Tudor Heritage Black Bay Watch With In-House Movement Hands-On

Tudor Heritage Black Bay Watch With In-House Movement Hands-On

Tudor Heritage Black Bay Watch With In-House Movement Hands-On Hands-On

It might be the year of the Monkey, but it might as well be the year of the Tudor Black Bay. Sure, we're only five months on the heels of the introduction of the Black Bay Black, but with three fresh updates and three brand-new additions to the line (five of which house Tudor’s in-house movement), there’s now almost something for every type of collector, without ever having to leave the ‘Bay. Those options include a surprising 36mm dress-diver, a stealthy PVD-coated edition, and an all-new case and design hewn from bronze – the latter of which has dominated much of the Baselworld buzz (no thanks in part to a timely catalog "leak" on Instagram 48 hours prior to its unveiling). However, the original three Tudor Heritage Black Bays – Red, Blue, and Black, all take on the new Tudor in-house caliber and a few other subtle updates, making the Tudor Heritage Black Bay, once again, the dive watch to own this summer.

Tudor Heritage Black Bay Watch With In-House Movement Hands-On Hands-On

The Tudor Heritage Black Bay is one of those rare watches that hasn’t just been accumulating accolades since its release in 2012, it’s a watch that has also won a proud slot in the rotation of an unusually wide variety of collections – as a top-end piece for budget-minded collectors, and as a classic, everyday wearable in the collections of guys who otherwise only bother to chase the super-rare. Why? Well, for starters, the Tudor Heritage Black Bay comes from a good lineage – the 7922 launched in 1954, to be precise. It’s also handsome, colorful (but not overly so), neatly proportioned, detail-rich, and exceptionally well-built. Case in point: the bezel that’s been rumored to have been finely tuned to mimic the tactile feel of opening the combination lock on a certain Swiss bank vault. However, whether it’s true or not is secondary to the fact that the details will always matter, and it’s through these details that Tudor has eclipsed the wildly popular retro trend and turned the Heritage collection into an annual clinic on modern watch design.

Tudor Heritage Black Bay Watch With In-House Movement Hands-On Hands-On

Tudor Heritage Black Bay Watch With In-House Movement Hands-On Hands-On

With the tool diver Pelagos getting the in-house upgrade for Basel last year, it was inevitable that the Tudor Heritage Black Bay get the same treatment. And as if on cue, the entire Tudor Heritage Black Bay line (with the exception of the 36mm) this year gets Tudor's in-house MT5602 movement – a 4Hz (28,000vph), COSC-certified automatic caliber with a bi-directional winding system and around 70 hours of power reserve. Naturally, the added chronometer accuracy certification and the anti-magnetic silicon hairspring are both welcome additions, but it’s the 70-hour reserve that most will find particularly useful, especially compared to the typical 40 found in a comparable ETA movement. With the new Tudor movements, you can set the watch down on Friday afternoon, and pick it up Monday morning without missing a beat. To wit: the original two-line Pelagos with its ETA 2824 gets around 38 hours, meaning if it’s not fully wound when set it down Friday night, it might not be running by the time Sunday brunch rolls around.

Tudor Heritage Black Bay Watch With In-House Movement Hands-On Hands-On

Tudor Heritage Black Bay Watch With In-House Movement Hands-On Hands-On

The Tudor Heritage Black Bay's movement upgrade came accompanied by a few other subtleties which genuinely improve the dial layout and presentation. Gone is the curved text at 6:00 and the vintage rose at 12:00 in place of three straightened lines of text and the Tudor shield. Both are details that quietly modernize the dial, eliminating those last few shades of retro-kitsch to bring it more closely in-line with a modern collection of classically inspired dive watches.

