being among their biggest announcements. What is Apple Pay? Essentially it is a service that allows you to link your credit or debit card with your phone or Apple Watch, allowing for close-contact payments. This means that people will be able to use their Apple Watch to pay for items using their existing credit cards. NFC (near field communication) technology has existed for a few years and it allows people to detach from their plastic cards and pay via phones. Other manufacturers have also used this technology to connect with NFC compatible devices, including wireless speakers, televisions, and more. When it comes to processing payments, however, the technology's integration by Apple into their watch is a huge push for the segment, given Apple's influence on mainstream users.

I bring up the importance of Apple Pay not just to illustrate one of the many things people will be able to do with an Apple Watch, but more to highlight some of the potentially valuable reasons why people might consider items like an Apple Watch more than a sheer luxury, but rather a necessity. A legitimate debate exists over whether the Apple Watch is merely a fun second screen for one's phone, or a new extension of mobile technology that will soon be as indispensable as having a phone. I don't know the answer, but I do know that if smartwatches are able to negate the need to carry around a physical wallet, then consumers will have a huge incentive to use them.

Of course, there are still two major issues with the Apple Watch replacing your wallet. First, is the fact that if the battery runs out on your Apple Watch or iPhone, then you effectively have nothing. Second, is your ID. As far as I know, there is no digital equivalent or copy of an official identification card such as a driver's license or passport. Once such unique identifiers become safely digital, then it might be possible to kiss your traditional wallet goodbye. I know I'd like that because my wallet averages about two inches thick - and I hate carrying it around... as much as I seem to like filling it up with pieces of paper and plastic.

Apple Watch Hands-On: The Wristwatch Just Caught Up To The 21st Century Hands-On

How Does The Quality Of The Apple Watch Compare With Traditional Luxury Watches?

I've seen some terrible $400 watches and some rather amazing ones. Watch lovers know that you can't always equate a specific price to a specific expected level of quality. Part of that has to do with economies of scale, meaning that lower production watches often have to charge more for less. This is something Apple does not need to worry about. In fact, given Apple's likely huge production of Apple Watches, consumers should be able to acquire amazingly feature-rich watches for prices highly uncommon in the watch industry. So with that said, I think it is important to state here and now, that for the money, the Apple Watch is going to be a force to be reckoned with.

In the world of mechanical Swiss watches, very little worth wearing for the serious enthusiast can be purchased for under $1,000. Some people might even suggest $5,000 or even $8,000 (or more) as the sweet spot for a good entry-level Swiss watch. With a starting price of $350, the Apple Watch Sport pretty much blows away everything else in the watch world at this price level – a sentiment that has been already mentioned by my colleagues.

Going up the price ladder, the Apple Watch is still a viable competitor to existing traditional watches. What Apple did that was interesting, was to not only take inspiration from the traditional watch industry, but to improve upon some things. A good example is how they measure their watches. The 42mm Apple Watch (there is also a 38mm version) is measured from top to bottom (height as a function of lug-to-lug distance). In the watch industry, the basic measurement of a case is width, not height. Apple knows this, but ultimately decided to designate the "size" of their watches by height, but not width. Why?

Apple confirmed that there was an internal debate about this. Some people wanted to go with the traditional way of describing a watch's size, while others said that what was more important to assess a good fit was the height of a watch – such that the edges of the case do not extend past the boundaries of one's wrist. This is absolutely correct, and something I have been preaching for years. Apple decided that height was a better measurement, and thus decided to use that as a designation, arguably clarifying one of the more ambiguous areas of trying to size a watch without actually wearing it.

Apple Watch Hands-On: The Wristwatch Just Caught Up To The 21st Century Hands-On

Another great watch improvement by Apple is in their steel metal bracelet. Not only can the bracelet be sized (by removing links) without a tool, but the butterfly-style deployant clasp (even when closed) is totally flush with the bracelet and doesn't add any thickness. It feels rather natural on the wrist, especially when compared to many other metal bracelets. This is in addition to the clever quick release system allowing a bracelet or strap to be very easily removed from any Apple Watch case. For something even remotely comparable in a high-end Swiss watch, you'd need to spend at least several thousand dollars.

Apple doesn't have the best track record of producing durable products - as evidenced by anyone you know who had excessive wear on the sides of their iPhone or a cracked screen. These issues indicate that not even working with more high-quality and expensive materials, like aluminum, is a guarantee for greater durability. So where does that leave the Apple Watch? I don't really know, to be honest, but I am told they have been designed to put up with one's daily life. I assume that means they can be at least dropped from time-to-time.

The steel-cased Apple Watch with its sapphire crystal will likely be the most durable version, but having said that, the very light-weight Apple Watch Sport in aluminum feels surprisingly solid as well. None of these devices use Gorilla Glass like other Apple products, and they are said to be designed with "impact" in mind. From a fit-and-finish standpoint, they are built excellently – in a manner far removed from other Apple products. While the Apple Watch no doubt feels like something from Apple, it exists in a totally new class, when it comes to use of materials as well as the overall concept of what it even is. There has never been an iPhone designed with a strap for you wrist, nor was it meant to look good with a suit. The Apple Watch was. The various bracelets and straps are not only clever, but really comfortable. The Milanese mesh metal bracelet is "infinitely adjustable" thanks to having a secure magnetic clasp, which is similar to the leather strap that also uses magnets. Unless competitors quickly step up their game, at launch, the Apple Watch could easily make other smartwatches appear primitive by comparison.

For a mass-produced product, the Apple Watch is excellent. While it isn't hand-polished, nor does it have complicated surfaces like those seen on a Swiss timepiece, it is an amazing achievement, not just for Apple, but for the tech industry overall. I've never had what is essentially a high-volume, high-end gadget that felt so good in my hands. The sad thing is that most Apple Watch wearers will not be "watch people," so they really won't have too much to compare it with.

Apple Watch Hands-On: The Wristwatch Just Caught Up To The 21st Century Hands-On

What Type Of Battery Life Can I Expect From The Apple Watch?

About a day of battery life is what you should be able to expect from the Apple Watch. While Apple hasn't outright said it yet, pulling together various statements they have made, as well as direct statements made to me, I am positive you will need to charge your Apple Watch at least once a day. Interestingly enough, the prototype operating system of the Apple Watch I saw didn't have a battery indicator on it yet. I am not even totally sure how Apple will display this information, even though there is a "power reserve indicator" on some of the watch dials they debuted.

What Apple would like to say – but won't – is that they aren't holding back secret battery technology. No one is. Many consumers are sort of out of touch with reality when they demand faster, thinner, lighter, and more powerful devices... that have increasing battery lives. While companies push to create lower power consumption processors, the biggest eaters of battery life are actually screens and connectivity. While software optimization is a big deal (and what Apple is doing now), the reality is that most companies have to work with the existing state of battery technology. If you want a device with more battery life, you simply need a bigger battery. That isn't really an option with a watch.

A possible solution in the future is a means of effectively charging your Apple Watch while on-the-go with movement or light. Even though these are good ideas, standard kinetic or light-powered charging schemes would barely keep up with the juice demands of the Apple Watch or other similar devices. Therefore, until the tech industry as a whole debuts a new form of battery technology, we will have to live with optimization and clever use of power. The Apple Watch does as much as it can by offloading processes to its host iPhone.

Apple Watch Hands-On: The Wristwatch Just Caught Up To The 21st Century Hands-On

Is The Apple Watch Beautiful?

Traditional analog watches have been doing more-or-less the same things for so long, pretty much the only way consumers decide between one watch and another is aesthetic beauty. This includes the overall quality of execution and the extent to which any and all details have been refined. Watch design has become so good, that it has remained a huge industry for a long while after people actually needed wrist watches to tell the time. The luxury watch industry is based on offering emotionally-charged, good-looking watches that serve as lifestyle statements and status symbols for the people who wear them. We often consider finely made watches to be jewelry for men.

Given that, it isn't difficult to see why watch lovers are so intimately concerned with how beautiful a watch is – likely much more than technology users are concerned with the physical design of their products (as compared to their concern for functionality or performance). Apple has for long been the poster child of "attractive tech," a label that may ultimately remain intact, or discarded by consumers when the Apple Watch is released for sale. So, what do I think, is the Apple watch beautiful?

Compared to the way that some of my favorite mechanical watches are beautiful? No. The Apple Watch's beauty, for me, lies in how well it does what it was designed to do, and how nice of a package Apple was able to design for it. The watch industry has long since proven that rectangular watches are difficult to get right, and further shown that minimalist designs are tricky when it comes to making them classics. The first generation Apple Watch is most certainly a watch, but it won't become a wrist watch design icon on its own. Yet, I find that doesn't bother me, because I am interested in it for enough other reasons.

Apple Watch Hands-On: The Wristwatch Just Caught Up To The 21st Century Hands-On

The Apple Watch is very good looking for what it is, and it feels good to hold, wear, and operate. Form follows function in the Apple Watch, but that isn't enough for serious design lovers – especially those who have been wowed by the luxury watch industry for years. We should also consider that Apple needed to create a product that was acceptable to many different people, and also customizable. The Apple Watch succeeds at its mission, but won't receive top design honors from European authorities - at least not for now.

The beauty of most watches for men, is in their ability to make the wearer appear original, and full of character. You simply don't get that out of a piece of technology. Like I said, at least not yet. I remind you, this is the first Apple Watch, and things like design will evolve. Apple knows this, and they should be given a lot of credit for what they have done so far. The Apple Watch is really unlike anything they have done before. Those with an intimate knowledge of what it is like to get a company to produce something "new" for their own culture will appreciate what an ordeal it must have been at Apple and the many internal (and probably entertaining) debates.

Perhaps watch lovers are allowed to be very hard on the Apple Watch design. Apple is in fact asking them to potentially give up something they love for something that in a few years they might not be able to live without. I've personally mentioned that I fully plan on wearing a traditional mechanical watch on one wrist, and an smartwatch on the other in the near future. So where does that leave the general public? Without too much to compare it to, given that they don't have years of high-end watch wearing experience, the Apple Watch is going to look stunning to most. For many people, it will likely be the most high-end timepiece they have ever worn; and I think they will love it.

Apple Watch Hands-On: The Wristwatch Just Caught Up To The 21st Century Hands-On
The 38mm Apple Watch On Milanese Bracelet

Who Should Buy The Apple Watch First?

If all goes well, the Apple Watch will be a new arm of the larger Apple product family. That means there will be the Apple Watch, and the successors thereof. I am pretty sure that with each new model, Apple will integrate more functions to attract even more people. So who should invest into getting a first generation Apple Watch?

I highly recommend the Apple Watch for people who like to playfully communicate with their friends and loved ones. The new communication tools are impressive, and will no doubt prove addictive for young people and those who grew up with technology.

It is also easy to recommend the Apple Watch for people who keep their iPhone in a purse or out-of-the way pocket. Checking, reading, responding to, and dismissing messages from an Apple Watch will make it easier for people to stay on-the-go and not be bogged down each time they need to take out their phone. Used properly, I think the Apple Watch has the potential to save time, versus use more of it. I have yet to test these assumptions, but I anticipate that the notification features of the Apple Watch will prove promising.

Do you love to exercise, and do you love data? Perhaps you don't love to exercise and you want a device to help you do so. Apple isn't innovating in the fitness tracker space too much, but they are offering a solid experience with a typical level of Apple sheen and simplicity. Apple has confirmed that its own employees who tested the Apple watch's health functions ended up being more active. Of course, this is not proof that the Apple Watch helps people lose weight or be healthier, but the potential does exist. By quantifying activity goals into numerical values with achievable results, the Apple Watch incorporates some of the most popular features that many people are increasingly loving about fitness trackers. Apple could help make these tools much more mainstream.

By considering the sensors available in the Apple Watch and the fact that one can download apps for it, the potential utility of the smartwatch is really endless. My prediction is that in the next few years, there will be a number of smartwatches available which will have features most people will really want to incorporate into their lives.

The reaction to the Apple Watch among the watch community has been interesting, but not unexpected. In further discussion of how smartwatches will effect the watch industry I asked the question of how screwed the watch industry is because of the Apple Watch here. Aside from denying it "watch status," they have referred to it as everything from ugly to useless. Once again, this is a sentiment often associated with items that may compete with one's passion or interests, or when an item or company enters a new space. Skepticism is the norm in such instances and whereas traditional watch lovers have more-or-less ignored most smartwatches to this point, they have given the Apple Watch a huge amount of attention - even if has been both bad and good attention.

Given that the Apple Watch is so highly inspired by traditional watches, I think the reaction to it by the watch lover community is worth noting, though it should be understood for what it is by anyone who views it from the outside. I don't think anyone in the watch lover community likes or dislikes smartwatches anymore than anyone else, but they are a lot more highly invested in what they are wearing on their wrist already. Apple's watch, as well as the best that become available from its competitors in the future (mostly will likely run Android Wear), threaten to force a lot of people to potentially make a decision about what is on their wrist. Will people opt for classic design, tradition, style, and collectibility, or will they opt for functionality, connectivity, and convenience in a much more modern package? A lot of watch people at some point soon will face what I call the "Luddite's dilemma..." stick with what you know and love, or brave the promises of the future, with all its uncertainties and learning curves.

Even if in the next year, smartwatches don't exist that have features you really want to include in your life, within a few years, they will. Watch lovers have a lot to look forward to, as well as some difficult decisions to make. In comparison, the general public will - for the first time in a long time - become very interested with what is on their wrist, and many of those wrists will have Apple Watches on them. apple.com

  • kapurkk

    The most compelling feature even for  a person who likes classic watches, is that the beauty of multiple classic dial faces can become easy accessible with the twist of a crown. All this ,  on a stunning display which is even easier to read in the night as it is in the day. Once  someone has comfort with the size/ shape  ( rectangular, round , coal ) / and interchangeable straps is in place I can’t imagine anyone being able to resist.  Of course there will always be  the purists, and those who need watches as a show of their wealth,.

    The concerns on obscolence in tech also need to be considered in perspective, Even a Gen 1 apple watch will always be able to allow the user to change the most important part  of the watch – its dial face .. 
    They can always change it with their mood, occasion  or  style preference. No Rolex or Patek is capable of doing that as yet ! People don’t stop using an old dial face if they still like it !

    Any brand that can use quartz, will also consider OLED… Perhaps we will see 10 years from now a “powered by Apple” display  introduced by the more the daring of the traditional watchmakers ! Maybe a Hublot Big Bang with an OLED !  ( Biver and his successors may not relent so early ) 

    Neither is a  connected phone is not mandatory .. Thats just a design consideration .

    Its needed only when the watch needs to do more that just tell you the time.
    The beauty of the OLED is that … world timer  alarm, and perpetual calendar always come for free !

  • kapurkk I agree that a wide variety of watch faces will appear on people’s  Apple Watches. But they will be very pale imitations of real watch dials and hands. So in that aspect, they won’t take away sales from those watches that they ape.
    A “Gen 1” Apple Watch will have all the appeal and resale value of a first generation iPhone. 
    A basic problem with any good that aspires to be a luxury item is that its popularity works against it. When everyone has one, it ceases to be chic and trendy.  When the iPhone first came out the cool kids (adults actually) had them. Now days junior high kids literally have them. Not many under  16 year olds have Pateks or A. Lange und Sohne or Breguet watches. So no matter what watch face you choose to display on your Apple Watch (which is at its heart the same as literally millions of others like it), it won’t be the luxury watch it mimics, nor will the Apple Watch be  a luxury item on its own merit. Except for the fools who buy the solid gold ones only to discover that a year after they buy it, the Gen 2 Apple Watch will be out and they will have a solid gold antique – the tech world moves too fast for lasting value of gadgets (and this is from a professional software engineer).

  • Fraser Petrick

    “Give me that old-time religion, give me that old-time religion; If it was good enough for Grandpa, it’s good enough for me.”

  • steviecans

    Does ABTW get paid to make positive reviews?

  • SN0WKRASH

    steviecans Good question! We never have, and we never will.  If we did, I could afford to pay a bunch of people to make only positive comments on our invariably positive reviews (not all our reviews lean to the positive, but we don’t waste everyone’s time reviewing watches we don’t think anyone would like), and I would ethically have no problem deleting comments like this one.  It’s not our style. http://www.ablogtowatch.com/editorial-policies/

  • bdekok

    Can we not have these type of comments please. No one ever seems to complain when all the mechanical watches have positive or glowing reviews. Let’s not sink into the childish behaviour one finds in the tech forums. Thank you.

  • Fraser Petrick

    “The Devil hath the power to assume a pleasing shape” – or , from “The Music Man”, – “Oh we’ve got trouble, right here in River City!”

  • bdekok

    Not a favourite analogy for me. I certainly don’t want to have my grand fathers mode of transport as my daily drive. And I don’t agree with every thing he did or chose. I like the Apple watch and I like my mechanical watches, but they’re not the same thing; different emotions. They both go on the wrist and they can both tell the time but they’re not the same. My smart phone can take photos, but it’s not a classic camera. Yet I like both, ditto for the wearable devices.
    I think there’s plenty of room for both.
    Here’s another analogy. A friend of mine has a couple of vintage cars he loves, yet his daily drive is a Lexus. He likes both.

  • Great article, excellent write up. It leaned more on the emotional, which is what this blog has largely been about since the start: the emotional attachment to watches. Looking at it just as a watch, I simply can’t like it. I honestly find it ugly. The Milanese bracelet looks exceptional, but none of the options distract from the awful form factor of the watch itself. Many will disagree, I’m sure when this item is released to the public there will be plenty of overnight lineups to be the one that gets it on day 1, but for me it just looks like a gadget for your wrist, not a watch.
    I can’t help but notce that they went with 2 gold options: yellow and rose. No white gold. Probably because white gold looks a lot like steel, a version they already have. So, why real Rose or yellow gold? If it’s just for the look and not the material, they could have achieved the same result with a really awesome ceramic treatment or other durable high tech coating.
    Waiting for the first request I get to make a strap for an Apple Watch. No traditional lugs, so that will be an interesting event. No doubt that there will be a 3rd party lug adapter for it at some point. What to suggest for a ‘watch’ of many faces….? Full bead stingray might do well, but I don’t know that vintage WWII ammo leather would be all that suited. We’ll see I guess.

  • Fraser Petrick

    bdekok  You’re right, of course. I’m just a little grumpy this morning. The Toronto Maple Leafs will soon be starting  their annual season of heartbreak for me, so I guess I’m a little testy. Please accept my apologies.
    I will admit to a growing apprehension with regards to IT and its seemingly out-of-control pervasiveness. I see too many internet zombies wandering the streets. and it gives this Luddite the willies. But that’s just me.( I’m 70 and remember watching Toast of the Town on a 12″ black and white screen and thinking it was pretty nifty.)
    And by the way, I’m a respectful agnostic, which means, -if I’m up on my labeling –  I can respect others’ religiosity – provided no one gets hurt.

  • OmniRak

    I’ve said this before and I’ll say it again: Once they have a smart watch that replaces the smart phone completely
    with decent battery life, then they’ll have a real watch competitor. That day will
    come.  This is very close but this is not it yet IMO.  When it does truly come in the near future then smart watches will truly compete with utility
    type wrist watches in the quartz, low end mechanical and digital ranges .  
    It won’t replace the Luxury and high end mechanical watches though. Mainly because within 6 months to 2 years a smart watch will ALWAYS be obsolete to a new generation device. It has to be for the companies making them to continue to financially succeed.  Smart watches are definitely the future of electronics and mobility. Soon they will be stiff competition for the likes of Citizen, Seiko, and Casio. Maybe for some of lesser known and lower end “luxury” brands as well. I think the mid-range & high end companies like Rolex, Breitling, Omega, Cartier, A. Lange & Sohne, AP, VC, Patek, and so on don’t have to worry too much.

  • Aytunc

    I would like to start with, i am fully entrenched with the apple ecosystem, from the macbook air to AppleTV to iPhone for a a while now and this watch is make me very nervous. I am ok with always upgrading my phone every two years since an iPhone out of a contract is exactly pretty much the same price for a brand new in contract phone, i can sell my macbook for fairly same amount of money i paid for, put couple hundreds more and get the new one with all bells and whistles. Those are tools for our life, not something personal. Its just a phone and a laptop. A watch is, for me and probably most of us who are on this website. I also don’t know if someone would be ok with dropping 5000$ for a watch that can be obsolete in two years, or even a thousand dollars. I am expecting the steel version to be around 750-1000$ range and if i bought an Oris, Magrette or anything similar around 750$, i expect to be useful in two years, not just become a pretty paperweight

  • BIGCHRONO

    I’m expecting (not hoping) for service depts. to be flooded with after mkt. problems. No matter how extensive quality controls are, there will be  mishaps, causing media frenzies, crazed owners leaping off buildings, Apple’s stock plummeting, & the world being that much worse off for wear.

  • Ulysses31

    There are several assumptions in this report that I don’t think can be justified.  There is definitely a very optimistic slant to the tone here that stretches plausibility somewhat.  Yes, the iWatch (i’m calling it that as I think calling it the “Apple watch” is akin to calling your beloved pet canine “Dog” – very unimaginative) is a watch.  No, it is not a replacement for the kind of watches we’re used to seeing here.  

    You would have to really love the clinical industrial sci-fi film-prop-look to choose one of these as opposed to a Patek, a Rolex, a Tag, a Hamilton or even a Seiko/Citizen.  It’s not a replacement for any high-end watch at all.  Honestly, it looks like Tokyo Flash designed it.  

    You mention that the primary focus of this device  is as a watch, in which case I can already tell the time on any number of watches that are cheaper and last for years.  Sure, you can display different fake watch dial designs on the front, but…. the illusion is hardly convincing.  That would be like saying that wearing a VR headset viewing a virtual island would be equivalent to actually going on holiday there.  One is a crude simulation, the other is the real deal.

    As a fitness tracker, it is inherently flawed.  Fitness-focused watches tend to be far more practical, tougher and more water-resistant than this thing, as well as cheaper.  You don’t worry about damaging a lightweight rubber device.  When you go for a workout you usually take your jewellery OFF, not the other way around – and make no mistake, in an effort to compete with the qualities of a fine traditional watch, they’ve made this into jewellery.  Considering the notorious lack of durability of recent Apple devices, I would be afraid to scratch or dent this thing while exercising even if I could get over the rather feminine styling.  Let’s just say I wouldn’t want to be pumping iron while wearing this.

    In terms of using it as a replacement for your wallet, it has limited potential because they haven’t thought things through.  As you mentioned, security would be a problem. This is a problem that another manufacturer will soon be addressing by adding a fingerprint scanner to their smartwatch.  I’d recommend Apple find a way to integrate a scanner into a cup-shaped crown on the side of their watch.  It would be subtle without ruining the existing design.

    Relying on a phone for most of its functionality is a problem for me.  The benefit of wearing the iWatch is reduced to not having to remove your phone from your pocket.  I sometimes wear a sling bag where the phone is contained in a pocket across the chest.  It is within easy reach.  It can record all the data that this can.  The solution would be to include proper phone functionality into the iWatch as other manufacturers do.  Siri depends on an internet connection of some sort to operate, so instead of borrowing the one on your phone it could do that by itself via a 3G/4G data connection.  Might eat into battery life a bit but it would be no less clumsy than relaying the data to the phone first. 

    Speaking of Siri, I have doubts that people would happily talk to their iWatch for data input, for the same reason that watch-phones haven’t really taken off despite being around for fifteen years.  You’d look like a dick.  Practical and effective on-screen keyboards have been demonstrated for small screens for quite some time (for example, Minuum).  It was a mistake to skip such an option in the iWatch.  

    Several times it is implied that the iWatch will succeed due to the ubiquity of Apple products.  I think this is true and why initial sales will be quite high, but I have doubts that those not indoctrinated to the Apple ecosystem will find it easy to justify buying such a device that is definitely still in “beta” and with no obvious USP.  It’ll be a fashionable choice for those who love the brand and its manufactured ethos.  Remove those buying it “because it’s Apple” and I think you’ll find this won’t be the runaway success story some people are hoping for.

    At the end of the day, this device won’t change the world…again (sorry, couldn’t resist).  People like being individuals.  They like to feel like they are special and that they have a unique identity all their own.  There are so many genuinely unique and special watches already out there.  Wearing a mass-produced item built to a budget in a Chinese factory somewhere doesn’t have any great appeal to me, and the more popular it becomes the more like everyone else you’ll look.  There are some clever touches, some flashes of brilliance here and there as with many Apple products, but it is a hit-and-miss affair.  As a feat of engineering I can respect it somewhat, but not as a finely-crafted machine i’d want to wear.  That’s because it is a smart watch like any other, just with slightly higher production values and a few unique features of dubious value.  The form-factor is familiar, the limitations of other smart-watches are left unresolved here.  Considering their budget and all their hired talent, they have done nothing to improve the current state of affairs.

