BRM Bombers Watches

BRM Bombers Watches

BRM Bombers Watches   hands on

Typically known for their race car aesthetic themed watches, French BRM (Bernard Richard Manufacture) has recently announced a new collection of watches that are meant to pay tribute to historic bomber planes. These new “Bombers” watches are pretty swanky – with a unique look that does feel plane inspired and celebrates the colorfulness of the unique brand.

The Bombers watches (that forced plurality is going to get annoying. Is each just a “Bomber?”) are playful and fun. They comment on the pop culture and the art historically found on military bomber planes and other flying fortresses. Each of the Bombers’ dials are decorated with graphics that resemble nose and fuselage art, as well as military markers and emblems.

BRM Bombers Watches   hands on

BRM Bombers Watches   hands on

For once, I see very well done propeller style hands. The large hands are used for the hour and minute hands, while more traditional aviator-style hands are used for the chronograph subdials. Legibility is very high here – which I very much appreciate. According to BRM, the style of the watch case and dial are heavily taken from aircraft such as the Spitfire, P-51 Mustang, and the Mitsubishi Zero. Come to think of it, are any of those bomber planes versus fighters? It doesn’t really matter in the end – you get the idea.

The 45mm wide case is a work of art. I love the rivets on the case that hearken to bodies of older aircraft. Not since the famous Tiffany & Co. Streamerica have I seen rivets that look this nice on a watch. The steel case is brushed and in some models offered in black PVD. The rivets however are polished to standout nicely. You then have the hinged articulating lugs for comfort (and style). Over the dial is a sapphire crystal, and the case is water resistant to 100 meters.

BRM Bombers Watches   hands on

BRM Bombers Watches   hands on

You can see that BRM developed a new parachute style logo to go with this collection. The logo is right on the dial with the Bombers name. Rarely is the model name of a watch located on the dial. The dials again are a mix of instrument, art, and plane aesthetics. You can see elements like a compass in there, as well as features taken from traditional aircraft cockpit gauges. BRM did a nice job with the dials, especially given that there is a healthy variety. There are even more dial versions than shown in this article. Doesn’t something about the look remind you of classic baseball art styles?

BRM Bombers Watches   hands on

The super-sized crown and chronograph pushers are part of the charm. They are meant to look like plane noses or lights. The crowns have decorative cabochons that come in a few styles as well. On the rear of the watch is another area that has various art styles. Inside the BRM Bombers watches are Swiss ETA Valjoux 7753 automatic chronograph movements. I really like these pieces for their style, casual yet sophisticated appearance, and theme. Available starting in July 2012, the BRM Bombers collection will be 5,400 Euros in brushed steel or 5,850 Euros in black PVD.

20 comments
Henry Miller
Henry Miller

Should we look forward to an homage to a Vichy Air Force plane?

 

*nod* *nod* *wink* *wink*

CG
CG

Stupidly cartoonish... A real slam on those brave men that won WW2 and crushed the Nazi & Jap war machine... Thank God for them and those that gave all. A Rising Sun watch just evokes the brutality of the Japanese not some relationship with a "bomber"... name a Jap bomber? Can't? typical French concept of history.

Cybotron
Cybotron

I can appreciate the design and trying to be different but these are all over the place.

300Watches
300Watches

This watch would fit in perfectly with the Vietnam Huey Watch that came out a while ago

DG Cayse
DG Cayse

Surprisingly, I find myself actually liking the products from this marque.

After thoroughly viewing their website, which is a pain - technical reasons not esthetic one, I find their use of new materials and technology refreshing.

They also offer a 3 year warranty which is, I believe, rather unique in the business.

While not something that I would wear, without compensation, I applaud their pushing the proverbial envelope in advancing their passions.

SuperStrapper
SuperStrapper

Very nice execution throughout. It is easy to see ebvery detail was considered, which is nice. I do think it is sad/dissapointing that with all this design excellence, the straps attach via springbars. A better lug system could have easily been implimented. BRM must have gotten a great deal on 7753 movements one day, I think every watch they offer contains one (not that I have investigate this thouroughly).

 

These are far ahead of the ultra-hideous racing watches they did in the past, that were basically an excuse to see how many holes can be drilled into logs, cases, hands, straps - whatever.

 

Well done; PVD Spitfire model for me (from what I see here).

Ulysses31
Ulysses31

While the dial designs are obviously not to my taste, I really like the case and lug design.  That precision, heavily engineered look that exploits the natural beauty of the metal rather than covering it up, is always a winner in my book.  The curved and tapering forms are vaguely Ikepod-like.

MarkCarson
MarkCarson

They have a fun look to them.

 

I realize the 7753 is a tall movement, but they sure look like thick cases. How are they to wear with the pushers and crown sticking out so far?

 

BTW - the "Flying Fortress" was the Boeing B-17 bomber of WWII vintage. And yep, the Spitfire, Mustang and Zero were all fighters. While they could do a ground attack rolel, I agree, they are not bombers in the traditional sense.

 

DustForEyes
DustForEyes

For some Asians, putting the Japanese rising sun on a watch is akin to putting a swastika on a watch. I don't think they'll sell many of those in China.

Ulysses31
Ulysses31

 @CG There was a time when I would have agreed with you.  Then I remembered that the watch industry is one of the most frivolous and fashion-oriented industries in the world.  Not a day goes by when some genius cooks up another ridiculous idea for a watch design.    Triviality and frivolity are the corner-stones of the market, or so it seems sometimes.  I'd like to think that I respect our veterans for doing what they had to do, but it's all relative. 