Tudor Heritage Black Bay Watch With In-House Movement Hands-On Hands-On

Tudor Heritage Black Bay Watch With In-House Movement Hands-On Hands-On

However, one of the coolest additions to the Tudor Heritage Black Bay package is its new riveted bracelet, which, at first glance, doesn’t appear dramatically different from the outgoing version. And yet, it's a neat homage to the pioneering era of dive watches whose bracelets were designed around a stepped construction for comfort and durability, and held together by riveted screws, which you can see on the 9:00 case side of the Tudor Heritage Black Bay’s new bracelet. It’s a very cool detail that doesn’t add any performance or comfort benefit to the watch overall, but one that just illustrates Tudor’s commitment to paying homage to the era that bore the watch.

Tudor Heritage Black Bay Watch With In-House Movement Hands-On Hands-On

Tudor Heritage Black Bay Watch With In-House Movement Hands-On Hands-On

As before, those who opt out of the bracelet can get the Tudor Heritage Black Bay on a distressed leather strap with a deployant clasp – a look that very few dive watches can pull off, but one that the Tudor Heritage Black Bay’s satin-polished case, warm, gilt dial tones, and colorful accents are able to manage with aplomb. However, if neither leather nor steel is the look you’re chasing, Tudor supplies each variant with an extra fabric strap that’s been color-matched to the watch. Obviously, being from Tudor’s detail-rich Heritage collection, these straps are a story in and of themselves – particularly how each impressively well-made strap is jacquard-woven on looms by a century-old family business in the St-Etienne region of France.

Tudor Heritage Black Bay Watch With In-House Movement Hands-On Hands-On

Tudor Heritage Black Bay Watch With In-House Movement Hands-On Hands-On

The new straight-line Tudor Heritage Black Bay doesn’t wear any differently than its predecessors, and that’s probably a good thing – especially since our very own James Stacey suggested its design and dimensions yielded "one of the most appealing watches on the market today." The 41mm case is probably best suited for a flatter wrist profile, but it's otherwise very nicely proportioned. That said, it is worth noting that on some wrists, the watch can wear a touch large, given its tall 12mm silhouette, and long 50mm lug-to-lug length. There's also not a great deal of taper from the 9:00 and 3:00 edges of the case to the lugs – and while this speaks more to the vintage-inspired case design, it also lends the watch a semi-rectangular shape that can take a little getting used to.

Tudor Heritage Black Bay Watch With In-House Movement Hands-On Hands-On

Collectors can expect retailers to start replacing all current variants of the Tudor Heritage Black Bay with the in-house editions very soon. Price is raised a bit from the outgoing model to $3,675 on the bracelet and $3,550 on the strap. tudorwatch.com

What do you think?
  • I want it! (43)
  • I love it! (16)
  • Thumbs up (7)
  • Interesting (2)
  • Classy (1)
  • A_watches

    Fantastic, this is a sub beater I think.

  • Nicholas E.

    Shame that got rid of the rose on the dial. Such a beautiful detail. Still, this ranks way higher on my radar than almost any other dive watch in any price range. The burgundy is nearly flawless.

  • Luciano

    Great watch at a good price. However, I’m not sure if all readers will agree with the following paragraph from the article:
    “The Tudor Heritage Black Bay’s movement upgrade came accompanied by a few other subtleties which genuinely improve the dial layout and presentation. Gone is the curved text at 6:00 and the vintage rose at 12:00 in place of three straightened lines of text and the Tudor shield. Both are details that quietly modernize the dial, eliminating those last few shades of retro-kitsch to bring it more closely in-line with a modern collection of classically inspired dive watches.”

    • error406

      The “retro-kitsch” dig is a bit of the mark considering the introduction of the faux riveted bracelet.

      That’s more retro-kitsch than the writing on the dial.

      • IVA the LT

        Took the words out of my mouth.

  • laup nomis

    The domed glass is great, the bezel colours are rich toned and not wishy-washy like many coloured diver bezels. 41mm is a nice size for most people ( sport watch wise). All in all I’m sure they’ve been getting top marks from teacher in their home-work, because its eminently wearable.

