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‘Cool & Fun’ Made In Japan: A Visit To Casio G-Shock Watch Headquarters

'Cool & Fun' Made In Japan: A Visit To Casio G-Shock Watch Headquarters Inside the Manufacture

Let’s talk about G-Shock and other premium Casio watch production. Not all Casio watches are produced inside of Japan even if they are designed here. All three of the major Japanese watch companies – Seiko, Citizen, and Casio – have most of their volume products produced in other parts of Asia (such as Thailand), but with more high-end premium models produced inside of Japan. Within domestic production there is further differentiation of quality. For instance, at Casio, they have a “PPL” (“Premium Production Line) room where the company’s absolute top products are made with an incredibly impressive level of care and production refinement.

'Cool & Fun' Made In Japan: A Visit To Casio G-Shock Watch Headquarters Inside the Manufacture

'Cool & Fun' Made In Japan: A Visit To Casio G-Shock Watch Headquarters Inside the Manufacture

Many people don’t realize that a full Casio G-Shock watch takes a total of 2-3 months to produce when taking into consideration all the parts that need to be made. Assembly of each watch takes about 3-4 days, and then each is tested for another 5-7 days. What is tested? Each individual watch produced at Casio Yamagata is water pressure tested and “aged” for several days in both a very hot room and a very cold room. Accuracy is something which is tested previously during the assembly of the movements, which of course also happens in-house. The vast majority of Casio watch production – like the other Japanese watch makers – is highly vertically integrated. Often in ways the Swiss brands that boast “in-house” cannot match.

'Cool & Fun' Made In Japan: A Visit To Casio G-Shock Watch Headquarters Inside the Manufacture

Casio is only now really trying to broadcast more of these messages that would probably make a lot of people look at the brand in a more prestigious light. For years, the Swiss luxury watch industry was a master of marketing while the Japanese were the true masters of innovation. With that said, I’ll give you an example of a favorite part of the Yamagata factory, a room where hands are perfectly aligned.

'Cool & Fun' Made In Japan: A Visit To Casio G-Shock Watch Headquarters Inside the Manufacture

The room has two “G”-shaped production lines – that is, they literally form the letter G. The purpose of these production lines is to set the hands on the dial and then to clean and finally case the watches. First of all, the people working here are Casio’s “Medalists.” For some reason, the brand doesn’t call the people here watch makers. I get that, but they aren’t any less skilled nor do they have any less craftsmanship or technical mastery. There are various levels of these Medalists, and they need both experience and to pass internal exams. There are Gold and Platinum-level Medalists and the top honor goes to “Meisters,” which have been working for at least a decade or so and have continually proven their skills.

'Cool & Fun' Made In Japan: A Visit To Casio G-Shock Watch Headquarters Inside the Manufacture

'Cool & Fun' Made In Japan: A Visit To Casio G-Shock Watch Headquarters Inside the Manufacture

Anyhow, these top-level production employees at Casio populate the PPL spots working in tandem with automated machines to efficiently produce high-end, cool gadget watches. The hand-setting “G” lines are a bit different in that they are much more traditional without having automated belts for the watches. This line begins with a series of processes designed to set analog hands on watches like the Oceanus, MR-G, MT-G, and some other high-end G-Shock models. Hands are manually set using specialized tools and precision cameras allow the operator to carefully check that the position of the hands are perfect. Further, the hands are operated to ensure that they remain perfect as they move. This isn’t just how high-end Swiss watches do it, but Casio takes it a step further. The placement and positioning of the hands must be absolutely perfect, and a healthy amount of time is spent on each individual watch.

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'Cool & Fun' Made In Japan: A Visit To Casio G-Shock Watch Headquarters Inside the Manufacture

Since the dial of the watch was just finished at this step, it makes sense to then immediately protect it by casing the watch. One of the processes involved in casing the watch is to actually put the case in an oven after the dial and movement are inside. This is done before the case-back is attached and is designed to “cook out” any moisture that might lead to fogging/condensation. Casio isn’t making traditional watches, but if you really compare what they are doing (along with their Japanese colleagues) their quality assurance processes are superior to those employed by most European luxury watch makers.

