back to top

Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One World Time Watch Hands-On

Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One World Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

In 2016, Chopard is celebrating the 20th anniversary of its manufacture in Fleurier, and while the list of anniversary pieces will extend before the end of the year (wink-wink), today in London the brand launched a new L.U.C GMT and the piece that we are looking at now: the Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One.

Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One World Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

First things first: yes, they’re making a version in steel – that’s the one you see directly above. In commemoration of the 20th anniversary of their manufacture in Fleurier, the Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One is Chopard’s first world-time watch and it’s something of a stunner. Based around a very wearable case size of 42mm, the new Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One manages to mix the more decorative and ornate philosophies of L.U.C with Chopard’s proven ability to make a wearable and accessible everyday watch.

Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One World Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One World Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

On a personal note, it’s relieving to see how, as years go by, Chopard is not giving up one bit of its own DNA and proudly “spicy” design choices. Quality of execution in recent years has allowed L.U.C to punch a few tiers above its price segment (and hit hard), but the designs you will never mistake for something from the more established brands.

Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One World Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One World Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One World Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Available in three versions spanning steel, rose gold and platinum (that’s how you see them from 1st through 3rd in the images just above). The steel and platinum versions are most easily differentiated by their dial coloring – and the platinum’s remarkable heft, as this dense precious metal pulls on the wrist like nothing else. The platinum Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One features what Chopard calls a Blue-Grey dial (that is actually more like “aqua,” a vivid and vibrant metallic green, than anything else) with white accents, while the steel version has a more leisurely black dial with orange luminous accents. All versions measure a welcome 42mm across and 12.1mm thick, with sapphire crystals front and back, and a 50m water resistance.

Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One World Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One World Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

World time watches, like GMTs, come in all shapes and sizes, from passive iterations like Seiko’s now vintage 6117-6400 to partial complications like that of the Nomos Zurich Weltzeit, and true world timers (which show all major time zones at all times) like the Jaeger-LeCoultre Geophysic Universal Time (hands-on here).

Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One World Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One World Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

The Chopard L.U.C time Traveler One is a true world timer, using a rotating 24-hour ring to co-ordinate the time in all of the cities on the ring encircling the dial. Local time and date (a welcome feature nicely interpreted, here indicated by an arrow-pointer on the inner dial) is set by the crown at 2, while the city disc is synchronized with the crown at 4. Once set, the wearer need only glance for their city and read the corresponding hour number from the 24-hour display and the minutes from the minute hand.

Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One World Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One World Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

When you take the new Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One in the hand and pull the globe-marked crown at 4 out to its setting position and turn it, you’ll be surprised to hear a very heavy and satisfying click as the bi-color 24-hour disc jumps in one-hour increments. You can tell that this is not an off-the-shelf solution but something that they did take their time to get it just so. Kudos for small details like this.

Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One World Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One World Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

The Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One uses a new Chopard in-house-made automatic movement, the calibre 01.05-L. It is based on their 01 calibre that was modified to better accommodate this new function. Visible through a display case back, this 4Hz movement is COSC-certified and offers a weekend-beating 60-hour power reserve.

Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One World Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One World Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

I love a world timer, so it’s hard for me to fight the appeal of a steel world timer from Chopard, especially one with a judicious use of orange luminous paint. In fact, the steel Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One borrows some aesthetic elements from Chopard’s gone but not forgotten Pro One Diver. While my tastes would lean towards the steel version, all three versions have a distinct appeal. The bluey-green color of the dial on the platinum version is strange and wonderful and the silver and blue coloring of the rose gold version is also modern and even a bit youthful (for a gold watch, that is).

Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One World Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One World Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

For their first world timer, Chopard looks to have a winner on their hands, as the 42mm sizing should be quite popular for most wrists, and the option of a steel version suggests that Chopard would like people to buy and wear the Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One like an everyday watch. The case shape is classical without being overly vintage-inspired, pulling queues from twin crown models of the Sixties.

Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One World Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One World Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One World Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

The case sides are brushed while the bezel and lug tops are polished to add just a hint of ornamentation that looks nicely matched by Chopard’s selection of a simple alligator leather strap. One thing to note is that the lugs are rather long and, hands-on, the double crown layout adds more visual “weight” – cumulatively these factors make the Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One wear a bit larger the 42mm size would suggest.

Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One World Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One World Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

The Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One will start at US$12,800 in steel, US$22,500 for the rose gold, and finally US$35,200 for the platinum version. While Chopard is definitely late to the world timer game, the the Chopard L.U.C Time Traveler One certainly looks like it has what it takes to contend with the competition and bring new eyes to the L.U.C lineup. chopard.com

Explore

Comments

Disqus Debug thread_id: 5212223214

  • ??????

    Extremely busy dial, tiny hands and sits like hockey puck on the wrist. Love Chopard and especially thier LUC division, but these models are exception from the rule.

  • Chaz

    I’m a sucker for world time and travel/GMT watches. This watch looks gorgeous and I cannot wait to try one on “in the metal”!

    (Love that they went with Geneva instead of Paris, too)

    Thanks!

    • Bill W

      …I’m waiting for the Gorilla worldtimer…

  • MEddie90

    At 12k this has to be one of the more reasonably priced true WT watches on the market. The inhouse movement is gorgeous, great power reserve, surprisingly modest dimensions for a watch this complicated and available is steel. Chopard continue to knock it out of the park, remove the date and seconds hand and I’ll be In love.

    • Chaz

      The fact this actually has the date makes it all the more desirable, for me.

      Nice alternative to the stodgy PP5130

  • DR

    Dear me, that is a beautiful watch. As James suggests, it might wear rather largely, but – as an example of its kind – a real stunner. Great coverage and pictures!

    What a shame that the falling pound will be restricting my horological purchases for about the next thirty years…

    • A_watches

      Agree, it is a shame about the pound! Although given the commodity status of some of the more popular watches, your UK watch should go up in value over time with global prices

    • David Williams

      So buy British! Roger Smith, Christopher Ward, Bremont, Loomes, Garrick, Pinchbeck, Pinion et al (who is this Al…???) would welcome your custom!

      • DR

        Indeed! Let’s support a new dawn of British horological Juche!

        All watches henceforth will be made of English oak, ermine and the tears of Dickensian orphans.

        (Or did Hublot already make a special edition like that?)

        • David Williams

          Ha, very good ideas – maybe with a matching hip flask full of Bulldog spirit!

          • DR

            Indeed, nothing like a quick snifter to take the edge off the cold as you wait in line for your bread ration. At least with my new Winston Spitfire, you can keep track of the passing hours. Perhaps a chronograph function can count down the weeks to the next test at Edgbaston?

            There’ll be no need for a GMT version, as the entire empire will run on Greenwich time!

  • BrJean

    Steel version is not just priced well, it has the best legibility along these three versions thanks to orange accents on the dial. If I’d wish to buy a world-timer watch right now I’d likely have to choose between this one and steel JLC Geophysic Universal Time. And it would be a difficult choice!

  • A_watches

    rose gold and platinum are stunners, not sure about the orange on the steel version, but the steel version offers value compared with the jlc

  • Marius

    To be honest, I was never a big fan of Chopard watches and I don`t like these. Besides the fact that the hands look tiny and the dial is very busy (as ?????? rightly argued), I don`t consider this watch to be “…a wearable and accessible everyday watch.” Let`s be fair, the steel reference costs almost $13,000 and that`s a lot of money, considering that for the same price you could buy the Blancpain Bathyscaphe Flyback Chrono with the great F385 movement featuring 5Hz, silicon spring, flyback with vertical clutch/column wheel, pushers that can be activated at 300m underwater, etc. OK, the Blancpain is not a world-timer, but still…

    Also, I don`t agree with the article mentioning that “Chopard quality of execution in recent years has allowed L.U.C to punch a few tiers above its price segment (and hit hard).” Sure, Chopard make some high-quality movements and cases, but their prices are very similar with Lange, Patek, Breguet or Vacheron. For instance, the LUC Perpetual Cal. Chrono costs almost $100,000 and for this you can pretty much buy a similar Patek or Lange. Similarly, the Choprad LUC XPS 1860 costs around $23,000, for which you could easily buy a Lange 1815. What`s more, the Chopard movement architecture and finishing is not quite as high as that of Lange or Patek, plus the brand name is not even comparable.