  • MEddie90

    Stunning in the blue and glad the got rid of the essay at the 6:00 position. The deep blue and burgundy tones are beautiful and the dial, hands and case are to die for though I’m still not sure about the inhouse movement. One of the main perks of Tudor imho is the fact your getting a Rolex quality case with a workhorse ETA you can easily get serviced locally.

    Its nice to see Rolex have a more creative (visually at least) outlet they can use to explore outside of their normal age old designs which seem to progress at a glacial rate.

  • Raymond Wilkie

    Save a few more cents and buy a Rolex .

    • Brad

      That would be 382,500 cents more for a no date sub.

      • Raymond Wilkie

        Totally worth it.

  • Orel Balahani

    Tudor is big boi now

  • iamcalledryan

    Lush. Great look, and a great price for in house. Blue for me.

  • Love the retro riveted bracelet. I wonder if it is actually constructed in that manner, or just meant to look like it is.

  • Josh Graves

    I like it, but I wish there was less text on the dial. Their woven straps are amazing.

  • Marius

    From a value perspective, this watch is a good offering: attractive design, decent movement, and an acceptable brand name. However, from a branding and prestige perspective, this Tudor only tells me that its owner actually wanted a Rolex Submariner but couldn’t afford one. In fact, I know three persons who eventually sold their Black Bays to fund a Submariner.

    • Jon Andresen

      Most folks have not idea about Tudor. Rolex is the only meaningful brand name in high end watches, at least from the perspective of the masses. In my stable the BB and the sub are very different and complimentary. I’ve around 20 dive watches and all different and valid in their niche. Anyone who really wants a sub but buys a BB is in for disappointment. Nobody will recognize their watch and if brand matters to them they will always want the other.

      • egznyc

        For some of us who are a little uncomfortable making a “statement,” however unintended, by wearing a brand recognized by a large percentage of people as a luxury product, the opportunity to fly a little under the radar is welcome. Particularly when we personally prefer the style (and pricing) of another brand that not everyone has heard of.

    • Guadzilla

      As snobby attitudes go, that statement fails quite spectacularly, given that a Rolex Sub is easily attainable for a vast majority of people if they put their minds to it – if that is what one buys for prestige, then it is a pretty low bar.

      • Marius

        Maybe in a dream world or a South American telenovela. A new no-date Submariner costs around $8,000. Are you telling me that most people could easily afford an $8,000 watch? Even pre-owned it will cost you at least $6,000. If this watch is a “pretty low bar,” what would a decent watch be? Maybe a Lange Datograph?

        • Guadzilla

          Yes, most middle-class or higher people in developed countries can easily afford to pay $8,000 on a watch if they really wanted to: what stops them isnt that they cannot, but they dont see the point to doing so.

          It isnt that much money, compared to how much people spend on houses, cars, vacations, education, etc.

          As an indicator of wealth, a Rolex is up there with a 3-series BMW: not really all that, in the grand scheme of things.

          • John Effing Zoidberg

            Didn’t Jeremy Clarkson say that Audis and Breitlings is where it’s at with the douchebag crew?

    • Timestandsstill

      Actually I would pick the burgundy BB over a sub any day and I can afford either. The Tudor oozes far more character than the ubiquitous Submariner and I would much rather be seen wearing ii

    • GatorWatch

      This has to be one of the inept and out of touch faux-elitist posts I’ve seen in a while. Perhaps the clearest example I could give someone like yourself is that John Mayer is a Tudor Black Bay black owner and wrote an article raving about it. Here is a quote from his article: “[T]here is nothing about this Tudor that couldn’t hold its own at a table of top-tier collectors. If you knew enough to choose this watch, you have telegraphed your appreciation of the art, and that’s all it takes to enter the conversation, as far as I’m concerned.”

      Marius, you have made it quite apparent from your post that you have no appreciation of that art and are overly concerned with the material status a watch conveys. Unfortunately, your notions are misplaced because like Guadzilla stated, the no date sub is actually quite affordable to people that covet them and are willing to save. That being said, I will gladly leave you to buy timekeeping jewelry. In turn I’ll keep my Black Bay and my Rolex Sea-dweller… but really all I wanted you to know is that having my Rolex only tells you that I actually wanted an AP Royal Oak Offshore Diver but couldn’t afford one.