'Cool & Fun' Made In Japan: A Visit To Casio G-Shock Watch Headquarters Inside the Manufacture

I particularly like this process because far too often even high-end quartz movements have hands that aren’t aligned properly and that don’t rest exactly where they should when ticking. Casio is fanatical about quality, toughness, and improving their products and processes, and it really shows. I love those values, and it makes my appreciation for the watches so much higher… especially at what are still very affordable price points for the majority of their products.

'Cool & Fun' Made In Japan: A Visit To Casio G-Shock Watch Headquarters Inside the Manufacture

Growing Up Casio

Casio probably understands the unique position it is in as a watchmaker today when it comes to being an important part of many people’s formative years. My own experience as a Casio consumer is a common story in that – due to price and practicality – the first watch I was given as a child was a Casio. Moreover, I continued to wear a stream of Casio watches until I was done with high school. I was deeply aware of the design and functionality of the watches I was wearing, and as far as my parents were concerned, the relatively cheap prices of each watch meant that buying a new one each few years wasn’t that big of a deal. Thus, it was an interest of mine that they freely entertained because it was cost effective. That really isn’t the case when it comes to most Swiss or otherwise traditional watches.

'Cool & Fun' Made In Japan: A Visit To Casio G-Shock Watch Headquarters Inside the Manufacture

'Cool & Fun' Made In Japan: A Visit To Casio G-Shock Watch Headquarters Inside the Manufacture

Parents are for the most part totally OK getting their kids Casio watches not only because they aren’t expensive but also because they are not prone to breaking. This is a really important point because a lot of parents who otherwise want their kids to have “nice watches” will not buy them until the kids are old enough to be responsible. That isn’t really a factor in something like a G-Shock because it will put up with a kid’s style pretty much better than anything else – and they also happen to look cool.

'Cool & Fun' Made In Japan: A Visit To Casio G-Shock Watch Headquarters Inside the Manufacture

So what happened to the generation of kids starting in the early 1980s going until the early 2000’s who “grew up Casio?” That’s right, they became nostalgic brand loyalists as adults, and it is this for reason, in my opinion, that so many otherwise snobby watch lovers are not only quick to collect G-Shock watches themselves, but also appreciate them on other people’s wrist to the exclusion of most other budget watch brands.

'Cool & Fun' Made In Japan: A Visit To Casio G-Shock Watch Headquarters Inside the Manufacture

Thus, it is Casio’s current challenge to do two things. First, they need to ensure that they offer products appealing to today’s youth so that they can have an opportunity to grow up Casio as well. Second, Casio wants to serve the needs of all its now adult, former child watch wearers who want something that is as cool as the Casio watches they remember, but with enhanced design and quality of execution, functionality, and also style. This is one of the major reasons why the high-end MR-G and MT-G G-Shock collections persist, and it also explains the modern era of high-end G-Shock watches which include products now priced at over $6,000 (limited editions at that price… for now). Check out our hands-on with the $6,200 MR-G Hammer Tone here.

'Cool & Fun' Made In Japan: A Visit To Casio G-Shock Watch Headquarters Inside the Manufacture

The Intelligent Analog Strategy Effect

One of the strangest things for me was seeing more and more Casio watches go from digital to analog. When it comes to legibility, functionality, precision, and convenience, digital screens are for the most part superior to traditional analog dials which use physical markers and hands versus dynamic screens. Why, then, are more and more high-end Casio G-Shock watches increasingly focused on analog displays? This includes both hybrid displays that include a combination of hands along with one or more LCD screens, as well as entirely analog dials which Casio has engineered to offer all or much of the same functionality that people have come to expect from the brand’s digital fare.

'Cool & Fun' Made In Japan: A Visit To Casio G-Shock Watch Headquarters Inside the Manufacture

'Cool & Fun' Made In Japan: A Visit To Casio G-Shock Watch Headquarters Inside the Manufacture

Some people have correctly pointed out that this is a sort of step backwards when it comes to functionality. That would be true, but I will remind those people that we don’t live in a world where people buy watches entirely for functionality anymore. The truth is that among adults analog-dialed watches sell better than those with purely digital faces. What is more, analog-dialed watches offer more personality than digital ones which can create a deeper emotional bond, leading to consumers having a greater desire to purchase those products. Remember, Casio’s marketing strategy with its high-end G-Shock collection is to appeal to that person who grew up Casio but who wants something cool that they can enjoy as an adult.

