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Oris Regulateur ‘Der Meistertaucher’ Watch Review

Oris Regulateur 'Der Meistertaucher' Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

Sit down and have a serious discussion with any budding watch collector and you can probably bet that at some point, the two of you will eventually land on the topic of dive watches. There's no way around it – we're crazy about them, obsessed with the durability, and in some cases, I've seen folks collect hundreds of them, if not more. But that can get, boring, right? After Oris announced the recently redesigned Oris Regulateur 'Der Meistertaucher' in 2017, I had been feeling a bit of dive watch-fatigue, especially after carefully reviewing my own personal collection. However, after learning more about its regulator layout and the fact that Oris was actually the first to develop a regulator-based dive watch back in 1999, I knew I had to give it a shot. The result was some time well-spent with a watch that not only taught me the importance of basic day-to-day utility, but also uncovered some new personal watch collecting preferences, which I'm constantly discovering as a growing watch enthusiast.

Oris Regulateur 'Der Meistertaucher' Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

Privately held and founded in 1904, Oris is still "the little guy" in the grand scheme of things. But I almost wouldn't have it any other way and to me, there's a certain sense of respectable charm in what they do. Even after reviewing their most recent releases, it feels like I'm rooting for my favorite indie band that still insists on ditching the tour bus in favor of the 15-passenger van – the brand does its own thing and I think many would agree that they have something for everyone. Pair that with their frequent charitable ocean conservation efforts like the Oris Hammerhead Limited Edition or the recent Oris Aquis Clipperton Limited Edition and you have a brand that's going to grab my attention almost every time.

Oris Regulateur 'Der Meistertaucher' Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

Even without taking the specifics into consideration, the Oris Regulateur 'Der Meistertaucher' is just a fun watch. The bright colors and the sense of discovery one feels when adjusting to the regulator display make for a great experience no matter what kind of collecting you're into. Because I knew the watch was already capable of surviving a dive expedition to one of the world's most remote coral atolls in the eastern Pacific, I figured I'd put it through more of a landlubber's test and take it on a few trails here in Washington. Unsurprisingly, the watch took everything I threw at it. So let's get down to business and have a closer look.

Oris Regulateur 'Der Meistertaucher' Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

Case

Not unlike their most popular models, the Oris Regulateur 'Der Meistertaucher' retains the same Aquis case shape in a very comfortable 43.5mm case diameter. The case itself is made entirely out of titanium, which also led me to experience somewhat of an adjustment period since I'm not really used to its lightweight nature. Nevertheless, the weight, or lack thereof, never left me questioning the watch's quality. It's simply a matter of comfort and when you pair the watch with the rubber strap like I did, you can just totally forget the Oris is even there. I know people have waxed poetic about this kind of stuff before, but I feel like this combination automatically qualifies the Regulateur as a perfect "vacation watch."

Oris Regulateur 'Der Meistertaucher' Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

Oris Regulateur 'Der Meistertaucher' Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

The bezel – with its matte black ceramic insert – sits flush with the case. It's pleasantly tactile, accurate, and doesn't protrude over the case too much like some other dive watches. Once again, this is a key component that works with the regulator readout and when you combine the two, the watch serves as a practical and very legible tool that measures elapsed time – but we'll get to that later. Other features include a screw-down crown (supports the 300m of water resistance), sloped lugs that integrate beautifully with the rubber strap, a screw-down caseback, and an automatic helium-release valve built into the side at 9 o'clock. My only gripe here is how easily the titanium can scratch, but that's to be expected and part of the trade-off when you reach for an all-titanium watch.

Oris Regulateur 'Der Meistertaucher' Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

Dial

Here's where things get fun after training your brain to read the regulator display. The dial itself is deep black with faceted indices that give off a nice, glitzy effect whenever light bounces off of them. That's pretty much the only element of flash you'll find in this watch but it's also important to familiarize yourself with the layout, which centers around two prominent sub-dials. At 3 o'clock, you'll find the sub-dial for hours and at 9 o'clock you have the running seconds – simple enough. The large, central red hand then indicates the minutes. One of the nicest details here is the matte black treatment given to the inner portion of the minute hand, which makes it appear as if the hand is floating just over the dial. Once you get a sense of where to find the hours, it's basically just like telling time on a traditional analog display.

Oris Regulateur 'Der Meistertaucher' Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

Oris Regulateur 'Der Meistertaucher' Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

While the regulator display is easy to get used to, I found one issue that bugged me. There will be times throughout the day – say 10:15 or so – when the massive minute hand will completely cover the small hour hand in its sub-dial – or at least what it's pointing to. As a result, it can be difficult to quickly get an accurate readout of the time. But, that isn't really the Regulateur's forte and the point here is to provide the wearer with a fast way to track elapsed minutes. If you think about it, you have to wonder why more brands haven't tried executing this in their dive watches. Then again, I feel that a dive watch's true utility in the field can still be up for debate – but I'll leave that up to the dive experts to decide. Otherwise, Oris did a great job in terms of symmetry and I'm grateful for the minimal and well-integrated date window at 6 o'clock. Lume is also sufficient and the cool, aqua shade of BGW9 is a real treat when you manage to catch it against the strap's hot red tone.

About the Author

Michael is a Seattle-based writer who first became interested in watches during his grade school years. He has a penchant for design, aviation, music, and anything sci-fi or gear related. When he’s not writing about watches or contributing to a number of other projects, he enjoys catching up on his favorite books, tinkering with guitars, and exploring the trails of Washington—with a watch on his wrist, of course.
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  • I want it! (7)
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Comments

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  • IG

    Regulateur layout makes perfect sense for diving watches.