      • Marius

        Well, if John Mayer i.e. the Millennium Falcon of watch experts likes Tudor, then what can I say? One simply has to like Tudor.
        Speaking of John Mayer and Tudor: have you noticed the massive amount of advertising space that Tudo bought on Hodinkee? Of course, I’m absolutely certain that this aspect wouldn’t alter their objectivity at all.

        To conclude, I will leave you enjoy the “art” of your Black Bay and Rolex Sea Dweller.

        • GatorWatch

          Let me spell it out for you. The John Mayer example is useful because his multi-million dollar net worth and preference for the Tudor Black Bay completely invalidate your entire premise stated above. And yeah, *rolls eyes* I’m sure the Tudor ads have really swayed his judgment. Think about the $100s? $1000s? of dollars he might have potentially made selling out his horological integrity to write that article. This will be my last reply, I have no patience for trolls and find it difficult to believe that you sincerely believe what you are writing.

  • DanW94

    Just a handsome watch. It’s a testament to it’s versatility the way it seamlessly moves between a bracelet, nylon or leather strap while managing to look perfectly comfortable on each. It’s not often you see a watch that retains it’s wearability in different environments like dress, sporty, casual etc…This one definitely could. Nice review, Zach.

  • Jon Andresen

    This is a nice watch or should I say stable of watches. This article, however, reads like an advertisement, which is not very informative, helpful, or welcome. Tell me something I can’t get from an official Tudor press release please. I have the original with red bezel, which is lovely, even my wife likes it. The new movement is intriguing but coming so soon on the heals of the first watch with ETA it is a little annoying. In many ways the new movement devalues my recent and expensive purchase. The watch also sits too high on the wrist, it’s a bit blocky, not vintage proportions. The new dial text is different, not better than the original and losing the Tudor rose is a bit sad. The riveted bracelet looks like a bit of an afterthought. Let’s see, modernize the movement, check. Modernize the dial text, check. Differentiate from the more vintage inspired original, almost…let’s bolt on some fake rivets to the same old bracelet (that lacks diver’s extension), great idea (not). I really like my BB but it’s not perfect, it’s not really a rock solid flawless functional divers watch (e.g. corrosion on the stem due to dissimilar metals and no drilled lugs for easy strap change). For a more harmonious and equally attractive watch check the new Oris Divers 65 in 42 mm. Tudor is great, but not the only folks doing the vintage thing and not always the best execution.

    • It IS an advertisement. Tudor pays watch blogs.

    • GatorWatch

      I agree wholeheartedly with what you’ve just said. One thing completely lacking in this article is any discussion of the new thickness of the watch. Because of the new movement, I’ve heard from multiple sources that this watch has grown another 1-2mm in height – mostly based on the caseback. I can tell the caseback was changed based on the pictures in this article but nothing was mentioned about this. I have an original Black Bay and it’s certainly not the slimmest watch. Another 1-2mm would be a serious con in my book proportion-wise and I would appreciate knowing about it when I read a multi hundred word article/ad on a new release.

  • Davy

    I’m possibly in a minority but for the life of me I really don’t understand the excitement and buzz around Tudor lately. I find them hugely uninteresting and fairly dull. They’re not ugly by any means but at the same time I see nothing new, interesting or unique here. I can only assume the excitement is because Rolex make them? In their price range I can think of numerous far more interesting and visually appealing watches.

    • Marius

      I think that the buzz and excitement are due to the big advertising spending that Tudor is pumping in watch blogs. For instance, Hodinkee is full with Tudor ads right, left and center.

      • TrevorXM

        Of course it is. The watch blog game is all about money when it comes to coverage these days. I can’t really blame them too much. They’re trying to make a living doing what they love, so if some watch company offers them big sponsorship, they’re going to take it and then hype the hell out of these watches in their review. Bremont, Tudor, and all the rest will get a massive push. Quieter companies who don’t advertise much will get very little coverage.