    It is a little sad that some consider a person a Luddite if they don’t accept that this is the future of watches.  Do a survey – ask the people who read this site what attracts them most to watches – and discover why a lot of people aren’t impressed with duplicated functionality miniaturised and stuck on the wrist.  It’s not because we are scared of change or lack vision, it’s more likely because we can see what truly benefits us is not a few dollars worth of computer chip surrounded by a shiny case, and that it doesn’t reflect the pinnacle of HUMAN achievement and craftsmanship.

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  • shinytoys

    What slays me is that Android has had their watches available for a couple of years, and is doing a luke warm business with them. Apple, playing catch up, introduces their new phone and watch and sells 10 million phones. 6 million on the first day of offering, and those figures did not include the Asian market. I’m gobsmacked…it’s good to be APPLE…!!!!! Might I have a slice , please

  • shinytoys

    bdekok I think I’m related to your friend 🙂

  • Lurch

    My company allowed me to procure an IPhone for work – cost was $199 plus tax in addition to the service plan..  Almost every manager has them now. as the top choice smartphone.  I owned it less than 16 mos and the wifi antenna broke first shortly after the 12 mos warranty and then a few months later, the screen stopped working.  I traded it in for a Samsung Galaxy 4, which works great and is very durable, and will never own an expensive Apple product (iphone, iwatch) again.  The quality and durability (as mentioned in the article) is questionable.  I would rather take my wife to a 5 diamond AAA rated restaurant or Michelin star restaurant for a special dinner than throw away $400 on cheaply made junk.

  • coswallan

    this is not a watch, this is an electronic toy !!!

  • nickyb66

    Horrible, just a chav watch. No class, no style and more importantly, no ‘living thing’ like a Rolex or any other mechanical time piece. Sure there will be many buyers, but you wait until you start seeing them on eBay as people start to get feed up with all this digital lifestyle rubbish and the fact that they need charging up.

  • cableman

    This reads as an ad for Apple. Is it a watch? Not anymore than my cellphone that can also show the time. I don’t understand how anyone can even think of saying “With a starting price of $350, the Apple Watch Sport pretty much blows away everything else in the watch world at this price level”. In 2 years this will be in the trash, how is a $350 Citizen Eco-Drive not a better value proposition – you don’t have to charge it every night and it will last decades. I love gadgets and usually buy the newest tech, but Ariel, let’s be honest – “the Apple Watch isn’t just another gadget that Silicon Valley hopes might be its next cash cow”, of course it is.

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  • ScubaPro

    I think it’s important to note that nobody, yourself included, has worn, handled or tested a production version of the watch. This can make a product look better (or worse) than what people actually can buy when it is released. I always point out when I review a pre-production car or motorcycle as this can be a big deal, as a lot of changes are often made right before they head to dealers. As a result I don’t put much stock in impressions of build quality, fit, and finish, etc. until a production model that is fully functional is available to the public. In the case of the Apple Watch, who knows what a fully functional model will face in terms of battery life, especially in a cold climate. This is not to mention real world durability, because you can put an Otter Box on an iPhone but I can’t see the same possibility w/ the Apple Watch without making it ludicrously bulky (although some folks like that bulk. The bigger G-Shocks are ludicrous to me, but people love them, so whatever).

    I think the Watch will sell well initially, and then the popularity will wane. Hey, I’m already sick of my smart phone because it’s just another screen to stare at like my desktop computer, laptop, touch screens in cars, etc. with no real benefit over more conventional interfaces. There’s such a thing as jumping the shark w/ technology, too.

  • cableman Your smartphone also rarely lasts longer than two or three years, but that doesn’t mean that it isn’t worthwhile.

    We need to escape the notion that a large part of a watch’s value is dictated by how long it lasts.  If my watch tells me about important email, helps me improve my health and lets me unlock my hotel door, those are all valuable.  If it’s not going to become a family heirloom (which you won’t really get in this price class), why not trade some longevity for functionality?  The jury’s out on how well the Apple Watch strikes that balance until there’s a shipping product, but this is at least the first smartwatch that doesn’t scream “geek gadget” — even the Moto 360 is very nerdy.

  • hautejalapeno

    jonfingas cableman I’m with cableman here. Can your phone not already tell you “‘about an important email, help you improve your health and let you unlock your hotel door” all you have to do is build up the enthusiasm to pull it out of your pocket. I’m not saying they will not have some decent functionality in the future, but at present they will be just a surrogate for your smart phone. Also, at present we do expect a watch to last some time, why should we lower our expectations to get information that is also available from another gadget we already have on our person. I also second the opinion that the tech giants are hoping the smart watch is the next cash cow.

  • hautejalapeno

    Zzyzx Orient, perhaps the most underrated watch in the world. I’m all the happy owner of one!

  • thornwood36

    My comments on this particular small wrist sized computer is mirrored with  cableman’s comments  below. Call me old fashioned.

  • ScubaPro I agree that it will not be until a final version of the Apple Watch is available, that anyone can come to a true conclusion about what it is like to live with it.

  • cableman It is entirely possible that the subject of smartwatches and wearable electronics is where I am going to disagree with the sentiments of many traditional watch lovers. In this article I’ve attempted to state the reasons for my thoughts and feeling while discussing the challenges that Apple and other smartwatch makers have. I very seriously anticipate the smartwatch to be a big deal in the near future – es evidenced by our coverage of the segment long before there was an actual Apple Watch. 

    Something like this certainly does conflict with many of the reasons why traditional watch lovers enjoy their timepieces. I totally understand that and have attempted to explain how I hope there is a way to enjoy the best of both worlds – both mechanical and electronic. 

    I don’t think you can compare something like the Apple Watch to a Citizen Eco-Drive on most accounts. These are very different watches and I enjoy them both for very different reasons. The different in functionality and propose use are too distinct. It does go back to the notion that there is really no one “perfect watch,” which is why many of us watch lovers have so many timepieces. 

    Personally I am not bothered by people saying that the Apple Watch is not a watch, and I do certainly understand why people say that. Though I personally disagree. The emotions inherent in this discussion and the prospect of what smartwatches mean to the industry are profound and worth talking about. Once again, no, this isn’t an ad, and that goes for pretty much any article where one of our writers really likes something and perhaps holds a contrarian outlook to what the mechanical watch community feels at that time. I think the most important thing is for everyone to share feelings – good or bad – so that no one need feel isolated in their emotional reactions to this and other products.

  • Zzyzx I think that is totally OK. There are a large group of people that want to wait for technology to become mainstream or prove their utility many times over. New things can be difficult to attach yourself too because they change rapidly and early adopters may need to put up with many evolutionary dead-ends. So if you don’t like smartwatches and the Apple Watch – no worries! It isn’t like we are going to stop covering traditional mechanical watches.

  • Ulysses31 These are all excellent points and things the industry should consider. I didn’t mean to call anyone a Luddite, but created a term to refer to a particular sentiment or emotion some people harbor in regard to new technology. If you’d like to suggest a better term we can go with that.

    I am not always optimistic about new technology, but I am open-minded and have been keenly aware of what is going on in the tech world for about 20 years now. I spend as much time there as I do in the watch world. Can you blame me for getting excited when these two worlds are the crossroads of connecting in a way that I personally would not have been able to imagine five years ago? 

    Do I get excited about wearing an analog quartz watch? No. Do I get excited about a computer on your wrist? No that often. Do I get excited about the merging of watch and tech culture for a future that no one can clearly see? Yes.

  • SuperStrapper Thanks. I actually spent so much time “explaining myself” because I knew for sure that people would assume I had some ulterior motive to praising the future of the smartwatch. I don’t want anyone to confuse my thoughts and if they disagree with me, at least they know where I am coming from. I do look forward to seeing some for the first straps you make for Apple Watches.

  • steviecans One again, and for the record, no. We do not accept money to make positive reviews. We never have, and we never will. The reason we go into so much detail is to explain each conclusion we come to and weigh both the positives and negatives of an issue – as I feel we did here. When there are issues left to be discussed then the thoughtful community can comment and continue the discussion in anyway that they like. Thank you for allowing us to clarify this again. We realize that with the online media community searching for new revenue streams and traditional news outlets often being accused of sneakily integrating sponsored content, this is an important issue on many people’s minds. As the other moderator pointed out, we have an editorial policies posted on aBlogtoWatch that explains all this clearly for anyone who is interested.

  • Ulysses31

    aBlogtoWatch Ulysses31 It’s an interesting thing, “tech culture”.  I’m trained in I.T and have been programming computers since I was ten.  I have always been keenly interested in technology, but not from the mainstream aspect that seems to dominate society today.  Computers have revolutionised the world and are furthering our endeavours in space, medicine, aerospace and manufacturing to name just a few examples.  This is the aspect of computer technology I can genuinely get behind and what I see real value in.  However, what most people think of nowadays when they are asked about technology is a smart=phone or a smart-watch or something similar.  It is these sorts of computers that are idolised and admired; devices which don’t really further humanity much at all and are disposable, winding up as very expensive trash on mountains of e-waste in third world countries giving little kids there cancer.  Computer science has the capacity to be a great and noble and world-changing field – how far we have fallen when we get more excited about such disposable technology.  To put it another way, these sorts of devices contribute to our society about as much as Bieber contributes to music.  There may be some cases where such a device is genuinely useful, but I think the public could take it or leave it.  All I see is yet another electronic fashion gadget that will eventually fall from favour due to changing fashions and obsolescence when a new model comes around, having wasted loads of energy and material resources to create.  Hopefully Apple will institute a recycling policy for when people start tossing these in the trash when they want to upgrade.

    I am not afraid of new technology; I am bothered by what poorly-conceived technology can do to people’s lives.  Perhaps i’m a little too naive and idealistic to expect people to be able to use their memories to store simple information, learn a little impulse control so they can fight the urge to Google the answer to some random question that idly pops into their heads, or realise that if they just moved around a little more and didn’t eat crap, they wouldn’t look like slobs.

  • hautejalapeno jonfingas cableman Ah, but if you’re going to go down that path, why do you need a watch at all?  After all, you can tell the time on your phone.
    And there’s the rub.  The whole point of a watch, at least as we’ve known it for a while, is to put some functionality on your wrist with a dash of style.  It’s just that we’re finally at a point where the functionality part involves a lot more than timekeeping.  I like the idea of a watch that saves me from interrupting conversations by checking my phone, or spares me from buying a dedicated fitness tracker.  It does involve big sacrifices right now, but I think there are plenty of people willing to make that sacrifice rather than wait years.

  • emoonshot

    You most certainly COULD have had a slice if you’d seen the writing on the wall back in ’96. Apple stock has been a shining beacon in my portfolio for almost 20 years now. The company and it’s stock has wildly outperformed even my most optimistic original expectations. Everyone’s expectations, for that matter.
    That said, MP3 players had been on the market for years before the first iPod, there were a great many smartphones before the iPhone, and a decade of awful tablets before the iPad. Apple, ‘modern’ Apple, at least, has always closely observed a market segment prior to entering it. Obviously that’s a strategy that pays off.
    P.S. Besides the shares, I own very few Apple products.

  • Evitzee

    Until average people see the real deal no one, especially Apple, knows how this brand new industry will fare.  There have been many new ‘can’t miss’ products that, well, missed.  I remember when the Segway was in development…..there was a breathless murmur going around in the tech world that the product, code named ‘Ginger’, was going to revolutionize how humans lived.  It was the equivalent of the invention of the printing press, the electric lightbulb, etc.  And what do we have today?  A very quirky niche product that all of us could do without. So, will the Apple watch be as significant as the light bulb, or will it be like the invention of the Segway PT?  We will have to wait and see.

    Ariel may plan to wear a conventional mechanical watch on one wrist and an Apple Watch on the other……but he will be in a tiny group of people who will do that.  Wearable technology is very tricky and has not fared well in the past…..there is real reluctance to wear a Google Glass because it’s a bit creepy in it’s look and technology.  Apple can do all sorts of work and make the fit and finish of the device super fine….but in the end it is still an electronic tool, no matter how many faces you can display on the dial.  People like to look cool, but they don’t want to look like robots, which is why we all don’t wear uniforms like you see in sci fi movies.  If any company can invent a market it is Apple, but I really think this product will have limited long term appeal.

  • mgennone

    Even at a $400 price range you find people love their watch brands….especially the smaller brands. A typical phone or tech gadget lasts 1-2 years….this will be obsolete within the same time period. That in of itself will not lure anyone who loves watches and, or fashion.

  • bdekok

    mgennone I agree the obsolescence issue is there.  However, I can’t see Apple ignoring it, especially for the gold edition models.  I can’t see a case as a consumer where I’d buy a gold model at an inflated price that gold typically draws and see it become obsolete in 2 years or even one.   Surely Apple would be considering a replacement or upgrade plan for consumers that purchase such models.  The gold value alone would substantiate such business case.

  • sawilsonorg

    It’s hideous. This paid advertisement for it does not change the fact that it’s a dorky wrist computer. It’s square. It’s ugly. It’s definitely not a Moto 360.

  • cableman

    aBlogtoWatch cableman Ariel, I understand your thoughts on this new gadget, but saying that “the Apple Watch isn’t just another gadget that Silicon Valley hopes might be its next cash cow” is disingenuous to say the least. The sales of tablets plummeted and they had to come up with the next cash cow. There is nothing that revolutionary here and the whole article reads the same way tech journalists proclaimed the death of desktops and laptops when tablets were introduced. We will soon enough move on to smartclasses, smartrings, etc. This is 100% a cash cow, you cannot honestly say that Apple, Samsung, etc are investing in smartwatches because of their horological inclinations.

  • cableman aBlogtoWatch It is entirely possible that my statement is perhaps easy to misinterpret. I hope that I did not come across as suggesting that the Apple Watch is the death knell to competing products. Rather that I personally believe the smartwatch segment is something that the consumer wants, and has been wanting for years. Further, that it is an evolving segment, and one that I believe will mature into one that provides genuine convenience and utility to many people. Of course the tech industry is interested in making money, all companies are. However, I don’t think that the tech industry will need to convince people to use smartwatches, but rather that consumers will eventually discover good reasons why they will want to incorporate them into their lives. Thanks for allowing me to elaborate on the statement.

  • Oklahomaultrarunning

    Thanks for the review. I would probably also wear 2 watches.
    Recently, I spent 3 weeks using my iPhone with headphones and Siri’ help. I’m certain that having a smart watch would have made my tasks w email, text and phone much easier than the earplugs, which are miles ahead of going to the phone for all, plus wearing a watch for gps, chronography, heart rate.
    My friend was wearing Pebble watch, and told me how effective it was over just utilizing the phone.
    Ari, , you’ve been accused of drinking the Apple Juice. So what! You’ve done your job, and one that you’ve done very well , once again. I’m not likely to rush into 2015 for a Apple watch purchase, but I’ll adopt it once the bugs are worked out and the features expanded. My first iPhone was the 3s.
    Thanks for the review.

  • ReneStein

    Lurch

  • bdekok Apple doesn’t  do “upgrade” in the traditional sense of  a trade-in or a partial hardware upgrade. Their ideas (since the 128K Mac) has always been that you buy a new model every year or two and what you do with the old one is your problem. I guess Gazelle.com will be offering to buy your Apple Watch “in any condition” in the very near  future. In 2 years people’s old Gen 1 Apple Watches will start to show up in the 4rd world via buyers like Gazelle.  Just imagine how cool you feel when your now coveted “jewelry/watch” is on the wrist of a 3rd world person before your current cell phone contact is up.

  • “It is a watch” or “it is wearable wrist technology”, which one?

    Honestly, the iWatch is to fine watches what digital LED ones were to them. Apple is not the first tech company to foray in watches. Texas Instruments was perhaps the first successful attempt, but it didn’t last for long, both in the market and in our hearts.

  • supermundane

    In response to apparent inevitability of Appl’es vision of the future I think Ariel here might be suffering from ‘The Borg Complex’
    thefrailestthing.com/2012/06/18/the-borg-complex/

  • bdekok

    MarkCarson bdekok I realise how Apple has done it in the past (and will probably continue with the bulk of their products), but the new product (watch) can’t survive in that vein.  I fully expect that the aluminium model will be a throw away.  Stainless Steel will be dependant on it’s initial price, but will probably be treated like all other Apple products as you suggest.  It is the Gold model that worries me.  I can’t see anyone but the “much, much more money than sense” crowd purchasing it.  And I don’t see how Apple can continue with their current policies and create a decent market presence for the watch if they persist with that policy.  Specifically the gold edition as you can’t throw away that amount of gold, that’s ludicrous.  This is a new market for them (fashion) and I think they’ll have to address it differently to succeed.

  • bdekok All tech products are throw away. The gold “Edition” (stupid name) watch will have melt value – that is about its only distinction. Cheers.

  • bdekok

    MarkCarson bdekok I fully understand that.  But that won’t wash.  They have to provide a better upgrade path or it won’t sell.   It will have a large markup as all gold watches do and will require significant support changes to match its exclusivity.  Unless, and this is a big IF,  If The gold “Edition” is only dearer by the gold value (approx $1200), then existing support structures can be maintained, but I can’t see that happening.

  • bdekok While it will be out of character for Apple, at best I can only see them doing a trade-in program. They won’t be upgrading your actual Apple Watch.  Beyond the “much, much more money than sense” crowd you mentioned, the gold watch will be an odd duck for Apple as their current distribution/outlet model is not where luxury dollars are being traditionally spent. So it will be interesting to see if they place the product in upscale outlets or not. Dropping $5 – $10K in an Apple Store for a watch will be a strange thing to see. Equally odd will be to see a jeweler or fine watch retailer selling any smart watch. I’m not saying it won’t happen, only that this is a disruptive idea that may or may not happen in the near term.

  • bdekok

    MarkCarson bdekok I agree.  That’s what makes this an interesting space to watch 🙂

  • bdekok We share an employer Bernie.

  • bdekok

    MarkCarson bdekok We do?  Which one?

  • bdekok 3 letters, does D work in respective countries.

  • hautejalapeno

    jonfingas hautejalapeno cableman Hey Jon. If the only reason to wear a watch is functionality then the mechanical watch would be dead. There is no need to wear a watch to tell the time these days. Why does anyone dream of owning a JLC, Rolex, PP or otherwise, is it because these high end pieces are functionally better that a G shock? The watch is a hugely personal item and probably the only opportunity a man has of wearing something of real craft and significance on his body. The watch doesn’t just tell you time, it tells you about the owner.

  • bdekok

    MarkCarson bdekok Ok, here’s a popular answer I’ve been giving lately.  “Wow, that goes back a few years”.

  • hautejalapeno

    aBlogtoWatch cableman Hey ABTW. I would say you do have to compare the watches (smart vs traditional) as you have to choose to wear only one at at time (unless people are planning on double wristing) 🙂

  • Borys Bozzor Pawliw

    One analyst I spoke to explained it to me this way when I expressed skepticism about the Apple watch: he told me that I needed to get the notion out of my head that this was going to be an instrument to measure time and ” do some other things I may mind useful”. This was a device that was to use the “personal real estate” of my wrist to explore what various technologies were able to achieve to make me happier, healthier, safer, more informed and more productive in a more effective way than using other solutions.

    OK, that was an impressive answer. I now get the goal, just really the how and how effectively is left to discover…

  • Borys Bozzor Pawliw I think Steve Jobs’ ghost lives.
    “This was a device that was to use the “personal real estate” of my wrist
    to explore what various technologies were able to achieve to make me
    happier, healthier, safer, more informed and more productive in a more
    effective way than using other solutions.”
    Now substitute “penis” for “wrist” and this statement sounds just as promising. So they could have made a smart condom just as easily for all the marketing speak.

  • supermundane I did always think that square ship was cool. I think Apple might be responding to my vision of the future. Clearly as a guy who writes about watch I am a proponent of the wrist being a fantastic place for useful gadgets.

  • Oklahomaultrarunning My pleasure. I’ve been accusing of drinking much nastier juice in the past. This one probably doesn’t taste that bad.

  • sawilsonorg The Moto 360 design is a great concept but Motorola hasn’t really been able to get it to work as reliably as most consumers want. I agree that a round-cased smartwatch is a great idea, but one with the right amount of performance doesn’t seem to be here yet. You are certainly allowed to think that this or any other product is hideous. No one will try to change your mind. Can you explain why you feel that to write something positive I must be paid? I appreciate the compliment but I’m simply not that important yet.

  • MikeJones123

    I am a Rolex wearer and owner of various Tag’s and Omega’s, I also have a MacBook Pro, an insanely large amount of money ‘tied up’ in my iTunes library, and I use apple TV, especially for the kids movie collection. I use my iPhone to read the news, charge my car, check my bank accounts, read email, play music, find my way about and yes… tell the time.
    I am both a huge watch fan and an Apple fan.

    After the qualifier, an opinion…
    The pocket watch morphed into the wrist watch. The reason? Convenience.
    Then ensued 60 years of selling watches based on their functional benefits. Waterproofness, accuracy, convenience etc. An Omega went to the moon – reliability. A Rolex swam the channel – Waterproofness. Then Quartz happened. 

    Functional benefits became irrelevant and the Swiss watch industry (so reliant on charging people more for accuracy) almost went completely bust. The only thing that saved them was turning the watch into a status symbol.
    The watch has become a product of marketing. Without the vast amount of money spent communicating to non-Patek owners that you, the Patek owner are; rich, successful, good looking etc. Then there would be no social capital gained from wearing one. For 30 years the prices of Swiss watches have outstripped inflation, and huge volumes of watches have been sold and marketed, all off the back of pretty ubiquitous and aggressive marketing.

    When was the last time you watched a sporting event or caught a plane and didn’t see watch advertising. It’s everywhere, in the background of everything… World cup and Hublot, Rolex and golf, Tag and racing…. Every newspaper, magazine and website. Billions $ every year…literally.

    So, for all of the post-rationalisation about design, beauty, timelessness etc. that most watch owners cite as reasons for ownership, the fundamental truth is that people buy a watch to communicate status – whether financial or taste.

    You walk into a meeting with a Rolex on, people will know what that means. Walk in with a Casio, it will say something else.This is because the non-wearer has been told through advertising, what it means and what to think about the wearer.
    Understanding this social contract is intrinsic to the success or otherwise of the Apple Watch.

    If the Swiss watch industry can still continue to convince the world that the mechanical watch is the only way to say to that girl at the bar, or the man in the meeting that you are rich and successful then they will be alright. If people ‘switch’ to wearable tech, then we will probably want to use something else to communicate that I am rich and successful.. Of all the status symbols, the watch is still a new comer to the businesses. 

    So would I wear one, yes.
    Would I ‘swap’, no.

    Not yet.

    But I think this is really just the ‘end of the beginning’ for smart watches v mechanical watches.. The opening salvoes have been fired. 

    Smart watches are only going to get better, whereas the Swiss watch industry is really at the zenith of what is achievable with mechanical watches. There’s only so much more innovation that can be achieved with a mechanical movement.

    Samsung and Apple could easily outspend the Swiss watch industry in marketing, a valuable element in success.
    Even if they don’t do status, the other thing that could happen is that these things become so useful and you become so dependent on them that they just start to assume the position on the wrist. The mechanical watches get worn less and less.  So for me, this is truly about status. The wrist for status or the wrist for usefulness. 

    I think it will be a 20 year battle and I don’t know who will win, but one things for sure it will be interesting.

  • sawilsonorg

    aBlogtoWatch That sound like Apple bias to me. The Moto 360 runs fantastic, and is widely considered the best smartwatch money can buy. It’s definitely the best looking one, and the one that has resonated with consumers and experts.

  • sawilsonorg aBlogtoWatch I am a user of both Apple and Android products while my PC is Window’s based, and I have no bias in this regard. Consumers interested in a smartwatch should always consult with a range of opinions and take all relevant information into context. They should also use products themselves before making a purchase decision. I personally am excited to see more hardware in the future which is more up to the task of running Android Wear, an operating system that I understand is powerful, but resource heavy.

  • sawilsonorg

    aBlogtoWatch So you are pushing an unreleased product on us that you couldn’t possibly have spent any time with, while talking ill of a product you admittedly haven’t even tried, choosing instead to repeat rumors about the Moto 360? Am I understanding you correctly?

  • sawilsonorg aBlogtoWatch That is a good point if it sounds like I am pushing one product that isn’t available over one that is. That isn’t my intent, and I hope people notice the many times I suggest that we still need to see a final version of the Apple Watch before coming to any conclusions about its performance. I am however saying that performance is an issue with smartwatch, and one that certain brands have been lax with in their releases. I’ve personally tested more smartwatches with poor performance than ones with exceptional performance. I really am not pushing any product over another, but rather commenting on how different companies are approaching similar challenges. The bottom line is that we can’t really compare or contrast products in the quickly evolving smartwatch space with the Apple Watch until sometime next year.

