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IWC Schaffhausen Portugieser Chronograph Watch Joins Bucherer Blue Series

IWC Schaffhausen Portugieser Chronograph Watch Joins Bucherer Blue Series Watch Releases

The latest entrant in the long line of Bucherer Blue Series watches is the IWC Schaffhausen Portugieser Chronograph watch. With just 365 pieces available, this watch, the third IWC and Bucherer Portugieser collaboration, draws heavily on the brand’s nautical roots with its marine-inspired blue and white color scheme.

IWC Schaffhausen Portugieser Chronograph Watch Joins Bucherer Blue Series Watch Releases

This is the first time an official Bucherer Blue Portugieser has been made in anything other than a rose gold case or with a dial that boasts a majority color other than blue. It is rather uncommon for any brand to produce a watch in the Bucherer Blue series that doesn’t feature a majorly blue display. In the current Bucherer Blue collection, only Longines, Audemars Piguet, and Piaget produce special editions for the famed Swiss retailer that feature predominantly white dials. Meanwhile, H. Moser & Cie seems not to have received (or perhaps completely ignored) the memo and produce a couple of brown- and gray-dialed watches. (To each their own, I suppose.)

IWC Schaffhausen Portugieser Chronograph Watch Joins Bucherer Blue Series Watch Releases

The Portugieser collection is known for referencing the sea. The entire range recalls the nautical instruments of old that enabled history’s explorers to chart the globe’s oceans. Rather than being named after the Portuguese Navy, or a famed seafarer who hailed from the Iberian peninsula, the collection is named after two Portuguese clients who approached IWC in 1939, requesting a wristwatch that had the accuracy of a maritime chronometer. IWC accepted the challenge, and the creation of an icon began.

IWC Schaffhausen Portugieser Chronograph Watch Joins Bucherer Blue Series Watch Releases

While the bright and breezy white and blue colorway is perfect for the summer months, so too is the specially created fabric strap fitted to the IWC Schaffhausen Portugieser Chronograph watch. Along with the 40.9mm stainless steel case, this watch is not only comfortable but also perfectly appropriate for an active lifestyle (and ideal for wear 365 days a year — hence, the limitation number).

IWC Schaffhausen Portugieser Chronograph Watch Joins Bucherer Blue Series Watch Releases

Powered by the automatic caliber 79350 (the successor to the 79240, which it replaced around 2007), the IWC Schaffhausen Portugieser Chronograph has an operating frequency of 28,800vph and a power reserve of 44 hours. The movement is based on the Valjoux 7750 and is a reliable timekeeper that has been enhanced by IWC’s replacement of many of the standard 7750 parts with higher grade alternatives. The dial display is clean, with no date or subdial at 9 o’clock to clutter the view. Unfortunately, for fans of movement views, the caseback of this model is closed.

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IWC Schaffhausen Portugieser Chronograph Watch Joins Bucherer Blue Series Watch Releases

The IWC Schaffhausen Portugieser Chronograph watch for the Bucherer Blue Series (ref. IW371492) will be available exclusively at Bucherer boutiques from the end of July 2019. At just CHF 7,900 (around the same in USD, at the time of writing), this 39th watch in the Bucherer Blue Series (created with the help of 20 contributing brands) is easily the most accessible (and versatile) IWC to hit the collection yet. To learn more, visit iwc.com.

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  • Jared

    I like it, but I feel like the seconds hand should have been blue too(or at least black so it would contrast a little against the dial)

  • Getting rid of the date window is a great idea, but they should have used blued hands for the hours, minutes and seconds for legibility, as is the case with the Portuguese Automatic Réserve de Marche or the Chronograph Classic.

    That blue background looks like International Klein Blue, by the way,

    • Independent_George

      Has the Portugieser ever had a date window? I don’t recall the Portugieser ever having a date window.

      • Swiss_Cheese

        There are a couple, though it looks like most of them either don’t have a date (one in the article) or have a pointer date (the perpetual calendar) and I can see why after looking at the blue chrono…

        https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/e55beffd264a5384074c2e5a9a94b4db39524c6e4d665f7578e7339d9d018830.jpg

        https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/6d030966c191c8f196e521609b2da927ed11840df077f2956b3ce2c169067dfd.jpg

        • cluedog12

          Top watch is a perfect example of how to do a date window. Bottom watch is a perfect example of how not to do a date window.

          • Independent_George

            I prefer the bottom.

            We read from left to right, not up and down, so the date at the three is easier for read. Plus, if you wear long sleeves, it’s easier to read the date. There is a reason when Rolex started with date windows, they chose the three o’clock position.

          • cluedog12

            This is an excellent point! The idea of reading left to right (or right to left) is a an important consideration. I’m reminded of the arrow in the FedEx logo and the change made for the Arabic version.

            My online persona, however, only cares about the visual symmetry of the dial. I dogmatically outside edge of the date window should line up on the circular plane that touches the outside edge of the hour index markers.

            See, for example, the original Breitling Chronomat from 1984.

      • Both mine do, but my tired eyes can’t read them.

    • Sheez Gagoo

      They separated the chronohands visually from the time-telling-hands. So the colourscheme makes perfect sense. More chronos should do that.

      • Perhaps, but silver on a white background is hardly readable. They should use a contrasting colo instead.

        • Sheez Gagoo

          Readability in real life is much better than on the pics due to the rounded and polished hands. So they catch the slightest ray of light.

  • In my opinion, the Portuguese Chronograph is one of the most classic, sublimely beautiful watches ever made, and the blue accents only adds to it’s appeal.

  • citanon

    Is it just me or do those forward and backward buttons on your picture overlay never work?

    • Daniel Harper

      100% NOT just you!

  • Nello

    Blah.

  • SuperStrapper

    I’ve never really seen a Portugese that truly wooed me.
    Take whatever you need to from this comment.

  • AreQ_BAH

    What is this strap? I like it.

  • cluedog12

    For collectors who are resigned to the oft-parroted belief that a date window is necessary for a model’s commercial success, I present my Counterargument Exhibit A: The IWC Portugieser Chronograph.

  • Independent_George

    Don’t like this. Prefer the blue production model. This looks too self-consciously like a “sport” version. Looks cheaper too me. Don’t like the blue chapter ring and I hate the strap. Prefer the all the blue hands and the blue Santoni gator strap.

    The production blue Portugieser is one of the best dress Chrono made. This is worse.

    • ray h.

      Can you please put some emotion in these reviews and please be more specific in your likes and dislikes ?
      Kidding, you saying with feeling what you like and dislike is so from the heart , loved it !

  • ProJ

    I like it.