    • Larry Holmack

      I am right with you…I find it just as boring since now it looks like every other diver out there….because a rose is not just another rose in this case.

  • IVA the LT

    I personally went with the first-gen Black Bay Black to avoid the rivet bracelet and the shield on the dial (I like the rose).

  • Jackyl

    I donno the fuss about this model or Pelagos. Why people keeps on saying this is a poormans rolex!? First of all it is made by rolex second Pelagos/BB is cooler than sub third they have their own mvt now made by rolex aswell. So basically its up to you if you want the newest and the greatest or you want a classic one. Dont say that people who bought tudor cant afford rolex they are just wise. Just saying.

    • TrevorXM

      A poor man’s Rolex is a Steinhart at about $500. Not a $3,600 Tudor.

      • dennis

        Oh so true, the Steinhart ocean one is alot more bang for your buck
        than the Tudor as i’m wearing mine now.

        • Mike V

          Steinhart not even in the same league with quality badly lacking.

          • Chinginud

            You’re right it’s not in the same league, especially the titanium band on my Ocean One Ti, but the pelagos/black bay are not 7 times the quality. 3 times maybe. I’ll probably pick up the pelagos at some point if the movement proves reliable.

      • dennis

        I was comparing a bang for the buck, not who is better. I’m a certified padi
        diver and instructor for over 30 yrs. I know more about dive watches and
        diving than you could possibly know. I have a tudor sub snowflake, rolex
        sub no date and many more in between. I actually have dove with all these
        watches, as a tool, what is your argument.

  • Jerry Davis

    I’ll take the red one please.

  • ZBT71

    Tudor, please bring back the rose.

    • Chaz

      Those have been consigned to “collectibility” status now and fanboys will be paying 3x the retail to get their hands on that discontinued dial.
      Even better if it’s damaged…err…patina’d.

      • IVA the LT

        Gosh…should I stop wearing mine then lol?

        It does remind me of the Longines Legends Diver. Release the cleaner no-date model, then quickly discontinue it.

  • TrevorXM

    I just find these watches really boring. It’s like the same old design brought out for the past sixty years that’s been copied and knocked off a hundred times by a hundred different watch companies. There’s just nothing to get excited about here. It isn’t a cool, unexpected retro design made new again like the Oris 65 line, for example. This Tudor is just the same old same old same old. It looks shabby and tired. Meanwhile, I do like Tudor’s North Flag model. That’s fresh and interesting.

    • Marius

      Also, don’t forget the new Damasko in-house movement, which is also a very capable caliber (silicon hairspring, ceramic ball bearings, etc.) for a lower price than Tudor. Another aspect that I don’t understand is the famed Rolex case quality. I mean, a lot of people seem to assume that just because Tudor is owned by Rolex, all Tudor cases and dials are manufactured by Rolex and are of the exact same quality as those used in Rolexes. In fact, this is one of Tudor`s main selling point: you get Rolex quality cases and a very dependable eta/in-house caliber. Yet, I have never actually heard Tudor confirm this.

      • TrevorXM

        Well, this whole “Rolex quality for less than Rolex money” is just a silly one. Then why buy a Rolex? So you can pay twice as much and get the Burger King crown prestige symbol on your watch? Of course there has to be a lot more to it than that? I do have respect for Rolex quality, and I’m sure the Tudor is a very good watch, but this whole Tudor hype game thing we’re all being subjected to is ridiculous.

        What these watch blogs should do — if they had any guts at all — would be to do a head to head comparison of quality between a Tudor Black Bay and a Rolex Submariner no date. Complete testing. Open the watches up, get a master watchmaker to take a detailed look at the movement. Everything. Then tell us why, exactly, a Rolex costs so much more.

        • Chaz

          Bring back Walt Odets!