    • word-merchant

      Agree with pretty much all you’ve written, especially the point about tiny hands (could we call this the ‘Chopard L.U.C. Trump One’?) but I still rather like the finished article.

      • IanE

        Also the ‘tiny hands’ tend to go with World Timers because of the way the various index rings work (e.g. The Patek Philippe 5130). As so often, the date ring here exacerbates this, but I prefer this solution to a date window!

    • David Bredan

      Thanks for your comment. Surely, the statement you mention in the second segment cannot be applied to every watch in every price category. Examples can be found though and just to take one, let’s look at the L.U.C XPS 1860 that you mentioned: in gold indeed it is $23k (with a Geneva Seal movement), but Chopard, unlike Lange, also makes it in steel with a non-Geneva Seal movement that actually sports almost perfectly identical finishing to the gold model (save for a swan-neck regulator) for $9,470. Looking at this micro-rotor in-house movement for under 10k I can’t say that it’s not punching a few tiers above. http://ablogtowatch.com/chopard-luc-xps-1860-watches-steel-gold/

      • Marius

        I agree with you that the steel XPS 1860 offers good value. Nevertheless, I wouldn`t say that the non-Geneva Seal movement has an almost identical finishing (save for the swan-neck regulator) with the Geneva Seal version. In fact, the picture below shows the differences in decoration, especially looking at the anglage, Geneva stripes, and the polishing of the countersinks. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/434126fd0025db658a0dda84481b568837901bdde82a5a20c2521886b80ba02e.jpg

        • David Bredan

          The anglage is nicer for sure, but the Geneva stripes appear more different because of how the photo was taken and not because how differently they are executed (in fact, deep grooves on Geneva Stripes are not preferable, so the GS version will appear as smooth as the non-GS one), and the countersinks are polished on both.

          • A_watches

            Us watch enthusiasts love the minute detail!..the French calls people who love detail as those that “like to make love to ants”…

        • ??????

          The finishing is almost identical, where this “almost” will remind you every day that there is same model, but better.

        • I’m not sure what the differences are really. I bet the finishes would look identical if the photos would be taken from the same angle and at the exact same settings with the same focal length lens.

          • Marius

            There are two big differences:

            1. Geneva Seal standards stipulate that all the parts — even those that are not visible– receive a high-end decoration. The non-Geneva Seal movement has a very nice display back, but I’m sure that the parts that lay beneath the top bridges are not as nicely finished.

            2. The new requirements of the Geneva Seal take into consideration the entire watch. This means that besides a high-end movement, a GS watch needs to also have a very high quality case and dial.

          • This is an interesting discussion, but those differences are not big.

            First, finishing to Geneva Seal levels on every single part would have been particularly important when production and build processes created burrs and other sorts of contaminants to the operation of the movement. Today, this level of operationally effective finishing is virtually universal in Switzerland. Any finish above a 4130 for example, which is hardly a looker, is completely superfluous – it’s eye candy. Eye candy that is not visible to the eye is like candy down the side of the couch. Most components, such as wheels, are usually still visible and most modern watches would conform to a degree. Some might not chamfer the spokes, but with the cal 3.96 I believe they use the same wheels.

            Second, I am not even convinced that there is an objective and measurable requirement on cases and dials in terms of The Geneva Seal. My understanding is that this topic is one of several reasons for brands like Patek developing their own seal that extends beyond the movement and to the case and dial.