'Cool & Fun' Made In Japan: A Visit To Casio G-Shock Watch Headquarters Inside the Manufacture

The name for this at Casio is called the “Intelligent Analog Watch Strategy,” and it is the idea that the company is engineering interesting and complicated ways to ensure that a G-Shock does everything a G-Shock should, but with an analog dial. I can’t stress enough the intense R&D budget that continues to go into this work. With digital screens, Casio didn’t have to worry about so much that they need to worry about with analog dials. This has resulted in them having engineering dials through which light can pass to reach the photovoltaic cell or hands that automatically realign to the proper position after the watch has been subject to an extreme shock, for example.

'Cool & Fun' Made In Japan: A Visit To Casio G-Shock Watch Headquarters Inside the Manufacture

Complicated micro-motors and materials were designed to allow hands to move both quickly and attractively when performing functions other than telling the time; Useful low-energy consumption systems that provide light to read the dial in the dark; A “smart access” crown is meant to allow for a variety of functions using the crown in a way similar to that of a traditional watch while also being highly durable. This list could go on, but all of this time and investment is exclusively due to the fact that Casio wanted analog watch dials to do more or less the same things as digital watch dials. If anything, it makes a great story and it offers a staggering amount of variety for consumers.

'Cool & Fun' Made In Japan: A Visit To Casio G-Shock Watch Headquarters Inside the Manufacture

The effect of the Intelligent Analog Watch Strategy for both Casio and consumers has been interesting. The corporate mandate that high-end G-Shock watches be analog spurred a sort of high-design renaissance, in my opinion, at Casio. This culminated in other advances and spending that found its way into many other elements of the watch from the complexity of the case to the functionality of the movement. Casio is intent on pushing its promise of consumer convenience as much as possible into the future. The latest trend has been to integrate GPS time synching functionality into more and more watches.

'Cool & Fun' Made In Japan: A Visit To Casio G-Shock Watch Headquarters Inside the Manufacture

In the future, Casio hopes that as a more cost-effective solution it will be able to connect all of its watches directly to the Internet. This would be a step above the current atomic clock radio signal technology which works well in Japan, but has limited utility in many other parts of the world. For now, Casio is experimenting with Bluetooth technology, but it admits this is a short-term solution. Eventually, it wants to experiment with LTE and other mobile data broadcasting in its watches so that they can always be accurate, anywhere in the world, and still enjoy the G-Shock’s legendary level of being “worry-free.”

'Cool & Fun' Made In Japan: A Visit To Casio G-Shock Watch Headquarters Inside the Manufacture

The insistence that many Casio G-Shock family watches appeal to a more adult demographic continues to prove interesting for Casio watch design. Yes, it is true that these are no longer watches cheap enough for kids to grow up with, but Casio hasn’t abandoned that part of the business. In true Japanese consumer product form, Casio wants to have attractive products for a variety consumer types. The major challenge will continue to be competition from other brands, as well as emerging technology products such as smartwatches – which is a segment that Casio has already entered as well. See our review of Casio’s latest WSD-F10 smart watch here.

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  • word-merchant

    Casio: My second ever watch brand – first was Timex – and one I stuck with for years; I still have fond memories of my AX-210 when I was at school, a watch that had so many functions it was almost sentient.

    I think Casio have lost something in recent years, being prepared to churn out rather generic G-Shock after G-Shock and little else – most sharing exactly the same module within. The wacky ideas seems to been smothered; Casio has reached middle age and the ardour has dimmed.

    But I’m also pleased they’re still going and still remain a powerhouse, as they provide a necessary balance to the Swiss watch industry.

  • David Williams

    A basic Casio served me well throughout school and another later served to “dress down” my appearance – and likelihood of being targeted by ne’er-do-wells – when working and traveling in less salubrious regions of the world. Maybe I should look at the present range!

  • Raymond Wilkie

    Hardly subtle. Big bulky with too much going on.

    • SuperStrapper

      WhWhen did they say they were aiming at subtle? You have a bad habit of bashing watches and brands for things they don’t even do.

      • Raymond Wilkie

        You’r right, in this instance, Subtle was not mentioned in the review and they certainly weren’t designed to be so, specifically the GS ( i was stating the obvious ). Who didn’t have a Casio or Timex growing up. i have a soft spot for this company. That said, this are not to my taste.

        • My Casio is still keeping great time after 8 or so years. I haven’t worn it much in that time though.