  • sawilsonorg

    aBlogtoWatch I’m going to tone down my language a bit, and suggest you pick up a Moto 360 for review. Rather than trying to recreate a computer on your wrist, the Android Wear mentality is putting useful content there rather than trying to make a dorky wrist computer. It’s a completely different approach that has yielded an outstandingly useful and polished user experience. Like a lot of products, the Moto 360 had teething problems that were fixed with a software update. The problem is the Moto 360 is the most desired gadget in the world at the moment, so it’s very hard to find. I believe Best Buy may still have them in stock.

  • sawilsonorg aBlogtoWatch I think that is good advice. To properly cover the entirety of the smartwatch market right now we should certainly include reviews about the best Android Wear, Apple, and other smartwatch devices and operating systems on aBlogtoWatch. It is a positive thing that each of these devices has a different approach to being useful, and no one product is going to be best for everyone. We will certainly work to feature it in the future. Thanks for the good thoughts.

  • shnxx

    This was a well-written, thought-provoking article.

    But one question I have is whether you had a special demo unit available to test in order to write this review or not.

  • shnxx To the best of our knowledge Apple isn’t currently offering final test units until the software and product is closer to being commercially available. So these are still early demo units and some weren’t fully functional.

  • emenezes There’s a slight parallel (disruptive technology), but I think there’s a fundamental difference here.

    With LEDs (and quartz, for that matter), it was simply a change in how watches did what they were already doing: telling time.  You got different visuals and maybe a built-in calculator, but that’s it.  Smartwatches actively redefine what a watch *is*.  They tell the time, but they’re also computing platforms.  There’s so much added functionality that I can’t see them being relegated to niche or fad status, at least not in the long run.

  • Galvan

    The watch it self is very nice, cool design and cool screen options, however this watch is a completly different machine; it is a small computer that cannot be compared with a real watch. I am sure that I will buy one, but it will be just for fun and to wear something different from time to time, but this does not means that it will take the place of my other watches, nor like it better than a real watch. Is just a new kid on th block, nothing else. I believe that the higher demand will come from younger people.
    Bottom line, great computer watch, it will be good to try it. Watch makers don’t worry, it is just technoligy, and technology changes every single day.
    Regards,
    LG

  • dan38bz

    Honestly, I would not take for serious much of the things Ariel Adams says. He’s just a glorified marketing agent. Huge thread on WUS about this issue. Play to get paid right?

  • dan38bz If anyone has evidence to the effect that I am a marketing agent it will be the first I am learning of it. Further, I believe you are misquoting the popular term which is “pay to play,” you mixed it up there a bit.

  • aBlogtoWatch sawilsonorg Except that Apple is not in the smartwarch market yet.  Unfortunately, your reporting so extensively and more than once on an Apple product that does not exist and when you promote it above other existing smartwatches, it does come across as bias at best or sellout at worst.  The iWatch is nothing but vaporware and the fact that it gets so much airtime is shameful to all the press, not only to ABTW.

  • thornwood36

    aBlogtoWatch dan38bz
    What a terrible accusation to make against someone who in my opinion has created a great website. From the cheaper end of the market to outer space prices i have always found his reviews ( and those of his colleagues ) have been fair, honest, and well balanced. 
    .

  • TedT

    bdekok MarkCarson as someone who bought a 128K Mac in March of 1984 I can tell that you are absolutely full of it:  Apple did indeed upgrade 128k Macs to “Fat Macs”.  Can’t remember all the details, but you brought your Mac into your local dealer – in my case McGraw Hill Bookstore in New York City, and  few hours(?) later you walked out with an upgraded machine.  There have been numerous upgradable Apple products since.

    Obviously I have no inside knowledge of their Apple Watch plans, but at least lets tell the truth about the past.

  • Borys Bozzor Pawliw

    emenezes I am often shocked at how emotional both pro and anti Apple sentiment can become on mobile phone and technology websites. But to call this article biased is ridiculous. This is a very well conceptualised, analysed and written article about a piece of technology that has generated massive interest in the mainstream press. Maybe I am out of touch, but I can’t recall a watch launch ever making the 6:00pm prime time news around the world. Apple’s Watch has and it’s only to be expected due to Apples disruptive reputation. It

  • sawilsonorg

    What the mainstream valley press cares to report on is completely pointless because they live in a reality distortion field, and most a paid off like The Verge, Engadget, etc. So they’ll always favor mediocre Apple products. The bias is annoying and pervasive, and we are finally seeing real backlash over the practice of paid advertisements pretending to be real reviews because of TheVerge getting busted accepting a trip to iceland with one of Apple’s staff photographers to make what ended up being an iPhone 6 commercial pretending to be a review, and Joan Rivers apparently getting paid to say nice things about the iPhone 6, and her fabricated review showing up on Facebook despite her being dead at the time. So you’ll see a lot of people react to overly flowery and obviously biased pro-apple stories whether they have any merit or not. Apple is in a steep decline. iBeacons was a failure. iRadio was a failure. The Beats acquisition was a failure. The iPhone 5C failed to capture the Chinese market, and Apple is downright scared. Their quality has suffered immensely. 3 iCloud hacking scandals, Bendgate, Jennifer Lawrence suing them, etc. They still haven’t patched the Shellshock exploit on OSX either and are getting hell for that today. We may be watching the beginning of the end for them if they don’t turn things around.

  • TedT bdekok MarkCarson I stand corrected. I did hear about Fat Macs at the time. How much upgrading did they do after the 128  to 256 upgrade? Compared to PCs with an open architecture, Apple has lagged in the ability to upgrade hardware. So while I was incorrect in this instance, my overall concern remains that the Apple Watch may not see any upgrades other than software updates.

  • Borys Bozzor Pawliw

    aBlogtoWatch Well Ariel, welcome to the worst of the web – discussions about Apple products and business. I hope the rude and disrespectful tone that some people are writing with is not discouraging you too much: this is the sort of stuff that occurs as a matter of course in any discussion about Apple on just about every online article you care to name. Part of the wider Apple vs Google vs Windows war, now extending into wearables. 

    Never get this much emotion from a Patek Phillipe vs Vacheron Constantine debate!

  • Borys Bozzor Pawliw aBlogtoWatch Used to be (and still is) that the  word “Rolex” was traffic gold for a website. I’ll bet that as of  now “Apple Watch” is much the same (but perhaps to a largely different audience).
    Just toss an “Apple bomb” into a blog or forum and stand back!

  • joaohornburg

    MarkCarson Borys Bozzor Pawliw are you retarded or what?

  • blueboompony

    Borys Bozzor Pawliw aBlogtoWatch Yeah, watch blogs are going to be introduced to the world of tech geeks and their vast arsenal of personality disorders. Ignore them, Ariel. I’m a recovering ex-geek, and I can assure you tech geeks are, for the most part, not even worth acknowledging. They’re utter filth.

  • blueboompony

    Borys Bozzor Pawliw I’ve been involved in some discussions here at work about possible ad hoc behavior when multiple Apple watches are in proximity to one another. Lots of possibilities.

  • blueboompony

    joaohornburg MarkCarson Borys Bozzor Pawliw He’s probably one of those tech geeks. Take their age and divide by ten to get the effective age of their emotional and social maturity. Ignore the filthy little thing.

  • blueboompony

    sawilsonorg aBlogtoWatch And that sounds liek Android bias. Go away, geek. No one cares about you or your disorders.

  • bdekok

    blueboompony Borys Bozzor Pawliw aBlogtoWatch LOL.  Just imagine a lot of Sheldon Cooper’s, but not as nice.  Sorry, Big Bang Theory reference.

  • GaranceD

    I haven’t been at a watch-specific site before, and I don’t know if that makes my observations unwelcome.  (not so much from Ariel, as for everyone else here who does follow watch-related blogs and has strong opinions about their favorite watches).

    My feeling is that some higher-tech watch will eventually earn a place on people’s wrists.  This doesn’t necessarily mean it will “win” over traditional watches — mainly because there are a lot of people I see who don’t wear any watch at all.  Their wrist is already empty, so some new device isn’t going to displace any existing watch.

    I don’t know if Apple will be the company to produce that higher-tech device.  And if that higher-tech device does fail, I expect it will be due to the demands on battery life.  I am almost certain that I’d buy an AppleWatch (at $350-$500) *IF* the battery charge lasted a full week.  However, that isn’t going to happen, not with this first attempt.  And I’m certain I will not buy one if I cannot depend on the charge lasting more than 8 hours, no matter how many nice features are implemented on the device.

    Right now I don’t know what the battery life will be for the way I will use it, so I cannot predict if I’ll buy one.  But it’s definitely a very interesting product category.

  • blueboompony

    bdekok blueboompony Borys Bozzor Pawliw aBlogtoWatch The raging personality disorders is what drove me away. It was always there back in the day, but the geekverse has become this sick, insular subculture that lashes out at anything that doesn’t worship the same things they do. They call Apple customers a cult, but then they act like Scientologists. They turn the comments of every article about Apple on the Internet into a war zone, and hurl invective at people that would make bigots blush, and all over what phone someone bought. It’s a shallow, demented subculture that Hollywood really needs to stop fetishizing so these braying manbabies can crawl back under their rocks.

  • blueboompony

    bdekok mgennone I’m wondering if Apple will have a healthy trade in policy on the Watch.

  • blueboompony

    MarkCarson bdekok Well, no, that’s the shallow consumer market idea. A lot of us use our Apple devices and computers for 8-10 years or even more. I have a G4 tower that’s still running things in my workshop.

  • bdekok

    blueboompony bdekok Borys Bozzor Pawliw aBlogtoWatch One thing I’ve always appreciated about this site (and others like it) is the (in the past) gentlemanly aspect of all the participants.  Everybody enjoyed discussing the latest watch trends and reminiscing the traditions and history.  A very relaxing and rewarding experience.  But now with the introduction of smart watches, we’ll see the emergence of all the tech fans and haters.  Shame.

  • bdekok

    blueboompony bdekok mgennone I’m hoping that they’ll do something like that.

  • blueboompony

    jonfingas cableman A guy at my work still has the original iPhone. Devices last as long as you want until you manage to destroy them or something.

  • StefanKozlowski

    Thank you for such a detailed and well thought out article. I found it very interesting and thought provoking. I’m intrigued by exactly how the Apple Watch could integrate into my daily routine and I’m looking forward to more detailed reviews once it gets released. 

    I’m also sorry that you had to suffer the slings and arrows of the conspiracy theory crowd too. Some folks seem to become unhinged over the oddest things.

  • Juwon Wee

    I agree with your assessment that with Apple Watch, Apple Inc. has specifically targeted and entered the watch market, and not the smartwatch market . Others can vehemently deny and argue otherwise, but we will start seeing smartwatch makers starting to aim for the higher-end watch category to avoid being left behind.
    Much like when the iPad finally came out and people couldn’t get their collective minds around this giant-maxi-iPhone, this current confusion around the Apple Watch will also pass, and become another huge market for Apple. This is their 4th platform following the Mac, iPhone, and the iPad. This is another great pull for developers wanting to be at the leading edge of the app gold rush. This will be a growing platform like the first iPhone; with each iteration being able to do more.
    Enjoyed your analysis and writing!
    Thanks!

  • sawilsonorg

    blueboompony You are why nobody respects Apple anymore. Users like you. That, and Apple getting busted paying for reviews so you can’t trust them anymore.

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  • sawilsonorg

    blueboompony Hateful users like you are ruining the perception people have of Apple. You aren’t doing them any favors.

  • DanAndersen

    shinytoys I’m not sure why you find that phenomenon so hard to understand, shinytoys. Apple has built a well deserved reputation for doing things (mostly) right and for standing behind their products in every way. People appreciate that.

  • SN0WKRASH

    GaranceD Welcome.  I hope we see you more often on our watch-specific site 🙂

  • Borys Bozzor Pawliw

    Ah, now I see why so many new people have come here: Apple guru John Gruber of DaringFireball fame has linked to this article: get ready for a rollercoaster ride…

  • DanAndersen “standing behind their products in every way”
    As in our antenna is a design flaw, can we give you a rubber band? Ha ha ha. 
    Hey, no company is perfect, including Apple. And as consumers it’s fair for us to call them out when they screw up.

  • sawilsonorg

    Here’s the thing, we are watch people. If I’m a customer with a favorite Breitling or Rolex bracelet, It’s going to fit perfectly on a Moto 360 because it was designed by watch people. So you can put an expensive (for good reason) bracelet on it. To replace the bracelet on this eyesore from Apple? Well, get in your car (because you actually drive yourself around) and go to wal-mart. Because that’s what Apple is. A wal-mart brand. Then stand in line with people that enjoy that type of thing to pay what you’d tip a concierge for a flimsy piece of ill fitting junk that doesn’t even have standard lug sizes. Apple isn’t “ferrari”. They are honda. You don’t buy an Apple phone if you can afford the best. You buy Vertu. Because then you also get VIP access to the world cup. Apple is for folks pretending to be wealthy. And there’s nothing wrong with that. Just, know your audience. The Apple watch isn’t for me. I’m a watch guy. I’ll wait for Vertu or Breitling to make my dorky watch.

  • sawilsonorg

    Juwon Wee :If it was for watch people, it would take standard bracelets, and you wouldn’t be buying it at wal-mart. Apple is a wal-mart brand.

  • sawilsonorg

    DanAndersen shinytoys There’s a reason you can’t buy Breitling watches at wal-mart. There’s a reason you can’t buy Vertu phones at wal-mart. But you can buy casio watches, and citizen. Oh, and Apple sells lots of stuff at wal-mart. I’ll wait for a premium maker to make my fancy computer watch. I don’t want to have to go to wal-mart to buy a band for my watch. I’ll just buy a watch that I can put my favorite breitling bracelet on.

  • 87nelson

    sawilsonorg Vertu is a Chinese phone in a snob case.

  • 87nelson

    sawilsonorg Juwon Wee stop shiping Moto 360, nobody is going to buy it. If the problem is bracelets, soon enough there will be adapters for 22mm or other sizes.

  • sawilsonorg

    87nelson Vertu is handmade in the UK. Poor people say bad things about Rolex also. You get what you pay for. Some of us can afford the best of things, and aren’t buying Apple products.

  • sawilsonorg

    87nelson sawilsonorg Juwon Wee A watch with a cheap 100 dollar bracelet is already a watch I’m not interested in buying. My bracelet for my datora was worth as much as three of these weird dorky watches from Apple. Just the bracelet.

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  • LapYoda

    Good grief.  It seems that just uttering the words “Apple Watch” three times online provokes, Beetlejuice-like, more invective than a discussion on Rolex pricing.

    People really need to chill out on this.  It’s a new product, nothing more.  There will always be advantages and disadvantages to it.  There will be competing products, some good, some bad.  Some people will buy it, some will not.  ‘Twas always thus.  I like Apple products and I think this has a lot of really neat features, but I think I’ll pass on this one.  No big deal.  It’s just another choice in the market, and merely discussing it shouldn’t prompt name-calling and accusations of bribery.

  • iamcalledryan

    I think people may be confusing the column inches on this website for favouritism when it is more objective than that. Regardless of what you think of the look or functionality of this watch it represents something very significant to the watch industry – and that is why Ariel would be foolish not to discuss it at length. Apple has the combined capital, innovation, and market share that enables it to deliver a game-changer and that is what this product (or subsequent versions) represents. The Motorolla version may actually be a better product, in fact it could be identical, the fact is that Apple is the only vehicle to deliver something of a real disruption and threat to our Swiss friends – again this is just an objective fact based on the above – the only caveat I would say to that is that some sort of technological innovation could drive a competitor forward – like the ability to package independant GPS, SIM, bluetooth, all into something small, sexy and with long battery life – but again, few companies will be ploughing anything as much as Apple into R&D here right now.
    Ariel is dedicating his time to discuss, speculate, review, and perhaps promote, a product that is marking a change in direction for what we wear on our wrists (if not you, the guy next to you) and that is why we are discussing it here. Apple do not need to pay people like Ariel to promote them, Apple are not a mom and pop shop. I believe that it is not the hardocore watch enthusiast that Apple require to break even and beyond – but instead the youngster who isn’t concerned about what is on his wrist – if anything at all. No one can tell for sure, and of course it may turn out that this is a flash in the pan or that some andriod device takes the crown in the end; but I don’t think it is too radical to say that this product will be recognized as the cause of this revolution, even if it is actually not.

  • eugeneyk

    Galvan While I understand your sentiment, the article briefly touched on how the Apple Watch may be disruptive to the traditional watch industry. The wrist is the perfect place to put glance-able information. The watch industry has known this for more than a century. The Apple Watch is wanting a piece of that action. Not specifically the watch industry and its customers, but a place on your own wrist, which is finite. This is similar to how Youtube and Facebook are competing with TV, not directly in the same market, but by competing over people’s time, which is finite and mostly zero-sum. The Apple Watch may not be the perfect timepiece, but it augments that with innumerable features provided by software. Like the iPhone that masked itself as a phone but turned out to be a pocketable personal computer with a phone feature, the Apple Watch has masked itself as a watch, but will turn out to be a wearable personal computer with a watch feature. The benefits of having such a personal computing device will gradually earn more and more wrists and time on those wrists. Traditional watches can be swapped on a whim, but the major benefits of a smart watch can only be got with continuous use. Certain people, like the author, may be ok with two watches, one on each wrist, but it would seem that a majority of the target market will eventually only use one. Which watch will they use? THAT is what watch makers should be worried about. 

    TL;DR The Apple Watch will not compete directly with the watch industry and their customers, it will compete for time on your wrist.

  • sawilsonorg

    iamcalledryan This isn’t significant to the watch industry. For one, it will only work with Apple products, and the vast majority of us don’t even use their products. Secondly, it’s not a watch. It’s some wrist computer shaped like a television from the 70’s. It doesn’t even accept standard watch bands. In short, covering a device that will work with the second place ecosystem barely 10 percent of us use is a waste of time.

  • iamcalledryan

    To your first comment – i think this is their greatest limitation. And I can imagine that version 2 will add more independent functionality to attract new users. But you are missing the point. I am not arguing that in 5 years time everyone will wear an apple watch. I am saying that in 5 years time devices on the wrist in general will be exceptionally common. There will be a boom of new “watch” buyers and some of the old guard (notably entry level quartz watch manufacturers) will be decimated.
    To your second comment, I also sort of agree. Even the 18K Gold version cannot come close to compete with anything I would pick up for a similar price – assuming it will retail for more than $2k. But frankly wheather or not this is a “watch” is irrelevant. It’s great that apple appear to pay a degree of homage to traditional watches, but in the long run this is simply about wrist real estate.
    I fully intend to continue buying mechanical watches. But I love technology. I will be one of those people who buys both products and often wears both at once like a pretentious ass, some will buy only mechanical, but you can be sure the biggest crowd will consist of existing casio/seiko/swatch wearers fully transfering to smart and completely new entrants with no tanlines on their wrist.

  • Jim Bowe

    sawilsonorg Sounds ominously like Steve Ballmer commenting on the introduction of the iPhone….

  • mldelvecchio

    people said the same, exact, thing about the iPod — only works with apple gear, boo! guess who owns the music player market now? yeah, the company that made your music player.

  • eugeneyk

    sawilsonorg Do you even hear yourself talking?

  • mldelvecchio

    apple a Walmart brand? poppycock. they’re the most profitable retailer per square foot, Walmart isn’t. they’re considered a premium brand, Walmart isn’t. they’re labeled affordable-luxury, Walmart isn’t.
    vertu is for rich a-holes, nothing more.

  • sawilsonorg

    Jim Bowe Um, except I’m quoting reality. Look, I know when you are emotionally invested in some company and root for them like they are a sports team, you feel you have to defend them at all costs. Some people have this mental defect where they think if you tell unfortunate truths about something they like, you are saying mean things about THEM. I can’t feel responsible for your bias. So I’d simply ask you to stop attacking me because you don’t like reality. Just try to be a little more mature about these things. You are an adult.

  • sawilsonorg

    mldelvecchio But it didn’t only work with Apple gear. That’s the ENTIRE REASON the iPod was Apple’s first real successful product. It worked with everything.

  • sawilsonorg

    eugeneyk Do you think a childish ad hominem attack is going to score you points? I think you’ve underestimated the intelligence level of your audience.

  • Ulysses31
  • sawilsonorg

    mldelvecchio Apple is a wal=mart brand. I’m sorry. There’s a reason you can’t buy Rolex or Breitling at wal-mart, but you can buy tires for your honda and an iPhone and some malt-liquor. There’s a reason every waitress and bartender has an iPhone. Apple is a wal-mart brand. That’s their target demographic. I’m sorry. I can afford better products than Apple makes. That just makes me fortunate. I hope you are successful one day also.

  • Jim Bowe

    sawilsonorg  Your own words…
    Um, except I’m quoting reality.  Look, I know when you are emotionally invested in some company and root for them like they are a sports team, you feel you have to defend them at all costs. Some people have this mental defect where they think if you tell unfortunate truths about something they like, you are saying mean things about THEM. I can’t feel responsible for your bias. So I’d simply ask you to stop attacking me because you don’t like reality. Just try to be a little more mature about these things. You are an adult. 

    You jump into every single thread in these comments, telling people they are misguided and can’t sees the truth.  I gotta go to work now, and contemplate along with many others, how I could be so wrong about something that isn’t even offered for sale yet.  

    Ariel, thanks for taking the time to describe for us, something we haven’t had the opportunity to see for ourselves.

  • sawilsonorg

    Jim Bowe sawilsonorg I took great offense at you comparing me to Steve Balmer. As anyone should.

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  • StevenRWilson

    sawilsonorg aBlogtoWatch

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  • StevenRWilson

    sawilsonorg blueboompony  I think you should take blueboompony’s advice. Take your Android vs Apple war somewhere else. You do not know how to be respectful of those that do not follow you Android group think. This is a watch lover’s site, and watch lovers do not suffer from “Geek War” disorder.

    You clearly do not fit in here, and your bias and angry rants are not welcome.

  • StevenRWilson

    MarkCarson bdekok I can’t speak to how this lines up with other tech companies, but Apple has a pretty extensive recycling program with their products. If you take them to Apple, they don’t end up in a landfill.

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  • StevenRWilson

    MarkCarsonbdekok Mark, you’d be surprised how much money gets dropped in Apple stores, the typical Apple shopper drops close to $3k, and they are by far the most profitable retail space per square foot, handily beating out #2, Tiffany’s.

  • StevenRWilson

    MarkCarsonTedTbdekok no one knows if Apple watch will be upgradable, but it does have a complete computer encased in resin, so at the minimum it is conceivable that they designed the internals to be future upgradable, at least in-house.

    Expensive watches are often subject to expensive re-tuning and service. The Apple watch requiring the same does not seem that strange to me at all.

    I can’t claim that Apple will design the watch to be upgradable, but it is not completely impossible that they designed it that way. We certainly won’t know until closer to launch.

  • sawilsonorg

    StevenRWilson And I respect your opinion, but I think you are wrong. Now, I’m not going to personally attack you. I’m going to continue to be respectful as I have been. But by all means, please continue to defend a child that attacked everyone in the thread. Because that looks unbiased.

  • iamcalledryan

    I remember looking at the ipad and saying it was the dumbest thing ever – like a giant stupid iphone! And this is my point, it’s not that I am predicting that the iWatch will take over the watch industry; it’s that, like the tablet, Apple is a vehicle for delivering a shift – and wearable wrist-tech is here to stay and will only get more and more awesome. I will die a fan of mechanical watches and I do not think that devices will reduce my collection – they will compliment it.

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  • sawilsonorg

    StevenRWilson It doesn’t matter how much money Apple makes because we are end-users. Not cheerleaders for capitalists. Just like we don’t go to casinos to cheer the blackjack dealer. What matters is Apple doesn’t resonate with the vast majority of us, which is probably why they made a hideous watch, and only their most faithful fans have said anything positive about it. Apple is faith based tech.

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  • StevenRWilson

    sawilsonorg StevenRWilson  my point isn’t that you are wrong about Android or that I am right about Apple, my point is that this simply is not the place to have a Geek Flame War. It’s just wildly inappropriate. It would be like trying to conduct a game of scratch foodball inside of an expensive antique store.

    In a civilized world you simply have to learn normative behavior and adapt to the culture or expectations of the environments you chose to participate in.

    You came in here adopting a very arrogant, and accusatory tone towards the author, who was more than gracious with you, and then proceeded to go on an anti Apple rant. You are just tone deaf to the location you are posting in. The “ad hominem attack” was in my view motivated by your crude and disrespectful behavior.

    The internet is not lacking in places to conduct an Apple vs Android flame war, this is absolutely not that place. Don’t try to bully your way in here and make it into one.

