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Oliver Smith Makes Rare Officine Panerai Watches Available To The Public

Oliver Smith Makes Rare Officine Panerai Watches Available To The Public Announcements Sales & Auctions

Oliver Smith Jeweler is a well-known name in the Southwest. As a Scottsdale, AZ institution, the jeweler established its reputation over four decades, thanks to an expertly curated selection of goods, its own jewelry line, and an experienced watch repair team. Such a standing in the Arizona community underpins the reason Oliver Smith Jeweler is the only place in the state that one can find Panerai, Buccellati, Hermès, A. Lange & Söhne, Jaeger-LeCoultre, Bremont, and Blancpain. An expansion into Colorado came on the back of this success, when Oliver Smith opened the official Panerai Aspen Boutique a couple of years back. Now, after establishing a loyal client base in the new area, Oliver Smith is opening a separate showroom above the existing Panerai boutique where rare and historical pieces can be displayed for the public.

Oliver Smith Makes Rare Officine Panerai Watches Available To The Public Announcements Sales & Auctions

The newest branch of the business is run by Smith’s daughter Elizabeth and will present customers with a unique environment. Not only does the mountainous setting create a remarkable ambiance, but so too will the products play their part, with many of the timepieces for sale significant vintage entries from Panerai’s history. Part store, part museum, the vintage Panerai showroom is built around Smith’s personal reputation as a buyer and seller of classic vintage timepieces.

Oliver Smith Makes Rare Officine Panerai Watches Available To The Public Announcements Sales & Auctions

Part of the pleasure of visiting this new addition to the official boutique is learning about the personal histories of the watches available to purchase. Many of the watches present have seen real military action, with famous models such as the “3646 anonymous dial” having spent time on the wrist of a combat diver during World War II. Handling pieces of such historical importance is a job for an experienced team whose responsibility it is to ensure not only the safety and upkeep of the timepiece in question, but also to guarantee that its legacy is effectively communicated and that the truth behind its existence is passed on to the next owner. Preserving such characterful background is essential for the industry, and Smith, who has a 20-year long relationship with Panerai, is the man to do it.

Oliver Smith Makes Rare Officine Panerai Watches Available To The Public Announcements Sales & Auctions

“No one in the United States specializes in estate Panerai watches like we do,” says Oliver Smith. “Each piece in the selection has been thoroughly researched and handpicked specifically for its aesthetics, history, and significance within the Panerai universe. We spend time analyzing every historic Panerai watch — if you’re buying vintage you need to know provenance. Dials, movements, crowns, and casebacks all add to the history of each watch.”

Oliver Smith Makes Rare Officine Panerai Watches Available To The Public Announcements Sales & Auctions

Smith has long understood the many sales arguments that exist for a luxury watch, be they grounded in horological history, personal provenance, or mainstream fashion trends. As such, his relationship with Panerai has prospered since the late ’90s after he became one of the very first dealers in the United States.

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Oliver Smith Makes Rare Officine Panerai Watches Available To The Public Announcements Sales & Auctions

With such experience with the brand, Smith predicts the current collectors’ obsession with pieces from the ‘70s and ‘80s will soon shift to the 90s, when Panerai production spiked. His team is planning for the future when it comes to the acquisitions they make.

Oliver Smith Makes Rare Officine Panerai Watches Available To The Public Announcements Sales & Auctions

“The Oliver Smith team takes great pride in our estate watch acquisitions and in representing the Panerai brand. We want clients to feel comfortable in coming to us for guidance and selection,” says Smith, nodding towards the importance of placing before an interested public not only what was and what is interesting to them, but what the experts have an inkling might be the next big thing.

Oliver Smith Makes Rare Officine Panerai Watches Available To The Public Announcements Sales & Auctions

These exceptional models of rich history will be showcased on the second floor of the boutique in Aspen and in the Oliver Smith store in Scottsdale. Watch pricing and availability will be offered upon request. To learn more, please visit oliversmithjeweler.com.

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  • ray h.

    Looks like even the high end collectors are dumping Panerai. This brand is a mess.

  • Raymond Wilkie

    I’ve never seen the attraction.

    • Mikita

      Raimondo De Wilkone from the parallel italian universe loves them 🙂

      • Raymond Wilkie

        This Mr De Wilkone has very dubious tastes.

  • Matt T

    Amazing, beautiful pieces!

  • Lincolnshire Poacher

    I can understand the attraction of a being the proud owner of family heirloom that was worn or earned during combat; watches or medals, for example.
    I can also see the importance of collecting timepieces that were produced and worn by combatants, and displaying them in sympathetic and suitable museums where the context is emphasised.
    But I’m sorry I find everything else ghoulish.
    I do like the Radiomir style, but only if it were to exist in a 42mm or smaller size.

    • Rob Crenshaw

      Ditto, but I wouldn’t personally say ghoulish, because the person who owned the watch may still be alive. I just don’t like the concept of wearing someone else’s unknown history and memories. If that history is personal, say a family member, and there are real personal memories attached to the watch, then fine. Or if the owner were a known (whoever), and the watch is in a museum or personal collection for such things, then fine.

      But this current trend of vintage, in which heavy wear, discoloration, and sun damage are revered and desired, is baffling to me. It’s not a case of “they don’t make ’em like they used to”, because they make them *much better* than they used to. I see it as a younger generations’ lack of patience, desultory nature, and desire for instant gratification. The reason vintage watches are beat up is because the owner generally wore it as their only watch, in an era in which it was the only way to know the time. This generation has no need for a watch, so the desire for one has invented its own reasons for being, and one of those is to pay too much attention and attach too much importance to the way the watch has aged, which has become its own hobby. That’s fine and dandy, but I wouldn’t pay extra for it, in fact I’d want a severe discount. No one would have a used car (or house) inspected and offer to pay extra for faded paint, rust, dents and scratches, they’d want the cost of refurbishment deducted from the sales price. I cannot begin to understand why this thinking does not apply to watches.

      I view vintage watches like digging through garbage to find food, and rejoicing that one found juice only 10 years expired, while the Hungry Man Frozen Dinner met its demise 25 years ago. And then happily paying extra money for this bountiful repast, instead of just eating fresh food at a restaurant.

  • Mikita

    I must say that in person Panerai watches are more easy to get and digest, why so huge, why macho bravado, etc. I came a long way to appreciating them as they are; now I don’t feel the need to “shrink” them 🙂

  • Jose Pereztroika

    That 3646 with 4-liner dial and Angelus 240 movement is a mess. Pass!

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