    • Larry Holmack

      Some of us aren’t afraid of our watches being noticed. But then again, I have been used to being noticed ever since I was a 6’6″ teenager, so having my watch being noticed doesn’t bother me at all.

      • Raymond Wilkie

        I feel you bud. 6’5 in my shoes. My wrist is not the first place folk look.

        • Larry Holmack

          I hear ya!! I’ve got cousin that is close to 7 feet tall, and my 15 year old nephew is 6’1″…and as my sister tells me…he just keeps growing and growing. He wears a size 15 shoe already….I think in European size that’s a 48 or UK size, it’s a 14.5. I wear a size 14 myself…but I have extremely wide feet…in US sizes I wear a 14 6E. I usually have to go to a specialty store to get my shoes. In my younger days, I used to just get custom made Cowboy boots for everyday wear. Athletic shoes were always tougher to find.

          • Raymond Wilkie

            Don’t talk to me about shoes ! 48 ( 13) here, therefor anything less than 42mm on my wrist just looks daft on me.

  • Looks like your tour there was a lot of fun as well. Thanks for the write up Ariel.

  • SuperStrapper

    Very cool. Probably the most iconic line of watches ever. I have a collection of around 20 G-shocks, and while I have not added on in a few years (just not wearing them much anymore) I’ll never stop being a fan.

    Would enjoy my own visit to that place.

    • beardedman

      “Probably the most iconic line of watches ever.” Possibly Rolex would dispute that. 😉

      • SuperStrapper

        Without a doubt. Other brands as well. But they wouldn’t have what it takes to back it up. G-Shock transcends races, genders, generations, personalities, careers, hobbies, incomes, statuses, and anything else you can think to employ. Professional athletes, high-school students, hiphop icons, cubicle-dwelling administrative assistants, rock stars, dentists, stoner dropouts, fashion moguls, deployed infantry, bay street raiders, natural history professors, mountaineering masters and weekend warriors all wear a G-Shock on the same day, and none of them are brand ambassadors. No other watch brand in history can claim anything close to that. Usually because they simply to not wish to be that accessible and applicable, others because they can’t figure out. G-Shock does the impossible and makes it look effortless.

        • Well said mate!

        • beardedman

          OK, I don’t mean to offend, but we’ve had this discussion before. You are a huge fan of this watch line, as your prose clearly attests. I am not. I like it for what it is (as well as what it isn’t), but it doesn’t do the impossible; I’ve broken many of them but they stood up well and were cheap to replace, so it didn’t matter. It’s a good, inexpensive watch with models that offer a wide range of capability. Great. Iconic? Highly debatable but if it flips your switch I’m happy for you.

          • SuperStrapper

            I’m not offended. Having your own opinion is not offensive. How you choose to project it could be.

            You don’t have to like something to understand it is iconic. What is your definition of iconic? You don’t seem to be disagreeing with my logic, which is the definition of iconic I understand. I’d like the understand why you think it is not only debatable, but ‘highly’ so.

          • beardedman

            I tend to use the dictionary for definitions. Merriam-Webster.com says iconic relates to being an icon which is:

            – a widely known symbol
            – an object of uncritical devotion

            Clearly you are devoted to the brand, and there is no argument I can make one way or another about how you feel, if I even wanted to. But your original statement is something I am disputing. You said, “Probably the most iconic line of watches ever.” Consider that “watches” and “ever” are extremely broad and all-encompassing terms.

            I know the G-Shock is very popular and certainly widely known… does that translate into a widely known *symbol*? (A thing that represents or stands for something else, especially a material object representing something abstract. Think crucifix.) I don’t think a G-Shock watch meets that criteria, at least not under the very broad umbrella of all watches ever. One of the hugely respected (IE: Holy Trinity) Swiss maisons might stand as such a symbol in the timeframe of “ever”, but… surely it is subject to some interpretation or discussion and is why I said “debatable”. If you narrow the scope of your statement, it may be true. I’m willing to hear arguments, but simply saying vast swaths of humanity wear a G-Shock doesn’t do it. Not all who wear one may have uncritical devotion to it. All those people likely wear underwear as well, but that hardly makes underwear iconic as in a symbol for something.

            You have a passion for these things and I applaud that! I’m only trying to put a little perspective in place, not dampen your enthusiasm.

            Cheers!

