Originally founded in 1924, Delma has a long history of producing timepieces specifically designed for aquatic use, and the brand’s very first dive watch made its inaugural appearance way back in 1969. The latest release from Delma continues the company’s underwater legacy and it reimagines the Quattro, which was originally a quartz powered dive watch that was popular among scuba divers in the United States during the early 1980s. With that in mind, the new Delma Quattro marks a significant departure from the original. The updated model takes the form of a purpose built dive watch that is powered by an automatic movement, and includes a number of unique features that are specifically designed for professional diving and a life spent deep below the surface of the ocean.

Crafted from stainless steel and measuring 44mm in diameter by 15.3mm-thick, the case of the Delma Quattro is easily the watch’s single most defining feature. The overall profile follows a round and completely symmetrical design that extends to fully encompass both the helium escape valve and the screw-down winding crown that are located on opposite sides of the case. Since the crown itself sits almost flush with the case when it is completely screwed down, its tip features a small notch, which allows it to be unscrewed using either your fingers, a coin, or a special tool that is included with the watch. Fitted to the top of the case is a large and distinct unidirectional rotating timing bezel that includes the option of either a stainless steel or black DLC insert, along with six prominent tabs protruding from its sloped outer edge that are designed to offer an easy grip, regardless of whether you have wet hands or are wearing thick gloves. Protecting the dial is a sapphire crystal, while a screw-down display caseback helps provide the Delma Quattro with a generous 500 meters of water resistance.

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Although its overall shape and design are certainly unique, the most unusual aspect of the Delma Quattro’s case is the brand’s Rapid Bracelet Exchange System (RBES), which features a bayonet-style locking mechanism that allows for tool-free changes between different types of mounting options. Not only does it permit users to instantaneously swap between the brushed stainless steel bracelet and the included rubber strap, but it also enables the circular watch head to be unclipped from its lugs and attached to a custom aluminum decompression plate that includes comprehensive tables that outline all of the necessary decompression stops for use while scuba diving. A small lever located on the side of the case at the 8 o’clock location releases the latching mechanism, and rotating the case by approximately 30 degrees allows you to clip or unclip the watch case into either its lug mounting structure or decompression plate.

While the case of the Delma Quattro is thoroughly unconventional, its dial layout follows a much more traditional overall design. Color options include black, blue, or orange, and all three variations include rounded hour markers finished with Super-LumiNova C5, along with a date window at the 3 o’clock location. Additionally, all three versions also feature the same handset, which includes a white colored hour hand paired with a minute hand and lollipop-style seconds hand that are finished orange for additional at-a-glance legibility. Just like the hour markers, all three of the centrally-mounted hands, along with the markings on the bezel insert, are finished with Super-LumiNova C5 to provide the watch with a brightly glowing display in low-light conditions.

Powering the Delma Quattro is the venerable Sellita SW200-1 self-winding movement. Virtually identical to the ubiquitous ETA 2824, the Sellita SW200 is very much a known quantity, and it is arguably the single most common mechanical movement used throughout the Swiss watch industry. Running at a frequency of 28,800vph with a power reserve of approximately 38 hours, the SW200 isn’t going to win any awards for mind-blowing specifications; however, pushing the boundaries of performance really isn’t the primary goal of this workhorse automatic movement. Reliable, affordable, and easily serviced by virtually any half-decent watchmaker in the world, the Sellita SW200-1 is an appropriate choice for a purpose-built tool watch. The version fitted to the Delma Quattro features a gold finished rotor with the brand’s logo, while the entire movement remains visible through the watch’s screwdown display caseback.

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Dive watches are easily one of the most popular types of timepieces among today’s collectors and enthusiasts, yet many of the options available all offer very similar overall designs. While materials have improved and aesthetic details have been updated, most of the divers on the market today still follow a similar core blueprint that has been around for more than half a century. With that in mind, the Delma Quattro offers something truly different from the mid-century dive watch, while still retaining all of the hallmark features that define this fan-favorite category of timepieces. Produced as a limited edition of 999 pieces worldwide, the Delma Quattro is accompanied by an official retail price of $2,390 USD, and each watch comes with both rubber strap and bracelet options, along with the alternate decompression plate and a special box with a blue leather pouch to store all of the watch’s accompanying accessories. For more information, please visit the brand’s website


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