  • StevenRWilson

    Anyone who uses the term “iWatch” is clearly not interested in an intelligent debate and merely wants to start a smear Apple flame war campaign. This is not the place for that.

  • sawilsonorg

    StevenRWilson Do you understand that I haven’t said a single thing about Android?  Hmmm? What is your mental problem with Android? Look, before you act like some nut and start accusing people of things, you’d do well to actually read what they wrote. Otherwise you just look like some crazy person screaming at ghosts. I don’t know what bad things Android did to you. Maybe you are jealous of the fact that it won the smartphone wars, and is the industry standard now and preferred in every demographic. Young, old, rich, poor, Android won. But I didn’t say anything about it.

  • sawilsonorg

    StevenRWilson I guess it’s a good thing your opinion has no value.

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  • Juwon Wee

    @sawilsonorg I think the more correct statement is that this isn’t insignificant to the watch industry. This isn’t Apple’s first foray into a new market(for them) and has thus far proven their naysayers wrong. It tends to be unwise for the entrenched to dismiss a disruptive new player. Of course only time will tell.

  • sawilsonorg

    Juwon Wee I’d agree. But Apple has had some very high profile failures because they lack market share, and don’t lead the industry anymore. iRadio was billed as “watch out spotify!” and died. iBeacons was “watch out NFC payments!” then Apple had to copy Google Wallet because nobody cared about iBeacons. And if this only works with Apple products, it’s already DOA. It’s clear they started developing it to be “just better than” the Samsung Galaxy Gear it copies. They didn’t plan on Android Wear. If they had, it wouldn’t be a hideous square competing against an elegant round Moto 360.

  • sawilsonorg

    iamcalledryan I remember being called a “moron” when I took my iPad to work. “It’s just a big iPhone!” “You can’t even make calls with it!” “It’s like four iphones tapped together lol!”. Some people just hate new tech. The difference is the iPad was remarkable at the time. The Apple Watch is not. There is a better product on the market already, and it isn’t even released yet. You can expect their watch attempt to be completely redone and look a lot more like Android Wear before they release it.

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  • pdanielson

    sawilsonorg With all your money you should be able to afford to hire someone to remove that chip from your shoulder, and still have a couple bucks leftover for some enlargement pills.  Truly wealthy (and classy) people don’t have a need to broadcast it everywhere.  Your insecurity glistens brighter than your Vertu.

  • mattack1

    (previously known as) “Apple Computer”, not “Apple Computers”.

  • pdanielson

    sawilsonorg Do you have a lot of money???  I wish you would tell all of us, since it’s not at all obvious from your comments.  If you do have a lot of money, I’m sure we will all be very impressed with you, and more likely to respect your opinions!

  • pdanielson

    sawilsonorg What kind of plebe would even shop at a Best Buy?  You probably don’t even know how to sail.

  • mbelisario

    sawilsonorg When the iPod first came out it only connected to the Mac. It didn’t get Windows compatibility until the 2nd generation was released in 2002. Source: http://www.everymac.com/systems/apple/ipod/specs/ipod_2ndgen.html and http://www.everymac.com/systems/apple/ipod/specs/ipod.html

  • sawilsonorg

    pdanielson What chip? Because I can afford to be honest about Apple’s products means I have a chip on my shoulder? How does that even work? Do you even know what that means? Watches are expensive because a master designed and created them. I’ll pay 5-15 grand for my favorite watch (Breitling Montbrillant Datora) because it’s worth it. Just like I’ll pay 10 grand for a Vertu phone because it has a REAL sapphire screen, stainless steel body, and hand stitched leather back, while being supremely secure, and getting me VIP seats to all my favorite F1 events (I’m a huge F1 fan). If you are stuck buying Apple’s wal-mart products, I could care less. Are you happy? I’m happy.

  • sawilsonorg

    mbelisario Yes. Which was when it became a success.

  • sawilsonorg

    pdanielson I don’t have “a lot” of money. I do ok. I can afford a nice watch. But I live in the city so I don’t have the expense of a car, or parking, or any of that. I walk everywhere. If I moved, I’d probably sell the nice watch and get an old M5.

  • sawilsonorg

    pdanielson I’d imagine someone trying to get the last of something. I ordered it online. I’ll have the Apple Watch when they finally release it. I review tech on my blog. I’d link it here, but that would be rude. I don’t sail because that’s where sharks live. And I hate boats, and golfing. I like watches and guns and artwork and tech and literature and great plays.

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  • I’m doing something I almost never do here on ABTW.

    Unsubscribe from this thread

    This has devolved into personal attacks and love/hate for Apple the company and at this point there is little discussion about the product (Apple Watch, remember?). This thread clearly is not worth my time to continue reading. I’ll see the regulars in other posts.

  • mbelisario

    sawilsonorg I suppose to be fair, @mldelvecchio didn’t mention a date,  but it’s a bit of a stretch to assume “only works with Apple gear” was meant to cover all of the iPod releases and not just a reference to the initial release. (I guess this means I’m meeting your curmudgeon with my pedant, though. 🙂 )

  • sawilsonorg

    mbelisario Simply put, the products that made/make Apple wealthy work with the biggest ecosystems. If the iPhone only worked with OSX, it would have been a huge failure. As would be the iPad and iPod. because hardly anyone actually uses OSX. Not nearly enough to support a large ecosystem. Now, I’m not saying this to hurt the feelings of any big Apple fan. That’s just reality. The vast majority of us don’t use Apple computers.

  • GregMaletic

    Galvan Given the exceptional utility that a smart watch (such as the Apple Watch) is likely to have in five years, I suspect it will be your “real” watch that is reduced to “toy”, occasional-wear status. In all likelihood, it will simply be too useful not to be wearing one of these.

  • GregMaletic

    sawilsonorg aBlogtoWatch The problem is the Moto 360 is the most desired gadget in the world at the moment

    I, um. I don’t know what to say about this. I’d like to see any evidence to back this statement up.

  • GregMaletic

    You would think all the naysayers would at least tip their hat to the fact that everyone who has underestimated Apple over the past ten years has turned out to be embarrassingly wrong. 

    Of course there’s always a first time…but the likes of Rolex aren’t up to this challenge.

  • sawilsonorg

    GregMaletic I’m basing it on it being sold out everywhere, and any stock anybody gets disappearing in minutes STILL. I can walk down the street right now and pick up an iPhone 6 and be back sitting on my couch in 10 minutes. I still had serious issues even finding a Moto 360 for purchase. They are saying Best Buy might get more in stock.

  • bdekok

    MarkCarson I agree.  Ditto

  • GregMaletic

    sawilsonorg Jim Bowe You’re “quoting reality”, while everyone else is biased?

  • GregMaletic

    sawilsonorg mldelvecchio > the iPod was Apple’s first real successful product.

    > Presumably you’re discounting the Mac, which is the most profitable computer line in the world, and—were I a computer manufacturer—the only personal computer product line actually worth operating.

  • sawilsonorg

    GregMaletic Um, yeah. A line of computers that has never seen better than 10 percent market share. That’s why folks like you, true believers, have to move the goalposts around to pretend Apple is more significant than they are. The reality is that Apple is a tech repackager like Dell. They have no technology of their own. They aren’t giving us the future of space travel like a real innovator (Elon Musk). They aren’t curing sick children. They aren’t feeding the hungry. They are marketing overpriced fashion tech to image conscious people. That’s essentially all they are doing. They don’t make the best anything. They’simply allowed a fast taking marketing genius named Regis McKenna to create the fan fiction that surrounds them, the allows them to take advantage of folks suffering from the Dunning-Kruger effect, and use those folks to spread their gospel and market their perception of quality. It’s a lot cheaper than actually doing quality. When the iPhone 6 Plus’s obvious design flaw became world news, otherwise sane folks immediately jumped on the poor guy unlucky enough to tell folks about it. Grown men acting like children attacking some guy for just telling the truth about a bad product…

    Now, I’ve owned every type of computer over the years. I don’t personally like how cheaply built Apple computers have become. Cheap painted keys that wear off after 8 months of steady use. Untreated aluminum (the new beige) the scratches easily. WIfi issues. Bluetooth issues. Bugs. Sometimes an Apple computer is pure garbage. They use glue now instead of fasteners to save money, and make it easier for their teenage Chinese slave labor to assemble. And I’m sorry. I’m not going to buy a compromise device when I can purchase a carbon fiber masterpiece of a thinkpad with a perfect keyboard that will last for years. Sure, it will cost me more, but that’s because it’s a better product.

    If you are happy using Apple’s substandard products, that’s great. You aren’t alone. 5-7 percent of us have fallen for their very aggressive and manipulative marketing, and are happily paying too much for last year’s tech. But don’t get all high and mighty with me and try to pretend you are some subject matter expert just because I choose to buy higher quality products from more ethical companies.

  • pigseatfigs

    I doubt it will really affect the top end of the watch market, as you mention in your article you plan on wearing both. Anyone with a taste and the means for high end timepieces won’t necessarily choose buying one over the other, Just the occasions to wear each.
     For me, the question is what will anyone do with a $2/5/10,000 watch 1 or 2 years later when the tech has moved on or become defunct? I’m keen to get one, but would like to see a method of updating the components and keeping the watch for a period longer than Apple’s refresh cycle!

     Great article Mr Adams,
    Thanks!

  • I’d say it’s absolutely vital that the watch industry look at Apple’s past disruptions and take note.  Remember what Palm’s CEO said in 2006 about the possibility of the iPhone?  “PC guys are not going to just figure this out. They’re not going to just walk in.”

    Oops.  Four years later, HP was buying Palm, in part to save it from death’s door.  Similar problems hit BlackBerry, Microsoft, Nokia… virtually every leading smartphone company from 2006-2007 had its clock cleaned first by Apple, and later by Google.  They all assumed that a company with a fundamentally different approach could never, ever threaten their dominance; the only way to do it “right” was to conform to the way it had always been done.

    That’s what I see potentially happening here.  Most Swiss manufacturers and traditionalist fans are assuming that Apple stands no chance because it’s not making a conventional watch.  To them, everyone will always prefer mechanical watches, forever.  But here’s the thing: so far, we haven’t seen a tech company build a smartwatch that’s designed to compete with traditional watches in terms of materials and overall quality.  Who’s to say that Apple won’t lure in people who would have otherwise bought a higher-end quartz watch or lower-end Swiss movement watch?  Why are you so certain that smartwatches will never catch on and become luxury items, including among people who otherwise would never have bought a watch in the first place?

    As Hodinkee suggested in its look, there’s a real chance of a generational effect.  Sure, you may associate status with buying some Omega or Rolex that lasts for 20 years, but what about younger adults or your kids?  They may not have the same attachment to established watch brands as you do, but they definitely know about Apple and thrive on technology.  If the Apple Watch is at all good, you may see a legion of people who grow up seeing that (or products like it) as the definition of luxury wristwear.  They may not care that its lifecycle will end in a few years rather than a few decades, or that they have to charge it every night.

    Like others, I don’t think Apple will necessarily threaten the Hublots, Patek Philippes and Jaeger-LeCoultres of the world, at least not in the short term.  However, if most of a watchmaker’s models sell for under $1,000 (especially if they’re significantly under that figure), it should be absolutely terrified and start preparing smartwatches of its own.  As in NOW.  People in that price range aren’t nearly as attached to traditional timepieces as you might think, and the Apple Watch may spark a broader cultural shift that turns smartwatches into status symbols.

  • sawilsonorg

    jonfingas Where does all this Apple fan fiction come from? Seriously? Apple outsold Android for exactly ONE MONTH. That’s it. Go check. One month Apple had 11 percent marketshare of phones and Android had like 2, the next month Android passed Apple and never stopped climbing. I wouldn’t want to interrupt the time honored tradition of pretending Apple did things they didn’t do, but it’s getting kinda ridiculous.

  • GaranceD

    sawilsonorg – It’s nice for me to be in a discussion where Apple is viewed as “a Walmart brand”.  In most computer discussions Apple is accused of being the absurdly over-priced brand.  🙂
    I’m not sure why anyone has a strong opinion of this right now, given that the watch Apple ships in 4-6 months will not be the same thing that they showed off *PARTIALLY* at their event.  If they thought they were completely done with the watch, they would have released it right now (or at least before Christmas), and not waited longer.

    In any case, given the price of the higher-end watches you may very well be correct that Apple is “the walmart brand” compared to Rolex or Breitling.  However, this product category could still be very successful for them, even if it doesn’t sell to the people who are currently buying those higher-end watches.  Apple doesn’t need to put Rolex out of business, their biggest success will be if they can sell this new watch to the people who currently do not buy any watches at all.  I work at a college, and from what I can tell the number of people who don’t wear any watch is a much much bigger market than the group of people who buy Rolex watches.

  • sawilsonorg

    GaranceD If Apple has a hope in hell of making this product work, they need to do two things: 

    1) copy Android Wear. This shouldn’t be a problem for Apple. They’ve been copying Android features for iOS for four years. Android Wear is a lot more intelligent than Apple’s attempt because it stays out of your way.  

    2) Make their watch work with Android. Android has 87 percent of the smartphone market now. That’s not a typo. 

    Apple fans will forgive an ugly Apple product. Apple will just tell them it’s not ugly, and they’ll believe it. They won’t forgive a poorly executed product, or a product they can’t use with the windows machines the vast majority of us use still.

  • MarkCarson Indeed, signing off too.

  • whtipster1908

    It feels like some aspects of this watch are fantastic, and a true extension of what many would want from a watch, and some are just downright puzzling. In fact, the aspect of this watch I hate the most is the screen, while many of the other features seem truly great to me. I love the idea that if I’m in the middle of a conversation where I don’t want to seem distracted, I can set up a personalized “tap” that tells me my wife is the one calling me instead of some idiotic robo-dialer. I have a very strict policy of not taking phone calls while I’m interacting in real life because I don’t believe it is polite to even check to see who is calling. My family understands but it means 3 phone calls in a row so I know it’s them. By that point I know it is important enough to interrupt conversation. And for my wife to send me a small tap just before I’m about to do something like lead an important meeting without sending a text that I have to look at my phone to see? I can see value in that, or at the very least I can see it connecting me with those I love rather than turning into one more distraction.. 
    As for this idea that somehow people are going to be able to “inconspicuously” check texts and the like on their wrist while doing something else? Get real. This was the promise with cell phones too, but now those are apparently too conspicuous because we all have them. The genius of Apple promoting the heck out of this feature is that we all get it – you’re looking at your wrist not to check the time, but to see if something else in your life, twitter feed, etc is more interesting than we are. And we will definitely know that you are doing it, if this article is correct in stating that the screen will be blank unless your wrist motion cues alert the watch to the fact that you want to see something on it. The whole point of a watch to me (from the perspective of telling time) is that I can glance at my wrist without moving any other part of my body and see the time, or even just figure out whether 5, 10, or 15 minutes have passed since I last checked. 
    In the end, Apple should know as well as anyone how difficult it is to convince people to carry a second piece of technology on them. They put great cameras on the iphone and helped put the point and shoot industry out of business. I’ll take the other side of your argument that phones on the wrist is inevitable and say that humans are willing to put up with carrying a smartphone because it offers enough benefit to justify the hassle. But we aren’t willing to let a connected piece of technology intrude in a place that is not always easily hidden.

  • sawilsonorg jonfingas You do realize that statement is easily proven false, right?

    Android launched with the T-Mobile G1 in October 2008.  Here’s Gartner’s stats for smartphone market share for both Q4 2008 (when Android first arrived) and that entire year:

    http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/910112

    “Mac OS X” (i.e. the iPhone) had 10.7 percent of the smartphone market in Q4 2008.  Every Linux-based smartphone platform on the planet, of which Android was only a minority at the time, amounted to 8.4 percent.  And here’s what the market looked like a year later, in Q4 2009:

    http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/1306513

    iPhone at 14.4 percent, Android at 3.9 percent.  

    Sorry, but you’re the one creating revisionist history in this case.  I was following the industry closely at that time — Android struggled through its first year because there were hardly any devices, and those that existed (mostly from HTC and Samsung) were no threat to the iPhone.  It wasn’t until the Motorola Droid (late 2009) and Samsung Galaxy S (mid-2010) that Android started posing a real challenge to Apple.

    We’re not in a directly comparable situation with the Apple Watch, since Google already has its platform out there and there are no other comparable platforms on the horizon (Pebble is fine, but it’s much simpler).  However, I think we’re still at a turning point like we saw with smartphones in 2007, or MP3 players in 2001.  While the smartwatch category exists, what’s out there isn’t necessarily compelling: most of it is very obviously designed by geeks, for geeks, with virtually no consideration for fashion.  I’m not saying that Apple has nailed it (this early design is certainly thick), but it’s the first major manufacturer to take a sincere stab at making a smartwatch that appeals to a broad audience.

  • sawilsonorg

    gronosliwas The Vertu is like a tuxedo device. I literally only use it to get into VIP events. Otherwise I LOVE Sony phones. Waterproof. Best in class construction. Right now I have the Z1C, and I’m not even sure if I’m going to bother upgrading to the Z3C because I don’t really have any complaints. THREE DAYS of battery with my modified stamina mode that only checks work email when the screen is off. That’s almost Nokia brick battery life. I wish everybody made phones as good as Sony.

  • sawilsonorg

    jonfingas Ok, now try anybody but Gartner. Go on. Oh, try three other people. Unless you just like cherry picking data that supports the conclusion you want to reach. I’ll wait.

  • sawilsonorg

    whtipster1908 Here’s what kills me. Apple is expecting you to use the corner of your pinky to poke at 1/10th size icons for apps on a tiny watch screen. That’s so braindead it’s almost funny. It’s like they got struck by a stupid ray on the day they finalized the UI. It is one of, if not the worst UI design I’ve ever seen in my life.

  • sawilsonorg jonfingas

    IDC had Apple at 16.2 percent of the smartphone market in Q4 2009; Strategy Analytics had Apple at 16.4 percent.  There aren’t other major worldwide analyst estimates from that period (Kantar didn’t start publishing in earnest until 2012), but ComScore had Apple’s December 2009 market share in the US at 25.3 percent versus Android’s 5.2.

    http://www.idc.com/about/viewpressrelease.jsp?containerId=prUS22689111

    http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20100131005063/en/Strategy-Analytics-Global-Smartphone-Shipments-Jump-30#.VCt4uildXKc

    http://www.comscore.com/Insights/Press-Releases/2010/2/comScore-Reports-December-2009-U.S.-Mobile-Subscriber-Market-Share

    Look, I know you want to cling to the notion that Android immediately took the phone market by storm and left the iPhone in the dust, but that is objectively, demonstrably untrue. Let it go. If you’re going to argue that the Apple Watch is destined to fail, you’re going to need a much better argument than “because I hate Apple.”

  • bdekok

    sawilsonorg whtipster1908 Seriously, you must be a troll.  You’re here 24/7 always providing a hateful response.  Do you have a job?  It doesn’t look like it as you focus unbelievable attention at this blog.

    I’m thinking you must live in a basement, and if you do have a job, it must be that you’re paid to do this.  Looking at some of your comments here and one can paint a rather unpleasant profile of you.  That is:

    You don’t drive a car
    You hate boats and stay away from water as it contains sharks
    You hate golf
    Do you hate fresh air???
    You LOVE guns  … I’m not going to comment on that point.

    I guess I’ve made a mistake here as I’ve responded to you.

    EVERYBODY PLEASE NOTE
    ——————————
    Don’t feed the troll.  Do not respond to him henceforth.  He is a blight on this forum.

    My apologise for this nasty response.  The hate he’s spewing is really boiling my blood.

  • sawilsonorg

    jonfingas Oh God, I owe you an apology. I said month and meant quarter. Please accept my apology.

  • sawilsonorg

    bdekok I don’t think you should be making all these personal attacks against me. It’s unwarranted and rude. You should walk away from the computer until you learn how to talk to people.

  • sawilsonorg

    gronosliwas sawilsonorg Why is it that people that suddenly find out that Apple didn’t invent everything think that I’m the one that’s mad? Maybe you should take your own advice. I’m perfectly content. I’m happy even. You seen quite irritated.

  • sawilsonorg jonfingas No problem.  That said, those are Q4 2009 stats, a year after Android came out.  Generally speaking, it took several quarters before Android overtook iOS in the smartphone market.  That was quick, but definitely not overnight.

  • sawilsonorg

    jonfingas No worries. You did a good job making your point.

  • bdekok

    sawilsonorg bdekok For anyone interested.  Scott Wilson has his own blog at blog.sawilson.org, if your interested in seeing the level of his hate on anything Apple; it’s an interesting if disturbing read.  He’s quite loud about it.  He even caused someone to create a tumbler page dedicated to him called “Stupid Apple Haters’ located at http://duckwithnukes.tumblr.com/post/43869675738/when-apple-decided-to-make-their-lg-prada-copy.  … amusing.

    A simple search for sawilsonorg will show that scott has been prolific on many, many TECH sites, much to the chagrin of many other followers of those sites.  He is mainly known for his strong hate for all things Apple and he’s almost religious fervour for pushing all things Android.

    Nothing wrong with pushing Android, but not at the hateful expense of all else.

    Please Scott.  If you can’t stick to just discussing watches, leave this site and go back to the tech sites that are more tolerant of the socially maligned misfits, geeks and fanboys.

  • sawilsonorg

    gronosliwas So are you feeling better then? You ok to continue? Take all the time you need. None of this is really that important.

  • sawilsonorg

    bdekok You have serious anger issues. I”d hate to have to report you for baseless attacks. Again, you should probably just stop attacking me for my opinions, and take a break from your computer for a while. Nobody cares about your weird little vendetta against me. No good will come from it.

  • sawilsonorg

    gronosliwas It’s a love hate thing. See, I was always obsessed with accuracy. I got ruined early on by this brand few folks have heard of called Orient. I had an uncle give me an Orient Star as a gift for becoming an eagle scout. I swear to God, it loses only 2-5 second a month. So that gave me very unrealistic expectations for how accurate a “real” watch should be. So with something so complicated as a datora, it might lose 2 seconds one day, or gain 2 another day, but lose full minutes by the end of a month. But to me, there’s nothing more beautiful than a stainless steel datora with a blue face. However…. there’s a VERY hard to find Orient that I love also, which is model number CET08002d that I’ve been trying to find forever. I almost had one shipped from Hong Kong, but I got taken for a ride. Thankfully I was able to reverse charges. My favorite watches are perpetual calendar, and anything with a slide rule.

  • bdekok

    sawilsonorg bdekok LOL.  Golden rule in negotiations.  Never threaten.  Do or do not.  

    Interesting how you never directly answered any of my allegations or opinions of you.  This suggests acceptance of fact.

    Bye…

  • sawilsonorg

    bdekok Ok, yeah. Later.

  • sawilsonorg

    gronosliwas Love you

  • What a wonderful, fascinating, thoughtful article! Let’s hope not only watch enthusiasts recognize the quality of your analysis, but that Apple bloggers and tech-news journalists will appreciate it too — because this is hands down the most valuable review of the Apple Watch to date.

  • Lurch

    Why are you removing/filtering comments?  I noticed this on your Rolex article and this one.  Must be Ariel has a minority interest in Apple and Rolex.

  • Corvaxus

    sawilsonorg 

    I see http://www.livefyre.com/profile/53878894/’s point about you. Your extreme bias is obvious, but like everyone else it’s just one man’s “opinion” isn’t it…

  • sawilsonorg

    Corvaxus Meh, I have people that adore me and people that don’t like what I have to say. The reality is i’m pro consumer. I’ve given Google plenty of hell and Apple plenty of praise. People see what they want to see.

    http://blog.sawilson.org/2014/07/prediction-apple-is-going-to-obliterate.html

    http://blog.sawilson.org/2013/11/delivery-what-google-sucks-at.html

    and this one is just me having fun:

    http://blog.sawilson.org/2013/12/everyone-has-plan-until-they-get.html

    Enjoy

  • Lurch That would be pretty impressive to have an interest in Apple or Rolex. Would probably make my life a lot more relaxed. To answer your question we don’t remove comments ever unless they are patently SPAM – which happens regularly. Our commenting system (LiveFyre) attempts to auto-detect SPAM and sometimes there are false positives so our team has to manually moderate comments from time to time. If it ever appears that a comment doesn’t get immediately posted it is because the system is “looking at it.” We agree it isn’t always ideal, but it is something we are actively looking to improve if a better commenting system becomes available. I just looked in the system, and your comment on the Rolex article is alive and well.

  • @iedsri That is very nice of you to say. Thanks for the comment.