          • SuperStrapper

            As far as I’m concerned, your Merriam-Webster (even though Oxford is a better dictionary) example agrees with me. And, if something has to be devoted to without any critisim at all is broad and all-encompassing, no? You seem to consider Rolex iconic (and I agree), but I also have critisim of Rolex, so I guess it can’t be iconic? You keep trying to point this back to me as just being a gushing fan. Look at the facts. G-Shock is iconic, just like Rolex. But more so. And the ‘holy trinity’ of watches are far too unobtainable to be true icons, aside from within the terribly small and shrinking universe of watch nerds.

          • beardedman

            I’m not pointing anything back to you. Merely pointing out that you made very broad sweeping statements which are indeed debatable. Not everyone loves and uncritically accepts a crucifix, but that does not make it any less an icon. Casio? Not so much. As for the Holt Trinity of watches being unobtainable, you are absolutely incorrect. They may not attainable in any practical sense for you but that hardly makes them universally unobtainable. People buy them or they would not exist. It’s all about perspective.

          • SuperStrapper

            I guess we’ll have to agree to disagree then.

      • ROFL!

  • Great article. I’ve got a Rangeman (I figured if I was going to go “G” then I’d really go G), and it’s an amazing machine.

  • Sheez Gagoo

    Casio. One of my favourite brands. I love my Swiss mech. watch, but sometimes it`s a relationship like in the Ancien Régime:As a king or a prince you simply had no other choice than get married with a princess or a queen. Casio for me, is the sexy and interresting nanny/housekeeper/whatever that makes you dream…

  • Shawn Lavigne

    love wearing my f 91. light, slim, comfy, accurate. shows time, day, date. great watch. i have a G, but don’t wear it. too big for my needs.

  • Shinytoys

    Casio’s do seem to multiply in numbers around here like rabbits. Part of my everyday rotation, in one form or another.

    • Larry Holmack

      Same here…I have 4 G Shocks now…as I recently added another one…a great find on eBay ( A GD120CM-5 in the brown Camouflage pattern ), that I won for under $70…new in box and all the paper work!!

      • Shinytoys

        you have to be careful, it’s an addiction than can spread like wildfire 🙂

        • Larry Holmack

          Yeah, I know. I sold one of my vintage watches that I wasn’t all that attached to, bought the G Shock and my tickets to F1race today…where I am right now!!

          • Shinytoys

            Lucky pup…

  • Shinytoys

    Thanks also to Ariel for a cool behind the scenes look at the Casio Complex !

  • Bill W

    Sassy. Cool. Cheeky. Made in Japan. Mimi-G.

  • beardedman

    As an inexpensive watch that can take a licking better and also be cooler than Timex, this was the watch I chose when, in the days before cell phones and pagers displaying the time, I needed a watch and also worked at the kind of jobs a dressy watch would not have been safe (for the watch) to wear. They were cheap, tough, and accurate. What more can you ask for? As for being a fashion item, I can only blame the “Transformer” generation for that. Style (as I think of it) and sophistication are not a part of their charm. Geeky tech for it’s own sake is what these exude, even Mr. G. Not a bad thing, but strictly utilitarian for me.

    • The Deplorable Boogur T. Wang

      We have indeed seen the evolution of the G-Shock into a “fashion/trendy” watch.
      Just yesterday, I noticed that it now is the preferred watch for the young “7-Eleven” age set.

  • mtnsicl

    I never understood the G-Shock craze. Over priced pieces of plastic. So, one day I broke down and bought a GW3000. I thought it was pretty good looking. A little more like a normal watch in looks. I thought, with the Tough Movement it would be perfect for riding my mountain bike. Well, I guess it’s not so tough, because It can’t even get through one ride with the time being all messed up by the time I get back. Then the strap gave up on it. Then I had to find, which wasn’t easy, strap adapters so I could put a regular strap on it. I’ll never buy another G-Shock again! So, now I ride with a Red Clover watch that I paid $25 for. It hasn’t let me down for the 6 years I’ve had it.

    • SuperStrapper

      You should have bought a genuine one. Lots of fakes out there, unfortunately.

      • mtnsicl

        Believe me, it’s not a fake.

        • SuperStrapper

          Then I hope you kept it. It’s the only g shock that was ever made that can’t withstand a bike ride.

          • mtnsicl

            Oh yeah. I put a leather NATO on it and it seems to be able to handle the gym, office and everything else just fine. And, if the time does get messed up, it fixes itself with the radio signal at night. I just have so many watches that it doesn’t get very much wrist time.