          • TrevorXM

            I had to look up who that is. It’s hard to get links that work to his reviews but came across this one of an Explorer. http://www.timezone.com/2002/09/16/the-rolex-explorer-ref-14270-part-1/
            Yeah, he’d be the guy for a Tudor vs. Rolex no holds barred comparison. Quote from part 2 of the Explorer examination:

            “The watch represents an extremely poor value if purchased solely to provide accurate and reliable timekeeping. And it is of no horological interest whatsoever. The contrast between the relatively good external appearance of the watch and the internal appearance is absolutely unparalled in my experience. I cannot think of another consumer product in which the gulf between the publicly perceived quality and
            the reality I saw is as broad as with the Explorer.”

            Wow! And he backs it up with one brutal photo after another here in part 2 of the tear down:
            http://www.timezone.com/2002/09/16/the-rolex-explorer-ref-14270-part-2/

          • Marius

            Yes, Walt Odets is a real watch expert, one of the best. He also wrote some very interesting articles about the JLC 849 caliber, the Chopard ultra-thin caliber, etc. However, I can guarantee you that most watch blogs would never publish his work because that would be quite a shock for most readers who are used to reading reviews where all watches are great, fantastic and superb.

          • Chaz

            In those days there were pretty much only Rolex fanboys. That was before the word “fanboy”.
            Man, were their chaps burned on that Explorer review.

          • iamcalledryan

            I agree that a watch blog would struggle to publish those sorts of reviews regularly. Although Walt was highly knowledgeable, he was not a watchmaker, and prior to that review he had spent almost zero time with watches that were not made under Geneva seal-style criteria. The Explorer review was part objective, part his own personal shock as to how unfinished a ‘tool movement’ could be. Setting aside the danger of performing objective assessments using a sample size of one, I can think of no more satisfying reviews than the ones he wrote. I would imagine he would find a good home in the modern watch media today, which was barely in existence during his most active times, but he was chased out of horology. There are perfectly intelligent watchmakers or even articulate engineers in the press today. Nick Manousos writes great articles for Hodinkee, Jens Koch at Watchtime, some of the deeper Europastar reviews, there is more than enough objective and technical discussion going on, ABTW is just one outlet of many and it is not about in depth investigative assessments of movements. Again, you can’t help but have a crack at the enthusiasm of the readership here, which I find unnecessary to an otherwise interesting discussion.

          • John Effing Zoidberg

            And also with not very ugly hands and goofy crowns.

          • commentator bob

            Interesting to see an Explorer for $2,500 in 2002. Adjusted for inflation that is $3,339, The actual 2016 price is $6,550.

          • TrevorXM

            But don’t forget that the Swiss Franc is now worth a lot more against the US dollar compared to then. About 75 to 80% more. This accounts for most of that rise in price. Rolex makes watches in Switzerland of course, and sells them to the US market. So their prices, and all Swiss made watch prices, have to reflect that. And then there is the massive drain on all successful European countries with the taxation from the disaster which is the EU. There are lots of legitimate reasons why Swiss watches cost as much as they do. It’s not all gouging. If you look at the chart below, you can see why Swiss watches used to be so cheap. Imagine if it were still 3 francs to the dollar instead of near par like today.

          • ConElPueblo

            What is the relation between the EU and Switzerland in this case?

          • iamcalledryan

            The watch itself has also improved since the 14270, including a better movement than the one Walt ripped to shreds!

      • MEddie90

        In fairness classic tudors used Rolex cases to my knowledge, since they started producing their own designs however I’m not to sure exactly what their provenance is regarding case, dials etc. I have had my hands on some and they seem top shelf, certainly seem on par with their big brother as far as construction goes.

  • A_watches

    I actually quite like Tudor for the poor man’s Rolex jibe, takes thick skin to wear it, an admirable quality. I have a Rolex sub but can also admire Tudor. They are different these days in the past yes it seemed Tudor just mirrored Rolex. Now they are doing their own designs and I love the snowflake which is pure classic tudor. The blue with the blue leather and also the red NATO really nice aesthetic.

  • Bill W

    They should tweak the font of the numerals on the bezel a little more, get them a little further away from the Submariner.