  • sawilsonorg

    GregMaletic Well…. We said iOS would get obliterated by Android, and people kept saying “iOS is coming back!” then Android kept gaining more and more marketshare, then Apple lost the smartphone wars. Then they lost the tablet market. Then they lost so much market share they had to start copying Samsung. So, that’s what actually happened. Now they don’t have enough market share to effect the market anymore. They’ll be waiting to see what Google and Samsung do. That’s why they copied the Galaxy Gear for their watch. So, I’m not sure what market you are watching, but that’s what actually happened.

  • galavanter

    A great watch blog and a great review of my next watch. With THAT band. All they need to do now is get Bond to wear it in his next film.

  • sawilsonorg

    ReneStein You can simply look at Asurion’s figures for what kind of phone they end up doing replacements for the most. I believe the iPhone makes up about 70 percent of the broken phones they see.

  • sawilsonorg

    I want to post a link to something. Then as watch fanatics, I want your honest opinion. I love watches. I love what I’m about to link.

    https://plus.google.com/communities/100528130097464336279

    Those are the many many watch faces of the Moto 360. That’s what has true watch geeks (like myself) so excited. Micky Mouse. Official Breitling faces. Rolex faces. Gosh, old Elgin faces. Art Deco designs. Brand new designs. You can make your pretty round watch look like anything you can imagine. Check out this subreddit:

    http://www.reddit.com/r/androidwatchfaces/related/2hu05q/watch_face_moto_360_clean_analog_watch_face_with/

    That’s what has true watch nuts flipping out. The greatest designers in the world are making these.

  • StevenRWilson

    sawilsonorg mbelisario  you lump the iPad in as a failure? It does not have the sales numbers of the iPhonebut it is hardly a failure. It is by far the most successful tablet computer and has defined the entire tablet space, just like the iPhone defined the smartphone space.

    I get that you hate Apple and are completely unable to be objective about them, I was the same way about Microsoft about 10 years ago. My guess is you work in IT, which is filled with Apple hating people.  have known many in IT that wish that Apple had never existed or had gone out of business in the 90s.

    Not having the largest market share in a market does not make something a “failure”. Not being profitable, not being able to grow as a business, ending up like Kodak or even Motorolla before it was bought out by Google could be considered failing. Android is filled with barely profitable or completely unprofitable players. Outside of Samsung there are no companies making significant profits off of Android. Google will likely never make back their investment and in fact makes more off of iOS than Android.

    Regardless, talking to you about this seems like explaining how delicious sushi is to someone who is allergic to sea food. 

    I have a sense if Apple developed a cure for cancer and you were on your deathbed with cancer in 6 parts of your body, you’d prefer death over the Apple cure.

  • StevenRWilson

    sawilsonorg GregMaletic “Um, yeah. A line of computers that has never seen better than 10 percent market share. That’s why folks like you, true believers, have to move the goalposts around to pretend Apple is more significant than they are. ”

    That’s more evidence of your irrational anti-Apple bias and screams of IT Apple hater. You clearly don’t run a business. No business cares about market share for an unprofitable line of business unless it drives profits and revenues someplace else

    It was clearly stated, and you chose to completely ignore that Apple’s computer line is the only significantly profitable line of computers in the world. .IBM got out of the business entirely a few years ago, Dell went private hanging on to razor thin profits, HP has rattled about getting out of the computer space, Chinese manufacturers have clawed each other to death over scraps.

    You do not have to be an “Apple faithful” to make objective judgements on profits and business strategies. You do not have to like Apple at all to see that their strategy is profitable and successful from a business standpoint.

    But you do have to be a mindless geek zealot to ignore all these things and continually rant on a non geek blog about how terrible Apple is. You are not contributing meaningfully to the dialogue here and your rhetoric or tone are not improving. I would hope since you do not seem to wish to respect the culture here that you move on and find another place to spout off about how terrible Apple is and how much you hate it.

  • SureshPenumatsa

    A wonderful article which actually goes in depth about the upcoming Apple Watch. Well written and to the point. I guess reading your article makes me a bit more interested in the upcoming watch. Thank you.

  • Ulysses31

    MarkCarson Before I even saw your comment I was considering the same.  If my “crying Frenchman” can’t even draw attention to the futility of conflict, then nothing will.  This is all just too much crap to read now.

  • Borys Bozzor Pawliw

    StevenRWilson sawilsonorg mbelisario Absolutely hearing you on large market share but 0 margins: I see it in point and shoot cameras, flat panels TVs, much of the logistics sector and so much of IT hardware, Apple has succeeded because it has managed to get people to pay a premium for a unique hardware and software combination that people enjoy / trust / desire. What’s the point of 65% market share if you are pocketing scraps? Apple has the money in the bank to prove what success is all about.

  • oroloi

    Are you for real ?

  • sawilsonorg

    oroloi I’m actually a character from a gripping WB series.

  • oroloi

    What a fantastic article, thanks Ariel. I am really excited about the Apple Watch and can’t wait to get it 🙂
    Everything you say is the way I see it as well. I knew Apple would get it right, it’s going to be a long wait but worth waiting

  • sawilsonorg

    StevenRWilson The truest sense of desperation is having to make up arguments for me. Well, don’t let me stop you. Please go ahead and argue the rest of the things you’ve made up for me to say. It should be highly entertaining. But I’m requesting you throw in some dragons or ninjas or something because so far this is a dull read.

  • sawilsonorg

    StevenRWilson I’ve run three successful businesses. That being said, it hardly matters. I’m expressing my opinions as an end-user and subject matter expert with 30 years of experience. And profits only matter to fanboys and stock holders, of which you are the former. I’ve been an actual stock holder, so I have every right to be critical of Apple. To be Apple Faithful means to defend every dumb thing they do, then later when it is proven it was dumb, like say Apple Maps, you pretend you were never on their side. I know sunny day supporters such as yourself. I bet you were telling everybody how Apple Maps was fine up until Tim had to publicly humiliate Apple by apologizing. Ask Jennifer Lawrence how much she likes Apple right now. 

    The point is you don’t have to be a bleating sheep about tech. It’s just tech. It’s not magic no matter what nonsense Apple would have you believe. Apple isn’t special. They are a company brewing a particularly strong flavor of kool-aid and you have apparently had more than your fill.

  • Lurch

    aBlogtoWatch Lurch  Thanks Ariel.  That is reassuring and perhaps explains why I have seen more critical comments disappear due to SPAM auto-detection..  I enjoy reading all comments, critical or favorable.

  • I long for the kind of careful analysis of the technology sector (particularly Apple) that you give to watch design and the watch industry. It’s generally not at this level at all. By the way, I came to your blog from the Apple side, though I do own a few classics (a Planet Ocean, a Time Walker and a Fortis Alarm among them). I have to confess, however, that I may be one of those buyers you’ve described who will have to give up the “real” watches for the “virtual” one (I think Freud says this will require “decathexis” and “transference” 🙂 — and it will be Apple’s fault!

  • thornwood36

    Crazy amount of comments for small computer for your wrist : )

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  • komocode

    Apple did call their iPhone 4 a smartphone.

  • Floyd1987

    aBlogtoWatch – Just thought i would pop over after listening to the Hourtime PodCast.

    Ariel – Love the work your doing as always. – Made me laugh quite a bit!

    All the best,

    F

  • iamcalledryan

    Yes I enjoyed John’s handling of the incredible amount of whining that has been going down here!

  • sawilsonorg

    oroloi They might eventually.

  • sawilsonorg
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  • iamcalledryan

    looks fun, but I would rather buy the real thing or have a display on a wrist-computer that is not trying to look analog. If you think of the potential of wrist-computers in the future, mimicking expensive mechanical watches is a drop in the ocean albeit a fun idea. It is clear that you are passionate about the Moto360’s ability to act as a more universal watch template, and on that front it does indeed trump the apple watch. But bottom line is I have yet to see anyone wearing one; perhaps it is down to my geography and demographic but I look around me on the train in the morning and 9/10 people are on apple devices. There are a lot of shoddy watches on these people too. It’s not hard to predict that during 2015 many of these people will have apple watches on. Again, nothing to do with genuine merit or functionality, just a fact. Tune back into this thread in 12 months time and if I am wrong that the apple watch did not bring a vastly larger segment into the market vs the moto 360, and start what is becoming a revolution I will eat my hat and send you the clip.

  • bigsam2035

    Thanks for this article Ariel. As you may have noticed, you
    have a disparate group of readers reading your blog for widely different
    reasons. Some do seem to have very strong opinions on what you should write
    though. That is okay, it is just an opinion amongst many others – many silent
    others.. But it is your blog and we do enjoy the different perspectives you and
    your fellow writers provide – whether it is about the visit to a particular
    Manufacture, or that the important real estate on a wrist may find a new type
    of ‘time piece”, depending on the wearers work, mood, pocket, or time of
    day. Keep up the good work.

  • sawilsonorg

    iamcalledryan It trumps Apple’s watch in most measurable ways. You clearly don’t know much about Android Wear. You should probably do some research before making predictions with no basis in reality. 87 percent of us use Android. As the lead technical entity in a large corporation in the very trendy and expensive west end of washington DC, I can tell you that Android surpassed iOS in the corporate world about 14 months ago. Right now iPhones make up about 36 percent of our mobile devices.

  • iamcalledryan

    ok sounds great. I must be in a niche demographic – that’s the basis of my reality, not market analysis so perhaps you are right; I don’t mind if motorolla win the race, I just still think apple will lead it – sorry

  • sawilsonorg

    iamcalledryan There are a lot of those types of markets, especially for Apple. NYC and SanFran are almost entirely iOS. The rest of the world is not. In major cities you’ll walk into a company and everyone in marketing has an iPhone, but nobody else. It has to do with who is more likely to be celebrity or image obsessed at this point.

  • iamcalledryan

    Well you guessed it – I commute to Manhattan

  • sawilsonorg

    iamcalledryan I call it “iphone club”. There’s nothing negative or wrong about it. It’s actually quite enviable from a marketing position. Everybody wants that fanatical userbase or bastion.

  • iamcalledryan

    Oh, and you are being rather condescending to assume that just because you view andriod to be superior that it could only be image/celebrity that leads people to choose apple. That may count for a lot of them, but I would steer away from those sorts of generalizations – I think that is what is getting people’s backs up in here.

  • sawilsonorg

    iamcalledryan I’m basing it on the fact that Apple very brilliantly started giving every TV show and Movie and celebrity free devices over 14 years ago. It creates that perception that Apple has marketshare. And folks that believe everything they see on TV, or hop on twitter so they can pretend they are just like the celebrities they follow eat this type of marketing up. The typical Apple user likes things like Jersey Shore and Keeping Up With The Kardashians. That’s Apple’s core demographic. I wasn’t trying to be condescending. Just stating a market reality.

  • iamcalledryan

    The typical apple user likes things like Jersey Shore. Again a total generalization that I challenge you to support with evidence. I am an apple user and I hate celebrity culture, have never watched J Shore, and am not an imbecile. And product placement is not evidence of consumer choice – it is a lame effort to steer it.

  • sawilsonorg

    iamcalledryan We are both making generalizations. Don’t let the irony of that escape you.

  • iamcalledryan

    I ws taking an observable fact (my commute) and extrapolating. You are putting an enourmous consumer base into a derogatory bucket.

  • sawilsonorg

    iamcalledryan You are making the bucket derogatory. I’m not. There is absolutely nothing wrong with owning things for status and having zero idea how they work. That’s most of us. Non-technical folks get to participate too, even if they are a shrinking demographic, they have a company making products for them. I own a Vertu Constellation. It’s not only because I use their VIP service extensively so it ends up being a bargain. I do enjoy showing it off. Just like I enjoy showing off an expensive watch, or wearing an expensive suit, or pair of shoes. Apple allows people to get that feeling for a lot less money. There’s value in that.

  • GregMaletic

    > Typical Apple user likes “jersey shore”
    Okay wow you just blew my mind.

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  • andrekibbe

    komocode I believe that was the first time Apple referred to the iPhone as a smartphone—four generations in. Similarly, I don’t think they ever mentioned the word “tablet” in iPad presentations and marketing until the iPad 3, and then only in reference to market share. And they’ve never referred to the iPod as an MP3 player.

  • sawilsonorg

    GregMaletic Have you SEEN Apple’s userbase? Their customers are the folks obsessed with celebrity because that’s 90 percent of Apple’s marketing. So huge surprise, their primary demographic is exactly who they market to.

  • GregMaletic

    sawilsonorg I’d characterize Apple’s user base as people willing to spend an extra buck to get stuff that 1) works simply and reliably, and 2) looks good. “Celebrity-obsessed” is taking it a few steps too far, I think.

  • sawilsonorg

    GregMaletic I’m sure that’s how they see it. They aren’t considering that they just saw three movies and 25 tv shows that subliminally planted the suggestion in their head that “rich people” prefer Apple products.

  • iamcalledryan

    Please share with us a recent breakdown of Apple’s total marketing spend, as well as a split of their total revenue by demographic; ideally also contrasting that of Motorolla’s; otherwise I will be forced to conclude that you are in fact a talking out of your rear. Seriously, this thread is a disaster; a genuine peice of commentary based on a highly anticipated product has devolved into a complete distraction; I’ll check back in if you have provided the above otherwise I am out of here and will be sure to post a pic of my aplle watch, complete with a JLC Reverso face on it (about the only one I can choose from) when I get it.

  • sawilsonorg

    iamcalledryan No. Why would I? If you are trying to make a point, try getting to it and drop the theatrics. Lets not pretend you are in a position to tell people what to do. You might start getting an inflated opinion of yourself.

  • iamcalledryan

    I am not telling you what to do – if I had that power I would tell you to go away. I am challenging you to support the absurd comments you have made about Apple customers.

  • sawilsonorg

    iamcalledryan You are not crippled. You can go use Google. I’m not your PA.

  • iamcalledryan

    Well I checked the apple invsetor relations website and scanned a couple of their 10ks and Quarterlies. Also did a quick run on Google. From what I can see Apple does not share any breakdowns of their customer demography. It also looks like they typically get free product placement, which supports part of your theory – ie they do use product placement. but the billion or so dollars that they spend on the full spectrum of advertising suggests that you have made a pretty limited assumption that their product placement has driven a customer base of predominantly ill-informed, celebrity obsessed, watchers of god-awful TV.

  • sawilsonorg

    iamcalledryan Imagine that. So I was right.

  • iamcalledryan

    Well you were right that they, like motorolla, use product placement where they can. It’s just everything that you applied that fact to that is wrong.

  • Metascover

    sawilsonorg iamcalledryan What are you talking about? More and more iOS devices are sold every year, so you can’t say “at this point”.

  • MehNitesh

    ” None of these devices use Gorilla Glass like other Apple products, and they are said to be designed with “impact” in mind. ”  
    I suspect they do, they just don’t say it to sound more fancy. Ion strengthened glass. Do you know the process Gorilla Glass 3 uses? Ion strengthening.

  • sawilsonorg

    iamcalledryan No, you’ve shown that I was right and that Apple give away free laptops and phones to tv shows and movies and any a or b list celebrity. That’s them essentially paying for product placement to create the illusion of the marketshare they’ve never actually had. That’s reality. “Here, free stuff”. Swag. And that marketing works on the easily impressionable and the image obsessed.

  • sawilsonorg

    Metascover That metric is meaningless. The market is growing very rapidly, and Apple continues to lose marketshare. Selling an extra few million devices a year means nothing when 200 million new users are added. It means Apple fails to capture anything but a few percent of new users.

  • sawilsonorg

    MehNitesh Remember when Apple was going to use Sapphire glass, then they did a bait and switch, but still want a thousand dollars for a 500 dollar phone that bends like a stick of bubblegum?

  • iamcalledryan

    Android companies (at least those whose products aren’t a total bomb) also use product placement; ergo moto360 wearers are image obsessed.
    Look I don’t profess to being a tech-wiz; but I work in the periphery of the watch industry, and have a good knowledge of that industry. All I have been trying to say is, and I have it from at least two reliable sources, that it is only now, only with this watch, that the Swiss watch industry is in panic mode in the boardroom. Other wearable tech up till now has been well and truly ignored. That is one of the very legitimate reasons for ABTW to cover this product.

  • sawilsonorg

    iamcalledryan Again, I’ve already stated there’s nothing wrong with it. It’s an amazing demographic Apple has. Poor college students willing to spend their financial assistance checks on Apple products so they can be “cool” like KimK and Snooky. Who wouldn’t want trendy money? Samsung surely took notice and started doing the same thing. Sure enough, boom massive amounts of sales by putting their crap all over WB shows. Microsoft did the same thing by putting their Surface products all over shows like 90210 and Gossip Girl. Vacuous people eat that type of marketing up. And Apple is now losing those people. Ellen is pushing Samsung. That had a HUGE effect in the LGBT community, which was traditionally an Apple stronghold. And I’m sorry that type of marketing works so well, but it does. That’s your Apple userbase. Folks that love twitter and facebook and pumpkin spice latte’s, and reading about what Jimmy Fallon said about Justin Timberlake. That whole fake fame celebrity obsessed “iPhone Club”. That’s Apple’s demographic. And the people that want to pretend they are cool like the 20 somethings. “I’ll get an iPhone like those young kids have and they won’t notice my hair transplant!”. It’s a brilliant marketing model.

  • sawilsonorg

    iamcalledryan I don’t think any serious maker is afraid of Apple’s hideous watch. The kind of people that are going to buy Apple’s galaxy gear copy aren’t watch people. I’m a watch guy. I’m not interested in that ugly thing. And honestly, Apple doesn’t have enough market share to disrupt any industry anymore. That’s why they are copying Samsung and Google now. They have no choice. They had to make smaller tablets, bigger phones, and a wearable. When Apple gets an original idea again, that’s when some industry has to be worried. But with iRadio failing so badly, and Apple failing so bad in China, and iBeacons failing, and their stock being downgraded to a “hold”, I don’t think anybody is really worried about them.

  • iamcalledryan

    Again, in the absence of any factual evidence to support this, I’m afraid it says more about you than the millions of people using apple products for millions of reasons.

  • iamcalledryan

    You don’t think that, but I am telling you they are. When I heard about this product I consulted two colleagues; one is a Chariman of a brand, the other a dealer; it was their knowledgeable insight that confirmed to be that this is now a hot topic in the industry.

  • GregMaletic

    sawilsonorg Metascover I’m not sure why you’re acting like market share matters. It only matters to the degree that 1) the ecosystem around the product is sustained, and 2) it leads to profits. Apple is already collecting virtually all of the industry’s profits, and the ecosystem around the iPhone is first by a mile, and that lead is increasing. Share in the mobile market is not a statistic that lets you draw any interesting—or true—conclusions.

  • sawilsonorg

    iamcalledryan It’s neither. The prices climbed so high for premium watches because the market shrank. The kind of people that would even wear a 20,000 dollar watch aren’t going to be impressed with in a dork wrist computer. It’s a different generation of person. I’ve been watching the Moto 360 sell out everywhere in minutes the second it’s available. The people buying it aren’t traditional watch people. Right now it’s “nerdy types” like me that love new tech. But it’s catching on, and “normal folk” are buying them also. Not in huge numbers yet. But it’s a beautiful device. I like mine a lot. But it has flaws, and I’m going to be very critical about those after I’ve had a solid week with the device. And it’s awesome. But this isn’t going to replace a Breiting or a Rolex or an IWC.

  • sawilsonorg

    GregMaletic I’m not sure why you are pretending marketshare doesn’t matter. You can’t control markets without it. Apple not having market share is why they are the followers, and Google and Samsung are the leaders.

  • GregMaletic

    sawilsonorg iamcalledryan > The kind of people that would even wear a 20,000 dollar watch aren’t going to be impressed with in a dork wrist computer.

    It’s not about being “impressed”. If the Apple Watch is useful, they’ll give up their $20,000 watch simply for a dork wrist computer, happily. And if it’s not useful, then nobody at all will do that.

  • sawilsonorg

    GregMaletic No, they won’t. Not in it’s current incarnation. The UI is braindead. Apple expects you to poke at little icons with the corner of your pinky! That’s beyond stupid. Nobody cares about this ugly hunk of nonsense from Apple. I see LOTS Of paid marketing right now, but I see very Apple biased Jon Stewart picking on this device on The Daily Show. That’s reality.

  • GregMaletic

    sawilsonorg GregMaletic “Controlling markets” matters only in the pursuit of profits. If you “control a market”, as you say Google and Samsung do, but yet make no money doing so, what is the point?

  • GregMaletic

    sawilsonorg GregMaletic Nobody’s opinion matters until they’ve used it. The guy who wrote this article used it, and was impressed. So until I lay my hands on one, I’m going with his opinion.

  • sawilsonorg

    GregMaletic Profits only matter to fanboys and stock holders. And your childish nonsense about Google and Samsung not making money? You do realize that Google will be passing Apple for most profitable publicly traded company in the world this year right? And you realize that Samsung only documents about 7 percent of their actual income to avoid taxes. Samsung in total, all 90 companies is worth about ten times what Apple is. I’m not even sure where your delusion sprung from. I haven’t even seen this one before.

  • GregMaletic

    sawilsonorg > Profits only matter to fanboys and stock holders.

    So you’re saying that Samsung isn’t in this business to make profits?

    For the past several years, Apple has collected 60% of the profits in the mobile phone industry; in the recent quarter it was over 70%.

    http://www.asymco.com/2014/03/18/invaluable/

  • sawilsonorg

    GregMaletic Just stop right there. Asymco is that idiot that got caught forging numbers for Apple twice. He’s a paid shill. I mean come on. If you are going to continue with this nonsense Apple fan fiction, and this delusion that Apple matters and is still relevant, you will have to to do better than paid shills.

  • GregMaletic

    sawilsonorg > He’s a paid shill.

    Where did you read this?

  • sawilsonorg

    GregMaletic He got busted recently. He’s a huge Apple stock holder. He tried to claim that Apple make something like 60 percent of PC sales profits by completely omitting the PC Gaming market, which is 70 percent of overall profits. He’s a con artist.

  • GregMaletic

    sawilsonorg Again, I’d have to see a reference to believe this.

  • sawilsonorg

    GregMaletic ok

    http://www.cultofmac.com/255618/how-apples-blacklist-manipulates-the-press/

    http://9to5mac.com/2014/08/29/seeing-through-the-illusion-understanding-apples-mastery-of-the-media/

    Apple is a construct. It’s like, a blueprint for guerilla marketing tactics. They were an invention of Regis KcKenna. He basically applied the fashion industry model to a tech company. That’s why Apple Stores look like Hot Topic. They completely lifted the aesthetic. The idea is to convince you that you look and feel better if you use their products, and convince you that any shortcomings are YOU being wrong. Again, brilliant marketing. Using fear of not being accepted and the promise of acceptance as a business model for fashion tech. But they have to keep the lies going. So they’ll hire an Anandtech to write a puff piece about a pointless 64 bit processor, and they’ll threaten a site with blacklisting if they mention how bad the resolution is on the iPad Mini, or how washed out the colors are on an iPad AIr. And it’s not just Apple. DisplayMate was generally VERY respected, until someone noticed that they kept stumping for Samsung. So people started doing their own tests, and figured out they are simply lying to people about the quality of Samsung displays. Billions of dollars on the line. Every journalist a stock holder trying to boost the value of their stock. Zero ethics.

  • GregMaletic

    sawilsonorg None of the things mentioned in those article is that surprising. All companies engage in these policies. And neither article mentions Asymco.

    > that’s why Apple Stores look like Hot Topic

    Am I missing something? 

    http://images.taubman.com/www.shopnorthlake.com/asset/get/10109

  • sawilsonorg

    GregMaletic There’s no way you read those two articles already, so now we know you are a zealot. And that means there’s no point in talking to you. Enjoy your delusion fanboy.

  • GregMaletic

    sawilsonorg I’d read them before, and it doesn’t take long to search a page for “Asymco” and “Horace Dediu”

  • sawilsonorg

    GregMaletic You are only seeking the evidence to support your biased conclusion. You have “faith”. You don’t need evidence. We are done. I’m not going to waste my precious time on someone unworthy.

  • GregMaletic

    sawilsonorg I’m seeking any evidence at all of your assertion that Horace Dediu is a “paid shill” who was “busted recently”.

  • sawilsonorg

    GregMaletic I’m not repeating myself because you are a zealot.

  • xds

    sawilsonorg, I have to admit that you are very entertaining.  In the technology industry it is very common for companies who are worried about competitor products to hire trolls to bash (over a period of days) other products on popular internet forums.  So, who do you work for?  I’m going to guess Samsung, Motorola, or Google.
    Your hatred of this watch is too forced, so I suggest you ease it up a little on the next forum you troll.  You will be a little less obvious then.