          • Raymond Wilkie

            You went about with a nato strap on a GS ?

          • mtnsicl

            Listen Cracker Jack, the GW3000 looks a lot like a pilot watch. So, a custom brown Swiss ammo NATO strap looks the cats snatch on this watch. Got sumpin’ say bout it bra??

          • Gokart Mozart

            A pilot style G Shock – that i have to see. Put up a picture please, with or without the nato.

          • mtnsicl

            Google GW3000 NATO. Mine is the image with the watch laying on a blue microfiber towel. It’s on a different leather NATO in this picture. That reminds me, I also had a problem keeping the date on the right number for a long time.

          • mtnsicl

            In fact, they even call it an Aviation Watch! Imaging fucking that!
            http://www.gshock.com/watches/Aviation/GW3000B-1A

  • Shawn Lavigne

    i like G shocks, but resin rot is very disappointing. my gw5600 j developed resin rot after only 5 years, and i hardly wore it. i still have it, sans bezel and on a timex strap.

    • The Deplorable Boogur T. Wang

      I also am a long-time G-Shock fan. I have an “Old School” DW-5600 that just continues on. I have 3 other G-Shocks and just recently, last week, bought a “Casio MDV106-1AV” – which I personally think is one of the best deals in watches going on.
      I have never heard of this ‘resin rot’ thing before. Mine have been thru oil, gasoline, av gas, kerosene as well as mud, blood and large amounts of sweat – No Problems so far.
      Replacement straps are very easy to get from various Amazon sources.
      I also have a Timex “Expedition” that is about 10 yrs old and still ticking.(INDiGLOW Rocks !)

  • The Deplorable Boogur T. Wang

    Thanks Mr. Adams.
    Good and well-received write-up.

    • cg

      Nice article. I won’t look at Casio the same again…

  • “With a metal case and bracelet, Mr. Ibe and his team perhaps for the first time developed a Casio sports watch for style that would live up to the legendary “abuse-resistance” of the G-Shock – though for a more sophisticated audience.”
    I disagree! You’d think somebody that “needs” advanced functions like the ones in every GS are more sophisticated people than someone with a dress watch that at best gives the date that just sits around in a conference room or an office!

    I own two, my first GS I bought with my first salary back in ’95 from my first serious job, I got two Stargates in different colors, one for my dad, one for me. Both are still ticking flawlessly. My second, a Riseman with a dragon on the caseback, I think maybe around 2005 and it also works perfectly after so much abuse it’s almost unbelievable (once I’ve crashed into pavement with the watch face on: I hit a person on my bicycle and had to protect his head by hugging it with my arm and we landed G-Shock first into the street… a couple of scracthes only!).
    Point being, I always want to buy more G-Shocks, but why if I already own two that just refuse to die?

    Does somebody knows what models are these two (last picture) http://ablogtowatch.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Casio-Manufacture-Article-aBlogtoWatch-01.jpg ? Thanks!

    Great article! Very refreshing after the usual mechanical, delicate watches of always!

    • Ariel Adams

      Our pleasure.

  • Raymond Wilkie

    Look, they might be able to do this that and the next thing, withstand atomic bombs and the like but there’s no getting away from the fact that the GS is just plain ugly.

    • I’ve always thought of the G line as being bulky, and way too many things on the dial. However, if the situation arose where I would need one, then a G would be the way to go.

      • Raymond Wilkie

        Are you planning on joining the S.A.S anytime soon ?

        • Heh. You’re a card Raymond.

          But *if* I were joining the S.A.S. I would probably consider a big G watch.

  • Han Cnx

    It may also be worth mentioning that they’re a fashion icon for ladies just the same. It’s difficult to find women who are into (mechanical) watches to the same degree as men, but a lot easier when it comes to G-Shock collecting ladies.. Many have one to match any outfit. And size really isn’t a problem either: tiny lady watches were a 20 century thing.

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/44e2d5bf03a2bc216cd738cfbc100c17a8607093dac970c7e2819e7a8c0fa01d.jpg

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/d22c63a1f3694ab0138d529fe19ec0dc178d978d6ff0ce0234846f24a86e7e49.jpg

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/fd228c0d88b030d3d4e2261315bf22c26132a998e8952d2f568ef8c8db53fba5.jpg

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/2bc304a26bb3a36631b0083e366e87abfafe926b4f3dc69ab07d3bfdcd3d2881.jpg

    • Raymond Wilkie

      Awful.