 

You think that the Americans were heroes and that the Rising Sun is an offensive symbol.  I wonder what would happen if we went to some Japanese WWII survivors who came through the fire bombings of Tokyo that slaughtered a hundred thousand, and the atomic bombings that resulted in the deaths of hundreds of thousands more, and asked them if they found the Stars and Stripes offensive?  The Japanese are pragmatic; some would find it offensive and some wouldn't. 

 

The point is both sides did terrible things to their enemy, and so attitudes to various symbols will depends on who you ask.  A patriotic American accepts that manufacturers have the freedom to market whatever designs they feel like (even if some of it is crap).  That's one of the freedoms that was fought for all those years ago.  Besides, a "patriot" would simply pass over buying the Japanese themed watch and go for whatever they liked.  A Japanese nationalist might go for the Rising Sun version.

 

There are many people who have not directly participated in war and for them, it just isn't that offensive to see these things on sale.  While we shouldn't forget the sacrifices made on our behalf, we should also be comforted that so much time has passed since the last major global conflict, and that these symbols of opposing forces no longer have the power they once did over most of us.  By protesting about their use we merely reopen old wounds and I don't think that's a productive thing to do.  All these symbols (and that includes the British and American flags) have their own meanings that pre-date their modern associations.  You're never going to be able to impress upon the young just how truly terrible the situation was back then, and what these symbols truly mean - it's inevitable, so you just have to accept that the seriousness of these symbols fades with time for the majority.

300Watches
300Watches

 @CG I can also name one:

 

Aichi B7A or known in those times as the Shooting Star.

 

The watch is effectively cartoonish, but if you think about it Hugo Boss and Mercedes Benz both were manufacturers for Hitler's and the Nazi's clothes and vehicles, respectively.

 

So really I wouldn't bash a watch simply because of it's design.

nateb123
nateb123

 @CG Whenever someone says "the brave men" you instantly know they're just about to deliver a line of overly-righteous BS.  Take the stick out of your butt.  It's a watch.  BRM isn't going around teabagging veterans.

MarkCarson
MarkCarson

 @CG Yeah, I can name a Japanese bomber:

 

Mitsubishi G4M1 (model 11) "Betty" long-range bomber

 

This is what Admiral Yamamoto was shot down in. While he was an honorable man, he was a big fish (and valid target) and was rightfully disposed of by U.S. forces.

 

While I have been to Japan and have no antipathy towards Japanese people. I wouldn't be caught dead wearing a watch with the rising sun (war flag) on it. Same as if the watch had a Nazi swastika. Notice that the BRM did not put one of those on their Germany "bomber" watch.

nateb123
nateb123

 @DustForEyes I don't think the Chinese market is all that interested in any WWII planes, Japanese or otherwise.  I do kind of wish there was a Messerschmidt one with Maltese Cross or the Luftwaffe version of it.  Maybe a silver or DLC case with olive and beige dial.

 

As it is, I like the Zero one.  Although this is making me sound more and more like an Axis fan haha

MarkCarson
MarkCarson

 @300Watches  @CG I would not buy a Benz or Hugo Boss clothing if it "featured" a Nazi swastika. Nor anything with the Japanese rising sun flag. Interestingly, I think it is illegal to sell stuff in France that is Nazi related. I guess they don't have the same level of heartburn with Japan during WWII.

 

In the end, if you like it - buy it. If it offends you (as one of them does for me), then don't buy it. Simple as that.

Henry Miller
Henry Miller

 @nateb123 " Whenever someone says "the brave men" you instantly know they're just about to deliver a line of overly-righteous BS.  Take the stick out of your butt. It's a watch.  BRM isn't going around teabagging veterans."

 

Boy howdy, that right there is quite an unpleasant response. But as a veteran (U.S. Army), I fully support your right to make such unpleasant, and revealing, comments.

MarkCarson
MarkCarson

 @nateb123  @CG Disagree. Your freedom to make that foolish comment was paid for by the generation that fought and won WWII.

Henry Miller
Henry Miller

 @nateb123 Howdy, Yes, lets do be clear here. You appear to not be able to separate a few simple issues on this thing.

1) Yes, it is a a marketing technique. In my personal opinion a rather dubious one at best. It would appear that the idea man/woman in this company is workin on a lower quality level than the persons who are doing the watch technology. So be it - its not an uncommon occurrence now a days.

A whole lot of people are educated beyond their ability.

2) It is, or at least attempts to be a memorial type marketing plan. Now how well it does or does not accomplish this is a matter for debate. Personally, I don't think its worth a hoot, but they didn't hire me so thats just my opinion. (and you know, or should know, what they say about opinions).

3) Any marketing plan is, or should be, judged by its effectiveness in a) connecting with the target audience b) moving product.

All other "feelings" are secondary.

4) It is a developed ability to agree with someone without appearing to kiss their hind end just as much as it is to disagree with someone while not being a hind end your ownself.

 

Having said that, note that the words "slimy", "patronizing", "BS", references to an object inserted in ones "butt" or "teabagging" did not appear, except in reference, in my reply.

Now you have a real good day and keep in ticking!

 

 

nateb123
nateb123

 @Henry Miller Let's be clear here.  When someone is talking about something as innocuous as a watch and pulls out "the brave men who fought in the war wouldn't like this", it's BS patronizing rhetoric.  The implication is that you're drawing on an undeniable sacrifice of soldiers to back up a point about how much you approve of a consumer product.   As if that was what soldiers fought for.  Then when anyone disagrees with your point, suddenly they're hating on veterans.  It's a blatant, slimy arguing technique.  One you guys just fell for.