  • sawilsonorg

    xds My hatred of the watch is because it’s ugly. I mean, look at it. It’s the exact opposite of what resonates with consumers. Apple clearly set out to slam dunk the Samsung Galaxy Gear by making a more elegant copy of it. They didn’t anticipate the moto 360. Because of this, they had no supply line for round screens, and no choice but to continue down the wrong path, then market the piss out of it with sites like this one, and forced placement in fashion shows. You should hear about the people ridiculing it in Paris when they put it on display at Colette store. It’s like a joke to the french. They have real watches there. The UI is ugly as sin. It’s not a good design. I do not posses magic powers. I did not force Apple to make a hideous watch. Furthermore, I just layed into Google on my blog and accused them of being bad samaritans for not warning Android makers that the Microsoft “Android Patents” were fake. Do you know how many different kinds of fanboy I get accused of being in a week because I cut nobody any slack?

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  • iamcalledryan

    i don’t think you are reading my posts properly. I am talking about the quartz segment not the high end. The quartz market is a sub-market worth about 4bn CHF whereas the mid-to-high end mechanical market is closer to 20bn CHF. But the quartz market has a much larger pool of brands and a higher volume of units. Wearable tech is going to do two things: 1) Enlarge the “watch” consumer base in general – exactly those nerdy types you speak of, and 2) pull market share from the existing quartz/fashion watch market. So it is the hundred plus entry level brands that are going to suffer very hard – the same companies that have benefited from the crisis of the 70’s will go under unless they differenciate themselves from wearable tech fast or embrace it through JVs and accesory designs. I have never insinuated that mid-level brands like Breitling will be heavily effected by this, and the high-end and vintage markets will be totally unscathed.

  • iamcalledryan

    Every month 1-2 million Swiss quartz watches are sold; this figure is going to drop dramatically as consumers pause to consider wearable tech. Right now I can’t see the apple watch attracting non-iphone users, but if they create something that can operate independently, they will have a chance. It is the fan-fair and media attention that will shed light on the existing market in a way that only tech nerds have been in the fold up till now.

  • GregMaletic

    I can’t see how the high-end won’t be unscathed. Most folks will only wear one watch, and if smart watches prove as useful as I suspect they will be in the long run, watches that only tell time—no matter how beautiful—will lose out. (Think how many high-end writing instruments are sold now versus two generations ago.)

  • iamcalledryan

    I don’t think he wants you to repeat yourself; he, like me, was interested in whether there was any evidence behind your comments. He provided some evidence, you discredited it, he asked you to support your accusation, and you didn’t.

  • sawilsonorg

    iamcalledryan You are ridiculous. From a pure value standpoint, NONE of those should have sold since the creation of the digital watch, and cheap alternatives like Apple’s new eyesore. None of them. Apple isn’t big enough to make a difference in radio or instore payments. iRadio and iBeacons failed. And you think these wannabes are going to disrupt the watch industry? Please. Other and making me some money when I short some stocks because idiots are freaking out, this means nothing to me, you, or the watch industry.

  • sawilsonorg

    iamcalledryan I don’t think you realize most people don’t wear watches anymore. They look at their cell phones. And the people that do wear watches probably don’t care what kind of phone they have. There’s a chain of dependencies here you aren’t taking into consideration because of your fanboy dreams. Apple will sell 20 million of these things to that 40 percent of Apple users that have to buy every stupid thing they put their logo on. Then it will go nowhere. Like iRadio, iBeacons, Apple TV, etc.

  • sawilsonorg

    iamcalledryan I did. He did a concocted chart where he claimed Apple makes 60 percent of the profits from pc sales, but omitted the entire PC Gaming industry. That’s what he does. That’s how me manufactures statistics for Apple. He omits vast swaths of data to boost Apple’s numbers. And like i said, he has done this many times. Since he can’t fake the numbers, he manipulates the scale. Apple doesn’t win? Remove all of China from the numbers. He did that. Remove Sony. Pretend they don’t even exist. He’s a shill.

  • iamcalledryan

    So the 30 million swiss watches that are exported each year are going to landfill I suppose. You are ridiculous; a total absence of fact to support your jaded drivvle. As I said before this type of wearable tech is going to attract both the people who have empty real estate on their wrist, and existing fashion watch wearers who don’t care about what is under the hood. How many times have you talk about iRadio and iBeacon failing? what the hell does that have to do with anything? You sound like a jilted bride, it’s embarassing. I have no allegiance to Apple, I have a blackberry, an ipad mini, and a surface. I couldn’t care less about the lable on my gadget – tech is far too perishable to mean to me what a watch does. You appear to know very little about the actual watch industry – you have so far just name dropped a couple of brands and made one of your classic ignorant comments about “most people”. Forgiveable if you are 15 but I expect you are either a troll or a very sad man.

  • iamcalledryan

    You might be right in the longer term. I think they will have to have gps, wifi, long life, and small proportions before mr Smith leaves his Moser & Cie in the winder. Few years off that I would say.

  • iamcalledryan

    You know we don’t mind if you actually talk positively about the alternatives. Why not talk about how android will impact the watch market – are you actually saying that wearable tech will never take off on the wrist or just that apple made a watch you don’t like and are not as successfull as everyone thinks?

  • sawilsonorg

    iamcalledryan No silly. Because people that buy buy 10,000 dollar watches don’t care about Apple’s cheap junk. Or, they’ll buy both and still not wear Apple’s junk with a 3000 dollar suit. Could you imagine that? Please.

  • sawilsonorg

    iamcalledryan Honestly? I don’t think anybody is going to impact the watch market with a product yet. The Moto 360 gets a lot of things right, but they got a LOT wrong. And I don’t appreciate how flowery the reviews of it have been now that I’m in possession of one. There’s a lot to love about it, but I don’t like how they did the back of it, or the lugs.

  • sawilsonorg

    iamcalledryan I don’t think it’s the same market. “Each Tech” is what I’d call the evolving market that smart watches reside in. It was started by Google with Google Glass, and that failed to resonate. We like tech that gets out of your way. Moto released a product called “Hint” that’s an earpiece. You talk to the thing, and it does meaningful things and talks back. That’s closer along the evolutionary line to what we’ll eventually see. The contact lenses Google are working on will be a little closer. I was handed Glass for free, tried them for a few days, and gave them back. The only feature I cared about was voice commands. Because I’m a keyboard jockey 8-16 hours a day. The “killer app’ for me was being able to ask Glass simple math or research questions without having to stop what i was doing. I got that same functionality with a Moto X, then later with Android Wear. So my LG G Watch, and now my Moto 360 function like a personal research assistant, that also warns me about meetings and phone calls and texts and hangouts and posts on sites like these. I got told about your reply by my watch. But it could have been a necklace or a ring or a hidden Moto Hint in my ear. The company that cracks that usage scenario and perfects it will win. How do you keep people aware of the things that matter to them with a strong context driven engine in the back, and stay out of their way.

  • EhUp

    sawilsonorg
    Are you sure that was why they called you a moron?

  • EhUp

    sawilsonorg

    The UK make Land Rovers as well, They break down all the time.

  • sawilsonorg

    EhUp I don’t think you are protecting Apple well enough. They won’t be your girlfriend now. : (

  • EhUp

    sawilsonorg

    Your photo looks awful young for someone with 30 years experience. You either wore very well, started at 5, or are talking bollocks. (I suspect the latter)

    And if you truly ran any kind of business and thing that profits don’t matter, you probably didn’t survive very long.

  • sawilsonorg

    EhUp blah blah blah blah blah. You are boring.

  • sawilsonorg MehNitesh Apple never said that the iPhone was going to use sapphire screens.  Rumor sites did — don’t confuse unofficial hype for reality.

  • MehNitesh Yeah, it’s basically a way to make a Gorilla Glass-like cover sound more exotic than it is.  It’ll be fine, Also, note that this is only on the Watch Sport — the Watch and Watch Edition both use sapphire.

  • sawilsonorg

    jonfingas Oh, they tried. They just didn’t posses the skill to pull it off.

  • KyleMcMahon

    @sawilsonorg 87% of who uses Android? Currently Android has a 52% Marketshare and Apple has 46%. iOS is actually the only OS that’s grown in the last 3 quarters while Android has lost Marketshare. Further, iOS is available on 1 or 2 phones a year compared to the500+ android phones released every year which makes Apples Marketshare all the more remarkable. Not to mention for 7 years runnin the iPhone has been the top selling phone in the world. Lastly, 98% of the Fortune 500 uses iOS. I guess you just like making things up.

  • KyleMcMahon

    @samwilsonorg I’ll repeat…iPhone top selling phone in the world for the last 7 years. No better Marketshare than that. Android lost 1.8% Marketshare last quarter. IOS gained it

  • KyleMcMahon

    @samwilsonorg – why do you keep repeating the lie that Apple is losing Marketshare? They’re theONLY OS who’s gained it.

  • KyleMcMahon

    @samwilsonorg – I’ve got to laugh at you just making things up. Now apples demographic are poor college kids. Here’s reality bud cuz you need a very large dose of it Apple takes nearly 70% of smart phone users making over $100,000 per year. Guess what that means? 7 out of 10 rich people buy apple.

  • KyleMcMahon

    Lol Moto360 has just shipped its millionth watch. Apple is ramping up production of 20 million in its first year. Just as they have the top selling MP3 player top selling smartphone and top selling tablet, they’ll have the top selling watch as we’ll.

  • KyleMcMahon

    You keep saying iRadio and I wackos havwgone nowhere. You do realize iRadio is now the third largest streaming service in the world, right? And it’s not even launched in most countries yet. You also realize iNeavin hasn’t launched yet right? It was give to a number of chains on a beta basis which is now complete and will expand due to their success? You realize Apple TV is selling4 million units a quarter right? And that apple pay will do what google wallet couldn’t do and will revolutionize payments right?

  • sawilsonorg

    KyleMcMahon I’m talking about the whole world. Not just your tiny little part of it.

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  • TonyAlameda

    Thank you for a thoughtful and experienced review of a phone that’s not even been released yet. You don’t get these kind of reviews from Cnet and NYT. Keep up the good work and post again when you actually wear one for awhile.
    Here’s the ONE thing that watchophiles will have a hard time dealing with when it comes to smart watches: we like to wear ALL our watches. They are a style, taste, and power statement. That’s what motivates us. In order for the apple watch (or any great smart watch of the future) to succeed, you need to wear it constantly–the antithesis of the watch lover.
    So it’ll be hard for us to swallow. Both wrists? Maybe that’s the TRUE watch trend of the future?

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  • Takeoa

    sawilsonorg jonfingas bla. Apple would be the only company to possess any skills in the industry. Real sapphire glass just is harder to be supplied in the necessary quantity and the new glass on the iPhone 6 is already very good.

  • Takeoa

    sawilsonorg iamcalledryan Android surpassed iOS in corporate? Funny statement with no proof.
    Oh and Android Wear is still far far far far away from being useful. I will make a bet Google is eyeing Apple’s new platform for the Apple Watch to catch up with soon.

  • Takeoa

    sawilsonorg iamcalledryan And how about you tell us what kind of people buy Android?

  • sawilsonorg

    Takeoa “Apple would be the only company to possess any skills in the industry.” 

    No, that’s what idiot think. And that’s when we know we can start ignoring you.

  • sawilsonorg

    Takeoa Easy. Android owns every demographic. It has 87 percent market share. So the answer is: Everyone.

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  • ShawnBehnam

    sawilsonorg GregMaletic Claiming apple’s 64bit processing is useless just made you lose this debate.  Better luck next time TROLL.

  • sawilsonorg

    ShawnBehnam I didn’t say it was useless. I said it was a pointless marketing gimmick. Better luck next time kid.

  • GaranceD

    TonyAlameda It’s an interesting idea that people might start wearing devices on both wrists.  What I find most interesting about the AppleWatch are some of the non-watch features, but I am concerned on how long a battery charge will last.  If I do get an AppleWatch, then it might very well be that I’ll continue to wear my current watch as well as the AppleWatch until I have more experience with the AppleWatch.  I already own my current watch, so it wouldn’t cost me anything to keep wearing it.

    As to most of the comments on this thread, I don’t know why people spend so much energy trying to convince others that “Apple is Great” or “Apple is Dead”.  It isn’t like you’re going to make your wish come true by convincing ten people who are following a thread about watches, and a new device which we can’t even buy yet.  Time will tell us the fate of Apple.  The only reason I’m following this article is because it seemed like a well-thoughtout article about the AppleWatch.  I obviously won’t decide to buy an AppleWatch for at least another six months, but I appreciate the thoughts which went into this article.

  • ShawnBehnam

    sawilsonorg ShawnBehnam A troll trying to make a difference between pointless and useless.  Better luck next time middle aged man.

  • sawilsonorg

    ShawnBehnam Oh ha ha ha ha. Say something mean about my mom!

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  • groberts1980

    Best article I’ve read thus far on the Apple Watch. My main concerns are price and battery life. $349 is a price I’m okay paying, but I want the steel and sapphire edition because they will hold up better. It’s tough to pay much more for an electronic device that will be updated and replaced in a year.

    I have a Pebble watch right now that gets about a week of battery life. I wear it to sleep because I use it as my wake up alarm. A nice vibration on the wrist beats a blaring audio alarm every day of the week.

  • groberts1980

    sawilsonorg Takeoa Please, go troll somewhere else. You’re obviously an Apple hater with nothing productive to say.

  • sawilsonorg

    groberts1980 This is a watch blog. Not an Apple blog. You go somewhere else. I like it here. You are clearly trolling me.

  • groberts1980

    sawilsonorg iamcalledryan I believe Android as an OS has surpassed iOS in mobile usage. No single company has surpassed Apple in mobile usage. Android spans many many devices from many companies. iOS only exists on Apple devices. It’s only logical that the Android OS would have a bigger market share. But I’m betting Apple is the only company with the market share they have.

  • sawilsonorg

    groberts1980 Stop trolling me right now troll or I’ll report you troll. 

    Troll.

  • groberts1980

    sawilsonorg groberts1980 You can’t be serious. I responded to your comment with an informative response. That’s not trolling. Report all you want to. You realize you sound like a 14 year old, right?

  • sawilsonorg

    groberts1980 Stop this trolling now. Not all of us are apple tech nerds. Go away nerd. Go troll other nerds in the nerd kingdom.

  • groberts1980

    Can I just recommend that people not respond to http://www.livefyre.com/profile/18591456/ in these comment sections? After a few replies myself I’ve realized what a hateful, spiteful toll this individual is. Responding to him just feeds his vitriol.

  • groberts1980 The price of passion. Am I right? Funny things happen when people “love” so much.

  • sawilsonorg

    groberts1980 Could you please just stop trolling troll? Go away. We don’t need trolls like you here. Go back to Cnet or wherever you came from. This is a polite blog and we don’t personally attack people here like you tech nerds do.

  • groberts1980

    aBlogtoWatch groberts1980 Apparently. I landed on this blog from a Reddit post, but I”ll never come back due to the likes of sawilsonorg posting here. I though some Redditors can be bad, but this guy is the worst I’ve ever seen.

  • sawilsonorg

    groberts1980 Go ahead and leave troll. We don’t need reddit trolls like you here ruining our forum and attacking people with your Apple nonsense.

  • groberts1980 aBlogtoWatch We received a lot of new readers after our Apple watch coverage. Many of them are fantastic and outspoken. We have a policy to allow comments of all types (unless they are SPAM). We hope that everyone gets along because I think we are all here for the same reason. When we have a difference of opinion it is a good thing, and I try to lead by example by explaining my position to others and trying to indicate in detail where I think they might need to reconsider their position. We are all here to learn, enjoy, and share. Thanks for coming, and I hope we will see you again.

  • groberts1980

    aBlogtoWatch groberts1980 I get what you’re saying, I really do. But read this guy’s posts. Just read them. Personally I believe you should allow posts that are not spam or trolling. This one commenter has got to be causing other people to leave and/or not participate in the discussion. He’s lowering the quality of your site.

  • spenumatsa

    groberts1980 aBlogtoWatch I have to agree with groberts1980. The reason i came to this blog was to read the good article about the Apple Watch. But with some people making this a platform to abuse other and force their opinions on others, i frankly don’t feel like coming back. I agree that people have opinions of their own, but some people are taking it too far.

  • spenumatsa

    groberts1980 aBlogtoWatch

  • groberts1980

    spenumatsa groberts1980 aBlogtoWatch This is just my experience, but I’ve noticed that Apple fanatics (of which I am one) stick to Apple articles and forums because they like to talk about Apple products. Android fanatics, on the other hand, spend an inordinate amount of time in Apple forums/articles bashing Apple products and pushing Android products. My experience is further proved by the comment section here, especially by the user in question.

  • sawilsonorg

    groberts1980 Look at you launching a personal attack against one person, spamming this blog with your nonsense because you don’t like reality. Pushing your cognitive dissonance on us. Lying to people. Actively trying to hurt and abuse someone just because you disagree with them. Go back to the hole you crawled out of troll.

  • Gentlemen, allow me to exercise a little diplomacy and start with the premise that we are all here for a mutual love of this stuff we don’t all have to long the same items and I am sure we all have goo reasons why we like what we do. I always advocate support of the segment and that everyone here commenting is your friend. A few people are a bit upset, and I don’t think anyone here intends to hurt anyone else’s feelings. Let’s all be good sports and give people a fair shot to voice themselves and not feel alienated from the conversation. Thanks for keeping aBlogtoWatch a great place to visit.

  • TonyAlameda

    aBlogtoWatch It’s completely within your right to delete these ridiculous posts and block offenders. Editorial oversite and good sense is what is severely lacking on the web.

  • oroloi

    What a great site and a fantastic article, been registered with ablogtowatch email for years and joined the forum after reading this excellent article about the apple watch. This is my third post and probably my last. First to praise Ariel and second to a another member here. this third post is to say I will continue reading the excellent watch articles but won’t bother wasting my time on this thread as I have better things to do with my life.
    @groberts1980, I know exactly how you feel.
    @ablogtowatch, Over the years I have recommended your site to other watch nuts and we all agree it’s an excellent site, keep up the good work.
    Yes I do use apple products by choice, nobody told me to and I didn’t ask anybody for permission to use them.
    Think Different 🙂

  • That’s very pleasant to hear and thanks for being part of tthe conversation least for now, and part of the audience more often 🙂

  • sawilsonorg

    oroloi There’s nothing wrong with using Apple products. I use Apple products. The problem is when you point out clear and obvious flaws, and the nuttier of Apple users come down on you with the force of religious jihad. Even when you are telling the honest to God’s truth. They don’t want the truth. And there are no zealots worse than Apple zealots. Look at all the names I’ve been called by these morons just for telling the truth.

  • SantiagoT

    In the article I wrote about smart watches I said that companies like JeanRichard or Bell & Ross will be the ones suffering the consequences of gold/titanium/high end Apple watches. Well, the other day I had the chance of asking Mr. Carlos Rosillo in person. 

    Unfortunately I chickened out.

    No, I’m kidding, I did ask him. He said that smart watches are no threat to the watches because they appeal to different likings and they will lose their value over the years, which is just the opposite of what happens with watches. And they will end up being useless in 2, 3 or 4 years because of the change in technology.

    In this he thinks no different than Mr. Hayek for instance. The last thing he said was “technology only competes with technology” And after that we went back to attacking the Spanish ham on the table in front of us.

    So now you know; and remeber kids, you read this first on A Blog To Watch (even before than on my own blog!). 
    Cheers.

  • sawilsonorg

    SantiagoT Finally. A voice of reason.

  • GregMaletic

    SantiagoT It is fascinating to hear the opinions of the people actually in the industry!

    My own take is that, unfortunately, this is what folks in the traditional phone/landline business told themselves before those industries became relics. Traditional watches won’t go completely away. But they will, despite their beauty and benefits, mostly go away.

  • SantiagoT I think he’s at once right and wrong.

    Traditional watches do gain value, and there is a concern that smartwatches will be disposable in a way conventional watches aren’t.

    However, it does sound like he’s trying to reassure himself that everything will be okay, rather than mounting a full defence.  The concern isn’t that someone with a Bell & Ross or Omega will chuck it out in favour of an Apple Watch, or even that Apple necessarily thinks it will sway someone who’s in that price range.  It’s that Apple (and Motorola, and…) will define what watches are for a lot of people, and that this group could eventually eclipse the traditional watch market, even if that traditional market doesn’t shrink.

    Think of it this way: for the longest time, smartphones were a “plus” to the overall cellphone market.  They weren’t shrinking basic phone sales, even when Apple and Google finally made smartphones compelling to a wide audience.  But eventually, there was a tipping point where the traditionalists (we’ve all met that “I just want something for making phone calls!” holdout) were the minority — whatever sacrifices smartphones involved, they were deemed worth it.  I can see that happening with smartwatches.  There may always be a market for mechanical watches, but enough time and technological advances could make it the minority.

  • jonfingas SantiagoT This is a very interesting discussion but I think there are a few realities that the watch industry is not particularly open to considering. They are correct that “technology” has proven not be the the type of thing that allows for value retention like timepieces, but they are wrong in saying that watches are not technology. Watches are technology, but mechanical watches are all items of technology that has been obsolete for so long products today don’t really have to fear more advanced versions in the future. That is why there is much more stability. 

    Further, I love Carlos and others who have voiced similar opinions as colleagues and friends, but speaking rationally I would not listen to people in the watch industry – a highly conservative industry based on last century’s tech – to offer conclusions on what mainstream consumers will do. It is true that mechanical watches and wrist worn gadgets with screens are not the same. I don’t think anyone ever said they were. It is rather that they will be competing for the same space on the wrist, and as soon as Apple and other companies show consumers that there is real utility and convenience in a smartwatch, then the watch companies will be afraid because consumers (even serious watch lovers) are going to be asked to choose between what they perhaps want, and what they perhaps need. So their arguments are moot because the issue isn’t whether or not smartwatches are the same or as good as traditional watches, the issue is whether or not as many people will have available wrist space for them. Hence my decision to occupy both wrists as a way of not having to make a decision.

  • andrekibbe

    SantiagoT I have to agree with jonfingas feature phone/smartphone parallel. I’ve been using smartphones since 2001, when I had a Treo 300, and very few of my peers saw the value in them. Even as late as 2007, when the iPhone entered the market, smartphone penetration in the US was only at 5%. Seven years later it’s at 70% nationwide. In Santa Monica, where I live, I suspect that smartphone above 95% penetration, since I only see a feature phone in the wild ever one or two weeks.

    I expect the aWatch to success of the same reason the iPad did. The iPad got a lukewarm reception when it was release, since it didn’t do anything the iPhone people already carried with them all the time did. The only difference was the convenience it offered due to the larger size. Pundits were looking for something more unique, more significant than additional convenience, so the iPad’s prospects were vastly underestimated.

    The aWatch is the same phenomenon in the opposite direction: added convenience resulting from a small form factor. It doesn’t do anything that you can’t already do with the iPhone you already have, but it’s more convenient for momentary transactions like notifications, directions, biometrics, payments, etc.

    There will probably never be a point where smartwatches will exceed mechanical watches in aesthetic appeal, but the percentage of customers who buy watches primarily for aesthetics will decline, just like the percentage of customers who buy phones for voice quality and small size has declined compared to the convenience of texting with QWERTY. Today’s consumers buy phones for fundamentally different reasons than they did 10 years ago, and the same will happen with watches.

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  • SantiagoT

    Let me mention some of the things I said last 16th of September (this is the link to the full article: http://ow.ly/CAgiJ But since I am Spanish you will notice it is in crazy speak):

    “Up till now smart watches
    were technological devices with very simple forms that reminded us of the old
    Casios with integrated calculator.  But this new design idea had
    already been seen in the Moto 360 by Motorola and the Asus Zen Watch, both with
    classical shapes, leather straps and the promise of many personalisation
    options. But, nobody has an amplifier like Apple.

    Smart watches are not
    really watches as such. They are electronic devices which have, among an array
    of functions, timetelling properties thanks to the small computer they have
    inside. But Casio G-Shock, which has a fan
    base as devoted as the followers of Apple products, are genuine information
    centers backed up by a microprocessor. Some of these models connect to the
    iPhone and Galaxy via Bluetooth with the same functions as call and mail
    alerts. But nobody every doubts that the G-Shock is first and foremost a watch.
    With smart watches however, it’s a different story and we don’t give them the
    benefit of doubt.

     

    Something as basic for a device that wants
    to be a companion on your adventures or exercise routines is missing a GPS
    function (Samsung GearS will be incorporating one soon)
    What is clear though is that the brands
    will make the watches increasingly independent from the mobile phone. For
    example: Samsung Gear can incorporate a SIM card which frees it from Galaxy, a
    sign of where things are heading. If in addition they make the cases more
    resistant to blows and water, then yes, they could be seen as a real threat.
    Quite frankly, looking at the screen of the Apple Watch, the Asus or even the
    modest LG (about to be released) and then look at a G-Shock…
    Another problem that smart watches share with mobile phones is battery
    life, which barely lasts a day. You can forget about taking the watch on long
    trips, camping expeditions or remote locations. What’s more, not one
    manufacturer has created a system to recharge the watch that is compatible with
    the mobile phone. There must be a reason (in addition to generating more
    sales), but with no explication provided it seems Machiavellian to make users
    carry around two separate chargers. Mobiles, which have much bigger batteries,
    have still not solved the problem so in the case of smart watches, I fear
    there’s a long wait ahead. 