      • SuperStrapper

        To each his own, but some of us are into women.

  • ??????

    I’ve always appreciated Casio for what they are since I got my blue Illuminator when I was a kid. Today, the watch is 20 years old, but change the battery and it’ll run as perfect as always. It was just the strap which cracked before the watch. However, I don’t get all this noise around G-Shocks which has grown to some crazy degree today. Office plankton wearing bulky 50mm blocks of colored plastic. So much fun.

  • The Deplorable Boogur T. Wang

    I just noticed that if you go to Google, and type in “G-Shock and (anything)” , you get some very interesting results

  • Omar Kardame

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/e42108287c3743642011305a8f14daa9e0ee480da1bc40ed38777d96278fb5c5.jpg
    Thank you very much for a fabulous detailed visit .. Interesting read..

    Can you please tel which is the watch on the hands of gentleman wearing blue shirt?

    I am in love with it

  • DeepEye

    I love g-shocks. I own two of the 5000 series. My main problem with their watches is that i can’t wear them: most g-shocks (the best one) are simply too big, gigantic. I simply don’t like to have a dinner plate on the wrist.

  • HectorAsuipe

    I will always have a G-Shock in the collection.
    Currently use my 9400 Rangeman to set all the other watches, as it syncs up with the atomic clock while I am sleeping.

  • Gokart Mozart

    Is it not possible to do a G-Shock that looks like it was designed for people older than 12?

    Fair enough they are tough but surely it is possible to do something tough and good looking?

    • DeepEye

      The basic GW-5000 or GW-5610 will do. Plain black and simple classic design.

  • Horatius

    Very interesing read. As an owner of a modest collection of mostly mechanical watches I
    appreciate G Shocks and own two of them.

    I have to disagree on:

    “When it comes to legibility, functionality, precision, and convenience, digital screens are for the most part superior to traditional analog dials which use physical markers and hands versus dynamic screens”.

    I understand there are quite a lot of people who favor a digital read out. However, I feel strongly it is as follows:

    “When it comes to legibility, functionality, precision, and convenience, traditional analog dials are allways superior to digital screens”.

    And I know I am not the only one. A dividing subject apparently.

    4 requests for the G Shock designers that undoubtedly will read these comments:

    1 Please do not neglect the customers who prefer moderate sized watches. Too big watches get in the way, and in cold conditions tend to prevent coats and vests from being snug around the wrist. And thye look childish doing so.

    2 Switching to another model very often confuses me sometimes because the modules are operated differently and I am forced to read the manual again. It should be as easy as switching cars.

    3 Use good lume, and apply generously it to the indices as well. Choose contrasting colours for different functions and the same colours for the corresponding chapter rings. And please do not clutter up the dials too much. A lot can be improved on readability without any extra cost.

    4 Most importantly for me: When designing a new model, please choose watch hands that are long enough. Minute and seconds hand should reach the indices. Please!

  • Love this article. Curious about this quote: “Brands like Seiko and Citizen had elaborate dress watch collections with specific models intended for people to get in steps as they went up the corporate ladder.” Can you say more?

  • Alessandro Montanari

    Thanks for a very interesting article Ariel. I just bought a F-91W inspired by the article:)

  • Gary Wright

    Really good piece. Missed it during my Rangeman and Mudmaster purchases in past two months. You really capture something I believe that my G-Shocks and my Rolexes have a lot more in common than many enthusiasts realise – and the cost remains a bargain really. Nice piece, thank you (and can’t do any harm to sales, eh?)

  • outdoorzguy

    Very nice, extremely informative article. Great photos also. Very glad to hear about the attention to detail and care that goes into building the G-shocks that I love. 🙂 https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/ad36e478cb99c47eea578d4dcb8f224ac1a7c9e4ece0e25df1f1b8a622d3b31d.jpg

  • SteVe

    Hello and thank you for this post. I am in Japan, have been a long time gshock lover. I am trying to figure out if I can just show up for the tour of the research facility. It’s a long train ride so I wanted to be sure. If you read this and could answer I would really appreciate it. The website doesn’t mention anything about it

  • Hello! Does anybody know is it possible to visit Casio factory in Japan? Mb they have some kind of excursions? I’m fan of this brand.

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