  • commentator bob

    Anyone considering this should take a very close look at the Zodiac Sea Wolf 53 Skin Diver. A manufacture Swiss automatic watch with a better history (it came out in 1953, the same year as the Submariner), better design and much less kitsch for 1/3 the price.

  • cg

    Clones commanding this pricing is silly and an obvious slam on consumers. The guy that’ll sell you a used car would sell you one of these…. though the red is quite nice. Zodiac is a better choice.

  • Mr. Small Wrist

    I had one of the very first Black Bay Blue Tudor’s and it was lovely, except way too big for my wrist. I sold it and have a Heritage 36mm on order.

  • Mr. Small Wrist

    One more comment. My Black Bay had the Tudor modified ETA 2824. If one has the choice between an in-house movement or an ETA, one would choose the one made completely by the manufacturer. However, my watch was accurate to within 3 seconds fast per day with zero variance over the course of more than a year. I was pleased with this level of accuracy.

    • Ariel Adams

      It would be hard to argue that with Tudor’s tweaks the base ETA is a bad movement. Having an in-house movement just makes the Black Bay even more enthusiast-oriented.

  • Dinkee, H. O.

    41mm is a little too small for my full 5 1/4 inch wrist. However it doesn’t detract from this masterpiece of nuanced glory! It’s as if by some miracle, but the wizards at Tudor have made this watch a COMPLETELY new style never seen before. How did they do it?

  • I have the first iteration of the BB Black – and I chose it, knowing full well that the “improved” version was about to be released, for three very good reasons (well, good to me, anyway). Aesthetically, the rose dial fits more with the retro / heritage vibe of the watch than does the shield dial, which is just a little too Rolex-y for a watch that should (and does) stand on its own. (Although I must admit that the new dial pairs better with the more modern look of the blue-bezeled variant) And as a thousand other people before me have pointed out, an ETA movement can be serviced anywhere by a competent watchmaker. Or even swapped out if need be. And yes, given the short period in which they were available, the original dial BB will probably fetch more on the pre-owned market.

    I don’t have any immediate plans to sell it though; it’s really a fantastic watch. I’ve never thought of Tudor as a “poor man’s Rolex”. There’s nothing “Rolex” about the Heritage Chrono, for instance. Nor the Pelagos. In fact, with the exception of the new Explorer, Rolexes have become increasingly gaudy, fit only for the wrists of those who lack subtlety. Design-wise, Tudor is everything Rolex should have been.

    • David Capps

      Spot on bro and I couldn’t agree more!

  • ??????

    Rose logo and curved text gave the BB more vintage warmth, but it is still a handsome watch. Personally, I would prefer the older model.

  • funNactive

    Nice tool dive watch. Great that Tudor is going to In House movements for their watches.

    I think that the design of the Tudor Pelagos looks more consistent with the block hour indicators with the snowflake hands (snowflake being blocky clashes with round indices).

  • WatchHulk

    Hulk miss rose logo! Hulk regrets buying ETA version! Hulk SMASH!!!

  • egznyc

    Great looking watch, particularly in blue or burgundy. The size seems spot-on, too, for my preferences. And getting 70 hours of power reserve makes the in-house movement a great upgrade. One thing that surprised me a little was that in one photo the blue came with gold-colored hands while in the other photos it had silver-toned hands (and hour indices on both). Does Tudor offer each model in different “trims”?

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  • peter_byford

    Yes, I’m guilty of regarding a Tudor as a cheap man’s Rolex lol ! Having owned 4 Rolex in the past, I never thought I’d look at a Tudor, from any era, as a purchase, but I have to say that at the price point this is offered at, it has a lot going for it. The design is a freshener of an established one, & only from what I’ve read , the movement is worthy of note too. Hmmm…..yes, good luck to Tudor with their range…..I like them.

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  • Michael Xiao

    Nice finishing overall, but the in-house movement is very low-quality. The winding of my Tudor stopped working after a week.

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