    Quartz watches costing between 200-500 euro (the
    price range for smart watches) should see a real threat from the smart watch. I
    don’t believe that anybody who buys a Certina, a Tissot, an Edox (to name
    brands with roots in traditional watchmaking but whose primary business is
    quartz) or for that matter a Viceroy, a Diesel or a Sandoz does so for love of
    traditional watchmaking. It’s often received as a present or an impulse buy
    (like any fashion accessory) and, in the case of men, usually the only
    adornment they wear.
    What is the impediment then to choose a smart
    watch which gives you the same functions as the quartz watch but adds on a
    whole bunch more with an infinite variety of personalization options? You can
    choose the dial of the watch from many options, you can choose the strap from a
    wide range of materials and styles but above all, wearing a smart watch
    transmits a statement about the person wearing it: I am trendy, I am dynamic
    and I lead an active life. What used to be represented by a chronograph is now
    in smart watch terrain. 

    And what about high watchmaking? I do believe that somebody who has bought a Bell & Ross, for example, and wants
    to buy another wrist accessory might be tempted to buy an Apple Watch in
    stainless steel with a Milanese bracelet, instead of, let’s say a JeanRichard.
    That way he/she could wear the electronic watch during the day and the
    mechanical watch to go out on the evenings or at the weekend. Why not? We’re
    not talking about a client who has been transmitted the secret of watchmaking
    in an initiation ceremony. Many of these brands appeal to fashion to sell their
    watches (they often don’t even know which calibre is inside the case and simply
    say ‘automatic movement’).  I am
    convinced that a great part of their sales are due to presence, not mechanics.
    And fashion is where smart watches are going and it won’t be surprising to see
    mid-priced mechanical watches get bitten by the new accessory.

    Another factor
    in the equation is the female market. All watch houses know that it is very
    hard for women to see watches as something beyond an ornament, in the same
    light as a bracelet or a necklace. In this respect, smart watches are a perfect
    match: they are fashionable, they can be personalized and they are cheap.
    What’s more, Apple has approached the world of fashion because it wants the
    brand to personalize their Apple watch and sell it as part of their particular
    universe. In no time at all, we will see famous faces wearing a limited edition
    of xxx brand making the watch all the more desirable and providing free
    marketing for Apple.[This has started already] Taking into account that women use their mobile phone for
    their social relations, they will appreciate what a smart watch offers them
    without having to take their phone out of their handbag.  
    Which takes me to my last
    consideration: Apple has announced that there will be solid gold models as
    well. It’ll be interesting to see what price range they situate themselves in,
    but if they are moderate, they could really hurt brands like Baume&Mercier
    which sells women’s quartz watches in steel cases for several thousand euros.
    It might even hurt a giant like Rolex whose women’s are often given as a jewel
    and status symbol. And it might even open the debate about the enormous jump in
    price when moving on from stainless steel to gold.”

    This is what I was thinking last month, But the other day I remembered something: do you remember what sold 76 million units, generated loads of articles and passionate articles and ended up fading into oblivion? 

    Tamagotchis. 

    I’m not saying, I’m just saying.

  • GregMaletic

    SantiagoT True, but Apple’s track record doesn’t encourage believing that this is a Tamagotchi.

  • sawilsonorg

    GregMaletic Good point With the high profile failures of iRadio and iBeacons, and their complete failure in China, the Apple Watch is probably DOA.

  • GregMaletic

    sawilsonorg http://9to5mac.com/2014/10/03/chinese-iphone-6-4-million/

    And iRadio (which has failed) and iBeacons (which hasn’t)…those products are insignificant.

  • sawilsonorg

    GregMaletic Those were all 4S sales.

    http://marketrealist.com/2014/04/china-mobile-iphone-4s-drive-emerging-market-iphone-sales/

    Sold at near cost. And it only raised their percentage of the market to 12 percent for one month, then they fell back down to 7 percent. Apple is failing horribly in China.

  • GregMaletic

    sawilsonorg

    http://bgr.com/2014/09/30/iphone-6-release-date-5/

    Apple sells their cheapest iPhone in China for 5,288 RMB, or US$862.46. I believe that’s more than what they sell it for in the U.S. without contract.

  • sawilsonorg

    GregMaletic That has nothing to do with anything I said. Apple doesn’t report on individual model sales. Just “iphones”. So they’ll sell a lot of iPhone 4S’s again for 100 bucks, and nothing else.

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  • GregMaletic

    sawilsonorg You say that Apple is dumping phones, but I pointed to an article that says the iPhone 6—their highest-priced phone—is selling spectacularly well.

    And though their low-end 4S is selling well, I haven’t seen anything that suggests they’re selling at anywhere near a loss, or anywhere near the $100 you say. Apple typically is not known for selling product at cost or lower.

    Finally, you seem to be bemoaning the “dump low-end phones” strategy, when that’s precisely how Android has achieved market penetration there. And in the U.S.

  • sawilsonorg

    GregMaletic No, you did not. You linked to nonsense from some zealot site that doesn’t even know Apple is still selling their Chinese market 4S. That doesn’t know Apple hides the models it sells so it will be misinterpreted. My good friend https://plus.google.com/106075758531242552855 was in Shenzhen and saw nobody caring about the new iPhone. You’ll have to do better than fanboy nonsense from some American apple fanboy site.

  • GregMaletic

    sawilsonorg I linked to an article that merely linked to a Chinese news report from Tencent saying that iPhone 6 orders were very high. Neither report suggests that Apple isn’t selling the 4S. (Would it matter? You have yet to offer up any evidence that Apple isn’t making a healthy profit on the 4S.)

    Media reports from Tencent rate lower in your estimation than some guy who “saw nobody caring about the new iPhone”? You have a weird definition of “fanboy nonsense”. Numbers > anecdotes.

  • sawilsonorg

    GregMaletic They are making a “paper profit”. See, since the 4S is a 3 year old device, they’ve declared it NOS (new old stock) and are claiming any money they make from sales as straight profit. That makes the investors happy. It made me happy on the investors call. But it also made me sell my stock. Because I know they have zero plans for China that are going to be long-term successful. They can’t BS China with marketing like they do in the US. China simply isn’t as image obsessed.

  • GregMaletic

    sawilsonorg

    > They can’t BS China with marketing like they do in the US. China simply isn’t as image obsessed. 

    I believe you have that exactly backwards. Asians are obsessed with image and luxury.

    http://www.mercurynews.com/business/ci_23894844/apple-rumored-produce-gold-colored-iphone-chinese-market

  • sawilsonorg

    GregMaletic Sure but it clearly didn’t work. China forced Apple to remake the iPhone 4S in stainless steel because it didn’t meet standards. The chinese market stainless steel 4S is easily the best iPhone ever made, and it still has nearly no market penetration.

  • KPOM

    sawilsonorg Juwon Wee

  • KPOM

    iBeacons were more about getting alerts in store. It is very much stlll alive, and more of a competitor to RFID than NFC. I doubt Apple had to “copy” Google Wallet, since the latter isn’t getting much traction, but by adding a security layer to NFC payments with TouchID, they might generate interest in it for the first time. Apple acquired Beats in part to shore up iTunes Radio, which suggests that they are in it for the long haul.

  • KPOM

    sawilsonorg iamcalledryan Samsung’s profits have dropped for 4 consecutive quarters, and this quarter it will drop 60%. Yet I haven’t heard from you that Samsung is in trouble.

  • KPOM

    sawilsonorg mbelisario But Apple was also a much smaller company back then. iOS sells many times more devices than Macs ever did. There are 200 million iPhones at 9/30/14 that will work with the Apple Watch. Another 60-80 million will be sold this quarter. That’s pretty comparable to the number of devices that will actually work with Android Wear, since not all of the billion or so Android devices active can run the latest versions.

  • KPOM

    sawilsonorg iamcalledryan My guess is that we’ll see Android Wear become more like Apple Watch. Android Wear today seems to be all about notifications.

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM They had no choice but to copy Google Wallet. Especially with PayPass integration. Mastercard wasn’t going to redo their perfectly fine 10 year old NFC system for Apple. So it’s the same secure element, and exact same tech. Again, Apple just likes pretending they invent things. And Google Wallet got plenty of traction. Because it wasn’t ever really Google’s. It was PayPass, which works all over the place. Apple Pay is Paypass. Same exact thing. Sometimes I feel really bad for Apple fans because they outright lie to you on Apple fan sites, and all you have is marketing rhetoric to regurgitate.

  • KPOM

    sawilsonorg GaranceD Only about 25% of Android devices are compatible with Android Wear watches. Every iPhone since the 5 is compatible with the Apple Watch. The markets are comparable in size.

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM I hate Samsung. That, and this thread isn’t even about Samsung. Your fanboy is showing.

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM 66 percent of Android devices are currently compatible with Android Wear.

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM 66 percent of Android devices are compatible with Android Wear, or roughly 9 times the number of Apple devices compatible with their non-existent watch.

  • KPOM

    sawilsonorg KPOM No, your anti-Apple bias is showing. Samsung is clearly Apple’s biggest competitor right now. Not Motorola (which is on its 3rd owner in about as many years). If anyone else in the tech industry has the means to compete at Apple’s level it’s Samsung. They tried but failed to launch Tizen as a competitor to Android, but have announced that future versions of the Gear will run Android Wear.

  • KPOM

    I don’t think the Moto 360 is all that elegant For starters Android Wear doesn’t look like it was designed with round screens in mind. It doesn’t really make use of the rounded space and just looks like a rectangular display UI with features cut off, rather than one with space added. The Moto 360 is also a bulky device that is significantly larger than the Apple Watch. My guess is that Apple considered round designs (considering how much they took from the watch industry in other design aspects), but decided that they couldn’t make a round watch using current technology without it being too big. They are marketing this watch to women BIG TIME, which Motorola will have a hard time doing with the 360 given its size. The Apple Watch is the first one that is drawing so much attention from the fashion industry. Apple, Motorola, LG, Samsung, Swatch, or anyone else needs to create the market. There isn’t much of an existing market for the taking. So getting the fashion industry on board probably benefits the segment as a whole.

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM Apple’s biggest competitor is Google, and Google has turned every iPhone into a Google phone with superior software to Apple’s. Remember that outcry when Google Maps was taken off, and Apple having to beg Google to put it back? Google is about to make more money off an iPhone than Apple does. That’s reality.

  • sawilsonorg

    Takeoa Um, Apple hasn’t even released the Galaxy Gear copy for sale.

  • KPOM

    sawilsonorg KPOM The last time I checked, Apple Maps is still the default and gets far more usage on iOS than Google Maps. It was Google who decided to release Google Maps for iOS (as can anyone else). And once they were no longer the default, Google actually released turn-by-turn navigation for their iOS version, which they never let Apple do with the default application.
    Ever since they sold Motorola, Google doesn’t make or design hardware, though they do partner with OEMs on the Nexus line. And Android is open source, which allows companies like Amazon to fork it (many of the cheap knock-offs in China are also based on open-sourced Android). So it really does come down to hardware designers/manufacturers like Samsung embracing Android in order for Google to pose a real threat.

  • KPOM

    sawilsonorg Juwon Wee I’m not sure I’d call the 360 elegant. It’s WAY too big for a woman.

  • KPOM

    sawilsonorg iamcalledryan Ellen is pushing Samsung because they sponsor her, but I don’t think it’s had an impact on Apple’s sales. Samsung’s actual sales revenue has fallen in the current quarter year on year, while Apple’s has risen.

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM Every phone is Google’s phone. Again, that’s reality. Google has the superior business model. They have the superior ecosystem. Only one out of ten people fall for Apple’s marketing. The rest buy Android. 87 percent marketshare matters. And you can move those goalposts wherever you want. It won’t change reality.

  • KPOM

    sawilsonorg I believe Jennifer Lawrence is actually suing Google. As for the 5c, it was an attempt to make the iPhone 5 cheaper to manufacture. It was never designed to “capture the Chinese market” (it was priced WAY too high to be a “budget” phone). As for the Beats acquisition, how could it be a failure when it just happened and they haven’t integrated it yet? Apple got a streaming service, and also spent about the same as Google did for a company that makes thermostats. Yet no one said Google is “scared.”
    I doubt Joan Rivers got paid to say great things about the iPhone 6 since it came out after she died. “Bendgate” is overblown according to just about everyone, including Consumer Reports, who was at the forefront of “Antennagate” with its refusal to recommend the iPhone 4. Shellshock was a global issue on all Unix-based OSes (including Linux) and has been patched. And it’s Samsung who is being hurt most by Xiaomi in China.

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM No worries. Everybody else thinks so.

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM Samsung is failing in China, just like Apple. Because Xiaomi is cleaning their clocks.

  • KPOM

    sawilsonorg KPOM How does Google have the superior business model? The last time I checked, Apple has a higher market cap (even backing out the cash pile), higher profits, and higher sales. Google has a successful business model, no doubt, but Android is only a small part of it. Google makes money by mining data and selling it to advertisers. They make money from iOS devices as well. But Apple is doing just fine. Market share doesn’t matter as much as you think it does. All a product needs to do is get critical mass to be viable. 13% share, virtually all in the top end of the market where 70% of the profits are is a very viable business model.

  • KPOM

    sawilsonorg GregMaletic Samsung reports their results under IFRS, which doesn’t let them hide 93% of their income. And as a shareholder I do care about Apple’s profits.

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM Google is set to pass Apple in market cap in the next 10 months. After that happens, what will a sad fanboy like you quote then? Hmmm? It’s going to happen. Will you cry?

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM No, she’s suing Apple. Good job making things up though. Apple is closing the streaming service. You must not keep up with the news. The entire point to the Joan Rivers thing is she said glowing market rhetoric about a phone after she was dead. So clearly she was paid to say those things, and it was auto-posted. Now, who would have paid her to say those things?

    Your willful ignorance and your fanboy is showing. Please, keep this up.

  • KPOM

    sawilsonorg KPOM 
    http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr-esq/google-responds-jennifer-lawrence-attorneys-737656
    “Your willful ignorance and your fanboy is showing. Please, keep this up.”
    Indeed, your comments about yourself are quite apt.

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM Samsung has 90 huge companies to hide income with, and do. They’ve been in business since 1938. They were making tech when Apple was two guys in a garage. They are the asian tech mafia, and are less ethical than IBM at their worst. And they keep punishing Apple for acting out, and will continue to do so.

  • KPOM

    sawilsonorg KPOM Joy Corigan launched a class action suit against Apple. Perhaps that’s what you are thinking about.

  • KPOM

    sawilsonorg blueboompony ??? It was Samsung who was fined by authorities in Taiwan for paying for derogatory comments on message boards.

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM Child:

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/model-joy-corrigan-sues-apple-over-naked-icloud-photo-hacking-9733150.html

    That became class action, and they all jumped onboard. 

    Furthermore, Marty Singer isn’t her attorney. The hollywood gossip site you linked got it wrong. He’s an ambulance chaser trying to get a quick settlement. Furthermore you clearly didn’t read the story you linked. Try reading it. When you feel stupid, it’s because you are.

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM Yes. Because Samsung are unethical bags of crap.

  • GregMaletic

    sawilsonorg KPOM That’s not reality. Apple makes about $240 off each iPhone. Google makes $0.

  • GregMaletic

    sawilsonorg KPOM > [Google has] the superior ecosystem.

    You’d be better off not making statements like this. Or, at least, define “superior ecosystem”.

  • KPOM

    I think the most significant development is that the fashion industry seems to be on board with the Apple Watch. That can only benefit the nascent industry. I can’t see a Motorola or Samsung being able to get a spread in Vogue China, or a display at Colette during Fashion Week. Maybe now they can (or will at least think of trying), but Apple has been doing a lot of hiring of top executives in the fashion industry, starting with Angela Ahrendts. While Jony Ive seems to be the public face of the Apple Watch, I think Ahrendts is getting lots done behind the scenes with her connections. I wouldn’t be surprised to see the Apple Watch sold at Burberry stores. That’s the kind of crowd the product will need to appeal to.

  • KPOM

    sawilsonorg KPOM Google may eventually pass up Apple in market cap, but I doubt it will be in the next 10 months. If you are right, though, you should be hoarding up on Google shares. After all, they’ll outperform Apple by 65%, right? That’s what they’d need to do based on the current market caps ($600MM for Apple and $363MM for Google).

  • sawilsonorg

    GregMaletic You clearly don’t understand how Google’s business model works at all to make such a dumb statement. For a while, Google made more money off iOS than they did off Android, at least until Android became more than 70 percent of the smartphone market.

  • sawilsonorg

    GregMaletic Everybody uses Google. Less than 13 percent of us use iOS.

  • KPOM

    GregMaletic sawilsonorg KPOM Google gets ad revenue from searches, and when people use Google Maps and other Google apps. That’s why they rushed to replace Google Maps when Apple dropped them (as flawed as the rollout was, it succeeded in largely supplanting Google Maps for casual usage, as well as hurting Google’s iOS-derived revenue).

  • GregMaletic

    sawilsonorg Again, define “ecosystem”. You just asserted that there are more Android users, which is true. But number and quality of apps, number and quality of accessories…until today, I’ve never heard anyone seriously suggest Android is in the same league as iOS in these regards.

  • KPOM

    sawilsonorg KPOM GM was in business for 91 years. Then they went bankrupt. I doubt very seriously that Samsung is “hiding” their profits and spooking investors when there are plenty of legal ways of avoiding taxes (Apple uses most of those techniques). True, Samsung is more like GE in that it makes anything and everything, but for the past 3 years it’s been mobile that’s driving their profits. They seem to think it will come to an end, and hence they are investing $15 billion to build more chip factories.

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM I won’t touch any tech stock at the moment. Too unpredictable. Look at what has been happened to Apple latey because of the GP sapphire glass scandal.

  • sawilsonorg

    GregMaletic Honestly, from a pure app quality and availability standpoint, they are evenly matched, with Google having more apps, and more niche apps and better prices, and Apple having marginally better apps, but not always having the niche app you might need.

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM Again, your opinion is meaningless. Most people think it’s the best looking smartwatch on the market.

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM The fashion industry openly panned it. The french thought it was “hideous”. The swiss think it’s “a joke”, and real watch makers think it’s a dorky toy for geeks. It’s DOA already.

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM A little. That was before Android had 87 percent of the market. If you hop in a time machine and go back in time two years, you have an argument. Not now though, when Google clearly won the smartphone wars.

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM that’s a neat false dichotomy. Not in any way relevant to reality, but cute nontheless. You clearly don’t know anything about Samsung at all. You should educate yourself. Samsung is the kind of company that has people killed.

  • GregMaletic

    sawilsonorg KPOM “Won” = everyone losing money on Android hand-over-fist, save for Samsung.

    Name some companies not named Samsung and Microsoft who are reporting profits directly as a result of Android handsets.

  • sawilsonorg

    GregMaletic I’m going to humiliate you if you go down this path. You need a time machine to make this argument. I’ll be able to rattle off 5 names before I leave mainland China. Please stop quoting 3 year old Apple Insider talking points.

  • GregMaletic

    sawilsonorg GregMaletic I’m a big boy; I can take it. Name a few from China, and name a few not from China.

  • KPOM

    sawilsonorg KPOM Anna Wintour at Vogue seems to like it, as do the people at Colette. Like all fashion, some critics like it and others don’t. No one “panned” it outright, though. Some thought the design was a bit plain. The only watch that might remotely compete with the Swiss is the Edition, but my guess is that Apple is gunning more for the mall watch crowd than the Patek Phillipe crowd, at least with the earlier models. That they are attempting an 18kt gold edition at the outset is notable in itself, though.

  • KPOM

    sawilsonorg KPOM Who’s “most people”? Selling out doesn’t mean much. The Surface “sold out” as well. Motorola probably didn’t make very many in the initial run. Estimates so far are that Samsung has maybe sold about 3 million Gear in total. Moto 360 may well be a decent seller, but I’m guessing only to men. I don’t see women buying it unless they release a smaller version.

  • KPOM

    SantiagoT But is that the market that Apple is competing against? We’re all talking about the Edition, but it’s the $349 Sport and likely sub-$1000 Watch that are the volume products. A Tissot or Movado doesn’t “gain” in value over time. It’s just a fancy version of a $10 quartz watch that people buy and then replace when they eventually break down. The Edition seems to be there mostly for a halo effect.

  • sawilsonorg

    GregMaletic Xiaomi, Meizu, Oppo, BBK, Vivo, Asus, Lenovo, Samsung, HTC just posted their second profitable quarter (glad they recovered). I think the real question would be what Android makers aren’t making money. The problem is Apple biased idiots in journalism that simply have no idea what they are talking about, and like masturbating Apple. You read their stories, and take them as fact. Plus you’ve got moron shills like Horace Dediu doing his paid Apple advocacy creating nonsense charts. I don’t blame you.

  • KPOM

    groberts1980 Do you think you’ll be a “v2 or v3” buyer of the Apple Watch, assuming that they focus on improving battery life in future generations? It seems like Apple focused on getting the Apple Watch as small as they possibly could with the current state of technology. Fortunately for them they design their own chips and omit silicon that serves no function on the watch, but they still have to deal with the same battery technology as the rest of the industry.

  • KPOM

    MehNitesh It’s possible the glass on the Sport will be different from the glass on the iPhone 6, perhaps to be less scratch-resistant but more shatterproof. There seems to be an inverse correlation between scratch resistance and shatterproofing, one that apparently prevented the use of sapphire in any of the iPhone 6 models. GTAT’s bankruptcy notwithstanding, it seems like Apple still believes in the material but it’s not yet ready for a large screened phone. In watches, though, sapphire is old hat.

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM Women wearing men’s watches turned around on their wrist is still “in fashion”. I know because my girlfriend saw my Moto 360 and immediately ordered one, and she had me put her favorite band on it. Granted, I don’t know anything about fashion. It think fashion is stupid. 

    http://venturebeat.com/2014/09/09/apple-watch-is-ugly-and-boring-and-steve-jobs-would-have-agreed/

    http://www.zdnet.com/so-apples-watch-turned-out-to-be-a-thick-ugly-expensive-yawner-7000033538/

    lol, and my favorite:

    http://www.f169bbs.com/bbs/show_topic/30795-apple-watch-is-ugly-as-shit-only-virgin-geeks-will-wear-it-lets-compare-pics

    And BGR, huge apple fanboy site, most people think it’s hideous.

    http://bgr.com/2014/09/09/apple-watch-design-poll/

    And I have to agree.

  • KPOM

    sawilsonorg KPOM You mean like their CEO who has heart problems?
    You have gone way off the deep end if you subscribe to conspiracy theories that say that Samsung is lying about its profitability. Yes, they are a chaebol with outsized political influence, but in the 1980s people said the same thing about the keiretsu in Japan such as Fuji. They aren’t secretly hiding rising Galaxy sales by claiming they really sold loss-making washing machines or flat screen panels at cost. And even they aren’t fully vertically integrated, as they rely on Qualcomm for their chip designs in their most important markets.

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM I’ll quote my girlfriend: 

    “I like the moto 360 because it actually looks like a watch”.

    And that’s really all anyone has to say. That’s the selling point to these devices. That’s the yardstick consumers set. All the expensive marketing in the world isn’t going to change that reality. Apple simply dropped the ball entirely.

  • groberts1980

    KPOM groberts1980 It’s entirely possible. With current battery technology, it’s just not possible to get more than a day with a color LCD touch screen like that. If it was possible, Apple would have done it. I’m betting Apple has engineers working on battery tech right now. And when they do come out with a v2 or v3 of this watch, I would strongly bet the only thing that will change will be the battery life. For what this does, you just don’t need a faster processor, more RAM, etc. Battery is king here.

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM No, that’s not how it works. They are hiding profits by selling pieces between business units. Their cost per Galaxy Note 4 in reality is probably about 35 dollars. Because they make the screen, battery, ram, processor, casing, etc. The entire thing. They have mines. They mine and refine their own materials. They have their own factories. They even have their own BOATS. The forklift that loads the Samsung boat is made by Samsung. THE CRANE that puts the Samsung manufactured shipping container on the Samsung made boat was also made by Samsung. And they hide all those profits with inter-unit sales. They make literally 90-95 percent margin on each handset sale.