          • Agreed, but the images used to illustrate the differences do not show any differences, which was the point I was trying to make 🙂

    • The Bathyscape is an alternative to this??

  • Raymond Wilkie

    i feel a migraine coming on.

  • Just lovely. Might prefer slightly thinner city band to allow slightly larger time dial and hands..

  • Beefalope

    Legibility isn’t great, but that’s overrated anyway. The finishing on the watches looks excellent. I like what the brand is doing these days.

  • The steel version with orange accents is particularly handsome. Priced for about 3 grand less would be even better 🙂

  • srs144

    Absolutely love the dial on the platinum one. The orange hues on the steel on kill it for me

  • Goodguy678

    Really nice watch but I rather they had not made the steel version at all because it is so ugly and the orange just makes it look cheap

  • Larry Holmack

    Just too cluttered in my opinion. When your smart phone will change time zones when you reach your destination….why bother with this watch? Strap your normal watch on your arm and change it when you reach your destination. Heck…even when I traveled a lot for work…I never bothered with something like this. I’d just wait until I reached my destination and changed the time on my watch in the airport…I mean….there are clocks every where in most airports!

    • I actually find that the dual timer is the ideal traveller’s watch, and the WT is for the guy who stays put but needs to regularly refer to different timezones without adjusting the watch. I have at times been one of those guys, and I find the google/iphone option to be extremely accurate but very annoying!

  • mtnsicl

    Very classy and very nice looking watches!!!

  • SuperStrapper

    I would never consider a each like this at any price, regardless of brand. I just can’t get into a design like this, that serves mainly to point out disproportion. The world cities ring is the same hue as the time dial, and with the hands sized for the time only it just looks so silly. If there was a contrast from time and city portions of the dial it would help, but it’s just always going to look so awkward. Do not want.

    • IG

      Well, living in your mom’s basement you don’t really need a watch like this either. It’s for travelers as the name says.

      • SuperStrapper

        T took you 5 days to come u with that? Sad.

        But, I guess if you’re a whiney drippy cunt that can’t see past anything that using manually wound, it’s basically predetermined tht you have the imagination of a carpenter ant.

  • egznyc

    They have their flaws, which others have mentioned here, but they do look quite pretty. The orange on the steel version looks fantastic, yet it’s still well above my budgetary constraints. Not sure the platinum version’s price can’t be justified even by current price-gouging standards.

  • Arnold

    I love the steel version. Nice color combination and overall a balanced dial to my eyes.

    Whoever compares pieces like this to watches made by VC or Blancpain just did not understand how this industry functions. Behind those brands u have big groups helping to minimize risks and leveraging technical structures, man power etc. The independence of those brands is a hoax. That’s nothing bad, dont get me wrong, as a client u get more watch for your money, but by buying a Chopard or a Parmegiani for example we honor the efforts of the last remaining Independent watch brands. The other independent ones like AP gave up on watchmaking years ago…some APRP high end stuff, the rest is non existent or delayed for ever….AP chronograph somebody?

  • BNABOD

    Certainly well made nice movement but decoration wise nothing to kill over. This type of watch is usually cluttered and the Luc is no exception here. Second hand you might get a great deal on those since resale will one get hammered.

  • james

    Sorry but that dial is a mess. Probably one too many complication. JLC and PP are much more legible and pretty

  • cluedog12

    I prefer the lighter dial of the rose gold version over the darker dials of the steel and platinum versions. The pointer date is a nice touch, but the dial is a bit too busy for the bleary eyes of a world traveler. Overall, a good contemporary take on the world-timer complication.

  • benjameshodges

    It looks about 55mm on your wrist!

  • I haven’t read all the comments below but somehow I suspect there HAS to be a T-Rex reference somewhere.

  • Drop files here or
    Accepted file types: jpg, png.