  • Raymond Wilkie

    Ok Raymond, it’s time to stop being a stick in the mud and get with the programme. Rubber in its various colours are here to stay. As we say here ” Build a bridge and get over it! ”
    Like you Micheal I tended to shy away from bright colours and was quite conservative about what I wore but that red does look pretty good on this piece ( the smell i”m not to sure about ) It’s spooky, I had to look back to see the date window, I hadn’t even noticed it!
    I love the way they have presented the dial, that floating minute hand it’s really lovely. Must be nice watching it tick away. Really nice size also.and fantastic lume. I haven’t been scuba diving since I was bitten by a parrot fish in the Red Sea about 10 yr ago so I wouldn’t be putting it through it paces.
    Oris has alays meant quality for me.
    This would definatly be in my collection.

    • Dongo

      …. birdie num num

  • PollyO

    ”As a result, it can be difficult to quickly get an accurate readout of the time.” ….. This particular characteristic is always a bit of a deal breaker for me. Especially in a watch. But still, as a professional desk diver, this is a pretty good looking piece of kit. I really like Oris and my affection keeps on growing.

  • ProJ

    Firstly, thanks ABTW for listening to us readers and including case dimensions (thickness and lug-to-lug) in the summary.

    In my opinion, the regulator design doesn’t match very well with a diver’s watch, or that it at least needs sometime getting used to. The minute hand may entirely cover the hour as has been rightfully pointed out by the reveiwer. This disadvantage is a deal breaker for me.

    I am guessing the potential buyer of this watch is someone who is in the market primarily looking for a regulator.

    • Raymond Wilkie

      I think that a blog such as this can really only tell you so mutch about a watch / timepiece. Natural curiosity would have me look at other sites ( which I won’t advertise) or the homepage of the watch itself if you wished a greater understanding ……but that’s just me.

      • ProJ

        If I were still interested in such watch after reading this review, my natural curiosity would take me to an AD to try the watch on.

        Case in point is ABTW reviews are just as good as your ‘other sites’ if not better.

        • Raymond Wilkie

          That fact was never in disopute.

    • I think this layout works well for actual diving (which is typically for less than an hour) but less well for other uses. I wish the hour and seconds subdials were the same size though.

      • ProJ

        Yup good points Mark

    • IG

      You are clueless about diving.

  • Jon Heinz

    No way is that the actual street price. Still, it’s titanium and I miss my old Ti small-seconds sometimes. So comfy. And, Gas Gas Bones makes straps that will fit that narrow lug width, handy info which might push someone giving pause due to that quirk over the threshold to push the button on one. Probably good that I wasn’t in the market when this one dropped; I’d be considerably lighter in the wallet I reckon.

  • SuperStrapper

    I will just never appreciate this lug structure. It just looks so underperformed that so little ofbthe strap is actually attached to the watch.

  • It is 1200 Ok not 3150 Ok. Lose the red markers on the bezel(should be white)Looks tacky.

  • Bobby Peruse

    Oris consistently makes the best sub-$4k watches in Switzerland. Nobody does it half as good as Oris.

    • DanW94

      Makes me feel sad for the rest…

  • R Ramki

    Grade 2 or Grade 5 Titanium? I’m a tad surprised by the “easier to scratch titanium” viewpoint in the article

    • SuperStrapper

      Can tell just by the colour it’s g5

  • Pete L

    Great value and quality with the something a bit different. Nice splash of colour too!

  • Juan-Antonio Garcia

    Love it, excellent variation on the diver theme. Cant stop looking at the minute hand, very nice.

  • Sam Anderson

    Having recently owned the Oris Aquis Date and worn it extensively on holiday in Thailand, I can say that this brand is pure quality for the price. The reason i sold it was that it was a bit heavy for my liking. Which makes the titanium offering very attractive indeed.

    The rubber strap is amazing but I disagree about the piece that folds underneath. It makes the clasp almost too high. It would be fine in the ocean, but for desk work the whole clasp is just too large. I agree that no one wants to cut their straps. But if brands released replacement straps at a reasonable price–like around $100–then we’d have no problem cutting a strap to size, and then buying a new replacement should we want to sell it in the future. The prices of replacement straps is criminal.

  • What an ugly Festina.

  • benjameshodges

    I love the look but my only gripe would be that the hour hand is not instantaneous.

  • BNABOD

    Always liked this one, just a fun watch to wear the price in my book is a tad too high (but I usually say it is too high for a basic caliber) . While the shell looks cool, a 3k price tag for 38 hour of PR is pretty lame especially since Oris has some kick a$$ calibers that could last 10 days. Surprise me Oris, same watch in 40-41mm w the new 10 day movement (assuming it would fit which it might not). either way I like the new aquis date in green.
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/78bbdd8fc0704ea0287cb8b3ac2937e668c5495c191a69c4f8cc03829e6e236f.png

  • ???? ????????

    Why they do not use scratch resistant treatment on titanium of their watches. I have two titanium watches. Both are Citizen. The Promaster chronograph is from more than 10 years ago without Duratec which is easily scratch. Compare to my new Attesa satellite air wave which is super titanium Duratec body and bracelet that much more durable. Very very nice technology and I think this is the right answer to the watch lover like me. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/0ed2b7d03ea4d87582788ddcf89e9b0d2655c7e36191e65bf236f1db7553913b.jpg