  • KPOM
  • KPOM

    groberts1980 KPOM Hopefully they keep the band designs the same from year to year so that you can transfer your stainless steel link band from v1 to the v3 watch. If they just focus on the battery life, there’s really no reason to alter the design, unless they want to make it a bit thinner to pass the “cuff test” in the future. Even that wouldn’t necessitate changing the latch design.

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM The point is it’s just a very stupid design. They tried to put a phone in a watch. Google was a lot more intelligent about it. Good lord, having to ZOOM to use a tiny postage stamp sizes screen to stab at friggin icons. How mind-numbingly dumb. Having to use a stupid hardware scroll wheel. Trying to hide huge thickness by shaping it like an egg. That’s going to feel horrible on your wrist. Using a proprietary wrist strap instead of making it standard. Again, People love the moto 360 because it actually looks like a watch. The Apple Watch will be another failed Apple product that only the 20 million or so die-hard Apple zealots that will buy anything Apple makes will buy. The line standers. The nuts.

  • groberts1980

    KPOM groberts1980 Agreed, I’m a huge fan of the band designs. Especially the metal mesh one. Their use of magnets looks very cool. I believe they’ve perfected their design and will keep them similar, at least to the point of being able to transfer bands to new versions. Personally I think the internals will change over time, with a focus on battery life. I wouldn’t mind seeing a round version at some point too.

  • KPOM

    sawilsonorg KPOM No they aren’t making a 95% margin on each handset. Not even Apple does that. As for transfer pricing, you aren’t the first to have figured that out. Tax authorities are all over that. And that’s actually how Apple legally avoids taxation using Irish subsidiaries. Financial reporting sees through the tax gimmicks and reports reality. If Samsung sub A is making sweetheart deals to Samsung sub B, that gets reversed out in financial reporting and disclosed all over the place.
    It costs money to build and operate a crane, or a mine, or a boat, or a factory. So even if Samsung owns the factory, it isn’t free for them to make their phones.

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM Of course Apple doesn’t. They aren’t a real tech company. They don’t make anything. They don’t invent anything. Apple margin can never beat Samsung’s. Samsung isn’t buying parts from Apple. Apple is buying parts from Samsung. Samsung is inventing tech. Samsung is making huge margins. And they are very smartly hiding them.

  • KPOM

    groberts1980 KPOM We’ll see on the round version. Unless they redesign the UI to take advantage of the circular space, or the Moto 360 sells like hotcakes and spawns a host of imitators that marry Apple’s band designs with the round look, we may not see a round watch. I’m guessing that Apple considered round designs but concluded they would be too big in order to be usable.
    I like the modern buckle myself, as well as the leather loop band. I’m a bit puzzled why they didn’t offer the bands in more choices, particularly in the Edition. All the leather loop bands are 42mm. The modern buckle looks great, but the ones for the Edition are geared toward women (red with yellow gold, or rose gray leather with rose gold). Rose gold with a black modern buckle in 38mm or 42mm would have looked really sharp, IMO.

  • groberts1980

    KPOM groberts1980 Yeah, I know I’m reaching with the round Apple Watch. I just like the look of the Moto 360, though I would never get one. That section of bottom that isn’t screen ruins the look for me. 

    I’m sure Apple tested them in Jony Ive’s design lab, and had very good reasons for not going with round. I know a lot of people who prefer square watches anyway, they have a more modern look to them. Some other people like to assign skeuomorphic watch faces to the Moto 360 to make them imitate classic mechanical watches.

  • KPOM

    sawilsonorg KPOM And if you weren’t such an anti-Apple troll, you might realize that the more positive press the Apple Watch receives from the fashion press, the better the entire industry is. The Moto 360 is a competent design. While I don’t think it works for women, it’s a solid first effort. If all the attention paid to the Apple Watch rubs off on the Moto 360 or other Android Wear devices, all the better. Moto and LG don’t need to lose for Apple to succeed. The watch industry is huge. Apple can grow its market without costing Samsung, LG, Motorola, or anybody else on a net basis. They can simply take sales from the larger watch market. I’m pretty sure if you ask Eric Schmidt or Lenovo’s CEO they are all for good publicity for the Apple Watch. Just as the iPhone was good for Google’s Android project, so will the Watch be good for Android Wear.

  • KPOM

    sawilsonorg KPOM Apple Watch will sell well. If they convert only 1 in 20 iPhone buyers into Watch buyers next year they’ll have outsold Samsung 3-1 (plus whatever they sell to iPhone 5, 5c, and 5s owners). And it will benefit Motorola, Samsung, LG, and other Google Wear designers, as well, by legitimizing the industry. Apple has an affluent audience willing to spend their money. The electronic watch industry is so nascent that all anyone needs to succeed is to get a portion of its respective market (Android and  iOS) to gain a decent market. I have nothing at all against the Moto 360. If you like it, go ahead and get one. Among the Android Wear devices, it is clearly the best. All I’m saying is that I prefer the Apple Watch. I have a small, almost feminine wrist. I’m toying about getting the 38mm Apple Watch. The 42mm is within the realm of possibility, but with a half-Asian build the 38mm is probably the better choice for me.

  • KPOM

    SantiagoT John Gruber has suggested $5k for the 18kt gold Apple Watch Edition. That’s probably my upper limit. I like the Rose Gold but would prefer better band options than the Sport band or the Rose Gray Leather. What’s your thought?

  • KPOM

    GregMaletic sawilsonorg And Apple compensated for iRadio by buying Beats for about the same price that Google paid for a company that makes thermostats. iBeacons wasn’t meant to replace NFC. It competes against RFID, and seems to be moderately successful.

  • KPOM

    GregMaletic sawilsonorg True. Even a modest success for Apple is good in China. And they reportedly pre-sold 20 million iPhones so far after 1 weekend on sale. That sounds like a decent business to me.

  • KPOM

    sawilsonorg GregMaletic Yes, you are the idiot who is claiming that Samsung is “hiding” profits through intracompany sales, but that Apple somehow is giving away iPhone 4s at $100 (which they aren’t). Your opinion is worthless.

  • KPOM

    sawilsonorg KPOM Sorry, I don’t accept opinions from blow-up dolls.

  • KPOM

    groberts1980 Ugh. You are right. This guy is off his rocker. I have nothing against the Moto 360. It’s a decent watch for 48% of the population. And the market is nascent enough so that everyone can succeed without costing each other. But sawilsonorg is just a tool who can’t stand Apple and predicts a 65% increase in Google’s market cap but isn’t willing to put his money where his mouth is.

  • KPOM

    sawilsonorg So you admit you are lying about your girlfriend? Good to know.

  • KPOM

    groberts1980 KPOM We’ll see. Apple under Tim Cook is clearly more in tune with the market. But I thin that the standard Apple Watch will sell well. There are a LOT of design choices.

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM Apple can buy all the positive press they want for their ugly watch. People won’t care. What moron is going to pay a few grand for a disposable Apple product? All Apple products are disposable. Meant to last a year or two then get thrown away. 
    Half the people in the 360 user group are women. Women love the 360. The industry that Google created with the wildly successful Android Wear products is definitely something Apple might benefit from if they design a better product. If they make it more like Android Wear. Thankfully Apple has no problem copying Google products as evidenced by their copying of Android in iOS 8.

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM hahahaha. You are clearly a young kid. I see how passionate you are with your Apple zealotry. Lets see you temper that childish fanboyism with some knowledge, experience and maturity. Someday you might be successful like me. Make sure you go to college.

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM I’ve linked my evidence child. You don’t have any.

  • sawilsonorg

    KPOM To a little boy like you, having a girlfriend is probably a really big deal I bet.

  • groberts1980

    sawilsonorg You calling someone out on their Apple zealotry is the pot calling the kettle black. You’re so deep in Android devices all you have left is mud to sling towards Apple products and Apple fans.

    And that bit about your girlfriend saying the Moto360 looks like a watch? Has she never seen a square watch design? They’re all over the place. You should take her out more, man. Girls like that.

  • sawilsonorg

    groberts1980 There’s more to looking like a watch than the shape. The Moto 360 looks like  a watch. The Apple abortion looks like something you win at Dave and Busters.

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  • groberts1980

    sawilsonorg With smart watches the shape is all there is. What goes on the shape is all software. Do you even know what you’re talking about?

  • sawilsonorg

    groberts1980 Yes. I linked the poll from BGR where most people think it’s hideous.

  • groberts1980

    sawilsonorg You’re not telling the truth, you are actively making personal attacks at people on this forum. And you’re wrong, Android zealots are worse. At least Apple zealots keep to Apple forums and articles and talk about Apple products. Android zealots actively go on the attack on Apple forums and articles. Apple fans only care about Apple products. They don’t go into Android areas to bash them because we just don’t care.

  • groberts1980

    KPOM I like the Moto360 too, I think it’s a sharp looking watch. Only thing that bothers me is that 15% bottom of the face that isn’t screen. Otherwise I think it looks cool when people design mechanical watch faces to put on it. Personally I’m invested in the Apple ecosystem so it only makes sense to get an Apple Watch or a Pebble (which I already have). Same reason I have an AppleTV  instead of an Amazon or Roku box.

    I don’t even see the need for a smart watch war. The watches are not cross compatible. Android users will get Android Wear watches and Apple users will get Apple Watch or Pebble.

  • sawilsonorg

    groberts1980 Telling the truth about an Apple product isn’t “making personal attacks”. Unless you are delusional.

  • sawilsonorg

    groberts1980 You can be reasonably sure Google will make Android Wear work with iOS. Almost all iOS users are Google users.

  • groberts1980

    sawilsonorg

    Quoting you directly:To a little boy like you, having a girlfriend is probably a really big deal I bet.
    I’ve linked my evidence child. You don’t have any.
    You are clearly a young kid. I see how passionate you are with your Apple zealotry. Lets see you temper that childish fanboyism with some knowledge, experience and maturity. Someday you might be successful like me
    Your willful ignorance and your fanboy is showing.
    Go ahead and leave troll. We don’t need reddit trolls like you here ruining our forum and attacking people with your Apple nonsense. 
    “I’m going to humiliate you if you go down this path.”

    You were saying?

  • sawilsonorg

    groberts1980 Yeah, those aren’t personal attacks. He’s clearly a young boy. I think I was very restraint considering his age.

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  • tr143

    sawilsonorg KPOM Weird that you pan the Apple Watch for being disposable then stick up for Motorola’s identical watch. The Samsung fanboys are as bad as the Apple fanboys these days, unfortunately.

    Neither company needs you to be such an ardent defender. It’s a little sad that people debate to death which smartwatch or smartphone is better when both offer nearly the same functionality. It’s hilarious that you continue to debase yourself for the sake of a small computer.

  • tr143

    sawilsonorg KPOM How many Swiss designers do you see in stores? And why are you dominating the comment section here sticking up for the Moto 360 not even discussed in the article? Shill much?

  • sawilsonorg

    tr143 sawilsonorg KPOM

  • sawilsonorg

    tr143 See other comment

  • I’ll just leave this quote here: “The Apple Watch is nothing but a luxury fitness band.” (Steve Wozniak, Apple co-founder)

  • SantiagoT

    emenezes He also said that “Apple could have had a much bigger share of the smartphone market if it had a larger-screen iPhone for the past three years, It could have competed better with Samsung.”

    Steve Wozniak, the guy who didn’t care for the Apple’s “official” way of thinking

  • emenezes In response:

    “PC guys are not going to just figure this out. They’re not going to just walk in.”

    — Palm CEO Ed Colligan, November 2006.  Two months before Apple unveiled the iPhone, which killed Palm.

    Woz is a smart guy, but the Colligan quote is a textbook example of why you never make broad presumptions about the failure (or success) of a tech product before it launches.  Especially not when it’s Apple, which has a knack for upending entire categories.

  • groberts1980

    jonfingas Exactly. Plenty of people panned the iPad before it came out. Woz hasn’t been a part of Apple in 27 years, I don’t think his opinion means much anymore to be honest.

  • CharmaineCelino
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  • Just look at what Rip van Winkle wore on his wrist when he woke up yesterday!

  • Black Cat X

    We all get it, you are an apple hater.
    The Marc Newson and Jony Ive piece is miles ahead of any smart watch out there, and wipes the floor with any sub 5000 watch,

  • sawilsonorg

    Black Cat X It has 3 hours of battery life, you have to push and hold a button to issue voice commands, and Apple is so clueless and out of ideas, they actually put zoom and icons on a wristwatch. Plus, it’s hideous. It might be the most poorly designed product that has been proposed in ten years.

  • Black Cat X

    Shut up hater, it’s not out yet.

  • sawilsonorg Black Cat X No, a rumor claimed that Apple’s goals as of late 2014 were to have 3-4 hours of non-stop use.  The actual performance is still unknown… and frankly, if you stare at your watch (even a smartwatch) for that many hours in a day, you have bigger concerns.

    Also, let’s drop the hyperbole and see what it’s like in real life, shall we?

  • Black Cat X

    jonfingas sawilsonorg Black Cat X nobody knows what’s apple’s target, much less what it can actually do. But you’re right. If it does 3-4 hours of actual activity, it’s already a LOT.

    Only an idiot would use such a tiny device for that much a day. Get a life.

  • sawilsonorg

    jonfingas By hyperbole, do you mean this article?

  • sawilsonorg

    Black Cat X I use my Zenwatch a hell of a lot more than 3-4 hours a day. Granted, the Apple Galaxy Gear doesn’t look nearly as useful, so people might not use it as much as I use my Zenwatch.

  • Black Cat X

    sawilsonorg Black Cat X no, it doesn’t, it can last more than 3-4 hours, but not with the screen turned on and running apps.

    you’re zenwatch is a piece of crap.

    you have to put in a case to charge every day

    you don’t have optical herthbeat monitor

    no sports features

    no nfc

    the screen is not curved, as the glass, not even optically bounded

    the strap looks like poo

    the case lacks quality of finish

    the battery is small

  • sawilsonorg

    Black Cat X My zenwatch screen is on 24/7. It never goes off. You clearly have no idea what you are talking about apple zealot.

  • oroloi

    Black Cat X

    Don’t waste your time with sawilsong, honestly stay right away

  • oroloi

    Black Cat X

    Totally agree with you, as in miles ahead of any smartwatch.

    As for watches around $5000, thats another story. I would never compare Swiss Watches with any smartwatch because they cater for different needs. 

    Sad part is I will never take the Apple Watch off my wrist onece available and my Swiss Watches will be all alone resting 🙁

  • oroloi

    Just wanted to thank you once again Ariel for this excellent article. Looking at the photos and knowing the Apple Watch is not too far away is exciting, Cant wait to get it 🙂

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  • MountainousMan

    sawilsonorg KPOM Right.  There’s nothing that’s been successful with Android Wear.  The smart watches aren’t selling well, and the Moto 360 looks like a ridiculous, oversized $150 watch from a kiosk in the mall.

  • sawilsonorg

    MountainousMan How can you even say that now that you know how utterly pathetic the iWatch is now?

  • qualitypointopm

    It’s a bold attempt to create a new kind of wrist-worn personal computer that looks like a smartwatch.
    <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KUvH32_aUBw”>Apple Watch Models</a>

  • Josh Jepperson

    The apple watch is on everyone’s lips at school, I have always been interested in watches myself, however for all my friends at school ( I am 18), this is the first watch they have ever been excited or interested in. This is because it is the first true 21st century watch. I am very excited to get my apple watch, and I can already see it introducing a lot of young people to the world of horology!  April 24th please hurry up 😉

  • sawilsonorg

    Josh Jepperson In the real world, I’ve been ripped on twice by complete strangers for having the Apple Watch thanks to SNL, John Stewart, Real Time, and basically all of hollywood picking on the thing mercilessly. I don’t even have one. I have the Asus Zenwatch. I feel bad for anyone that buys Apple’s failure of a watch.

  • Josh Jepperson

    sawilsonorg Josh Jepperson In the end, what people think of me, or apple watch users in general doesn’t matter! We don’t really care. I see it as useful and would like to buy it. It does not affect you in any way at all, no one is trying to force you to buy it:) Is it the fact everyone talks about and anticipates the Apple watch and not your Asus zenwatch (or whatever it is, I have never heard of it) the cause of your despise for Apple Watch? In the end it is just envy. To be blunt, I don’t give a sh*t what watch you buy and you can buy whatever damn thin you want and I’m not going to get involved, and it should be the same for apple watch users. I plan on buying one but why does everyone else get involved. Why does everyone feel the need to put their two bobs worth in just because it’s an apple product, No other company in the world has achieved such a polarisation within society, its intriguing, I shall leave you to your Asus, while I wait for my Apple watch 😀

  • sawilsonorg

    Josh Jepperson sawilsonorg That’s adorable, but no. Apple is fashion tech. It lives and dies on “cool”. If the trendy people hate an Apple product, the dorky people aren’t going to save it. Look at iRadio or iBeacons or even the failing Apple Wallet.

  • Ben Bloesch

    Josh Jepperson Smart young man! You made @sawilsonorg completely irrelevant with his comment haha, gave me a good chuckle. At least there are some smart people such as yourself who realise in the end it is the consumers choice and it should not matter what anyone else thinks. He is simply showing his apple envy as they call it.

  • Josh Jepperson

    sawilsonorg “If the trendy people hate an apple product, the dorky people aren’t going to save it’ Those are your words, and thats EXACTLY why what you think is irrelevant! haha you are not trendy, you are not cool. For crying out loud your a middle – aged dork who sports an asus zenwatch. with a google plus account talking about how ‘cool’ android wear it. Please don’t make me laugh anymore. your the dork hating on apple. you ain’t killing apple’s cool 😉

  • Sammy judd

    sawilsonorg You need to chill out sir. Just embrace the fact apple will soon be the number one watch producer.

  • sawilsonorg Josh Jepperson Hold on, Apple Pay is a failure compared to… what, exactly?  Certainly not Google Wallet.  And let’s not confuse comedy with out and out criticism.  They’ve made fun of iPads and IPhones, too, and that didn’t exactly dampen sales.

    I know you feel compelled to shoehorn things into a preconceived “Apple must fail” narrative, but at least get the facts straight.  I’d rather wait until at least April 27th (the Monday after the Watch launch) before deciding whether or not Apple is in trouble.

  • sawilsonorg

    Josh Jepperson sawilsonorg Oh you poor kid. I really feel for your generation because it’s  the first one not cooler than it’s parents. You can’t afford these devices. We have to buy them for you. And nobody thinks they are cool. I’m sorry. You’ve got Anna Kendrick ripping on this ugly eyesore. Everybody is picking on this despite apple’s marketing effecting folks like yourselves. Other than dumb kids and paid shills, nobody is trying to pretend this stupid joke of a dorky wrist computer is anything but a tax on stupid people.

  • sawilsonorg

    jonfingas sawilsonorg Josh Jepperson Um, Apple Wallet has 2 million users and not growing, a 6 percent fraud rate, and is nowhere close to catching up to the 50 million folks using the original Google Wallet that Apple copied. I’m sorry you believed the shills on apple insider that are trying to pretend it succeeded.

  • sawilsonorg

    Sammy judd I need to chill out? You need to get better at perceiving reality hahaha.

  • oroloi

    sawilsonorg

    (this section contained some harsh words but I deleted them because I don’t want to play your game)……………….. I honestly can’t imagine anyone on this planet to think like you and to be so harsh on people on this and other forums. Seriously chill out and go hang out on the asus (or should I say ass) forum.

    I’m happy for @Josh , he seems excited like me and I can’t wait to get the Apple Watch.

    Go ahead and read all your comments here and on other forums and YOU too will feel sorry for yourself. No one here cares for your negative useless comments.

    I’m sure you are a nice person but I feel you are obsessed with the popularity in Apple and for some reason it hurts you and turns you into an ass (or is that asus) ?

  • Josh Jepperson

    Summed up my thoughts! Thankyou haha

  • sawilsonorg jonfingas Josh Jepperson Once again: please, please get your facts straight.  You just threw me a softball that proves you have no idea what you’re talking about.

    As of today, Google Play gives a “between 10 million and 50 million downloads” figure for Wallet (this was also true in September 2014, according to VentureBeat).  That doesn’t mean that there have been 50 million downloads, and there’s a massive, inescapable difference between downloading the app (or even having it preinstalled) and actually using it for any kind of payments, let alone for in-store payments.  Come back when you have some hard figures for those.  Apple in its earnings report this January noted that two thirds of in-store mobile payments in the US were using Apple Pay, so I don’t see how Google Wallet is “winning” in that context.

    Oh, and that 6% fraud rate?  That comes from a single industry analyst making a guess, and even then, he was saying that the 6 percent rate only exists at “some banks” (i.e. even in his worst case scenario, it’s less than that).  We don’t know the actual fraud rate, so drop the false claims, please.

    http://money.cnn.com/2015/03/18/technology/apple-pay-fraud/index.html

    Not to mention that Apple Pay is only a copy in that it’s a mobile payment system.  The two approaches are fundamentally different in terms of how you actually make a payment and who processes the data.  Plus, Apple showed up to the party three years later, and clearly wasn’t in a rush.  If you think that’s copying, then Google Wallet is just a blatant ripoff of Japan’s FeliCa technology, since it was handling tap-to-pay purchases years earlier.  Of course, you know that’s not true; copying doesn’t simply mean entering the same competitive arena.

  • sawilsonorg

    oroloi You are defending a paid shill. Apple products can’t be sold without them. Look at his posting history genius. Then you’ll figure out why you are so childish you can’t type a  reply without swearing at people lol.

  • sawilsonorg

    jonfingas sawilsonorg Josh Jepperson You can’t possibly be this delusional. That is some of the worst Apple apologizing I’ve ever seen. You have to be a shill. It’s a failure already. Protip: when a non-tech site is saying it’s failure, it’s a failure. And many are.

  • Josh Jepperson

    sawilsonorg I am not paid, I just simply know what I like: and shared my excitement for the apple watch, and all I want is for you to respect that?! you feel the need to tell everyone they are stupid just because we don’t want anything to do with the watch you buy? If you look at you comment history all you have been trying (and failing) to do is bash apple and sing praises for your stupid ass watch. You brought this on yourself with that stupid reply to my comment which was completely irrelevant and unnecessary.

  • Josh Jepperson

    sawilsonorg People like you need to grow and and learn to respect peoples choices. This didn’t even involve you. No one was interrupting your moment with your zen watch. Why on earth target apple watch if you really don’t care about it. You claim it has no relevance and you feel sorry for people buying it… yet, ironically, you have been making the biggest deal about it

  • sawilsonorg

    Josh Jepperson sawilsonorg I told you about my very real experience being publicly chastised because people THOUGHT I had Apple’s smartwatch attempt. Folks repeating things Anna Kendrick said on twitter, John Stewart said on Daily Show, Bill Maher said on his show, etc. Most folks aren’t very bright. Those are Apple’s customers. Those folks were picking on me pretty badly. You lashed out at me like a child. Now I’m done with you. Your opinion is meaningless because it has no value.

  • sawilsonorg

    Josh Jepperson You are clearly a paid shill. Just like the author of this paid advertisement for Apple’s failed Android Wear copy. Good day.

  • Josh Jepperson

    Josh Jepperson https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1DIlgiaLwuc His youtube channel, for anyone who wants even more proof that he is a very bored man who can’t find enough things to complain about in the world :’)

  • Ben Bloesch

    Josh Jepperson HAHAHAHA

  • groberts1980

    You are my new favorite person! I knew this guy was a sad little man but I love having my assumptions validated!

  • groberts1980

    You just have no idea what you’re talking about. You think Apple products can’t be sold without paid shills? Guess what? People buy Apple products because they are good products. People who buy Apple products become evangelists because their stuff is so good. An iPhone purchase leads to a computer purchase which leads to an AppleTV purchase. Once you see quality in a brand, you tend to want more.
    What’s sad to me is how Android fanboys such as yourself tend to spend so much time and energy bashing Apple products. Why not spend your time in an Asus Zenwatch forum talking about your product? Why do you feel the need to hang out here and completely hate on the Apple Watch? History has yet to show whether smart watches will take hold the way smart phones did in 2007 (thanks to Apple, by the way). But I can guarantee you Apple will be a contender in that market space regardless of how many posts you make here.

  • sawilsonorg jonfingas Josh Jepperson I’m presenting hard data.  You’re presenting nothing.  That’s not shilling, that’s called coming prepared for an argument.  And like I said, let’s wait until there are some actual sales numbers before we rush to conclusions, shall we?  Never seen someone so eager to declare something a failure, facts be damned.

  • Josh Jepperson

    Thankyou! Someone who speaks with sense and logic is so refreshing! U0001f44c

  • AndrewZoll

    Clearly your Zen is a piece of crap as you are not a very Zen person. My recommendation: return it and use the proceeds toward an Apple Watch.
    *Dislcaimer* I am not an Apple employee nor am I compensated by Apple I any way, I just love good tech and hate tech assholes.

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