Ateliers DeMonaco Tourbillon Carre And Ronde Watches Hands-On

Ateliers DeMonaco Tourbillon Carre And Ronde Watches Hands-On

Ateliers DeMonaco Tourbillon Carre And Ronde Watches Hands On   hands on

One of the more interesting and beautiful small production high-end watch brands from the last few years is Atelier DeMonaco. The exclusive luxury watch maker is based in Monaco, but is actually owned by Frederique Constant, and headed by their Dutch technical director and watchmaker Pim Koeslag. So in reality, DeMonaco is assembled in Monaco, logistically managed from Switzerland, and operated by the Dutch.

A few hallmarks of the brand are particularly interesting and they include use of modern materials such as sapphire bridges and silicon parts, beautiful hand-engraved elements such as the automatic rotors, and attractive yet contemporary designs. DeMonaco watches feel like a satisfying combination of both traditional watch making values but modern luxury sensibility. These watches aren't for everyone with their high-end positioning and exclusive production, but they should be on your horological radar.

Ateliers DeMonaco Tourbillon Carre And Ronde Watches Hands On   hands on

Ateliers DeMonaco Tourbillon Carre And Ronde Watches Hands On   hands on

Ateliers DeMonaco Tourbillon Carre And Ronde Watches Hands On   hands on

In this article you get to see a few pieces in the DeMonaco Tourbillon collection which includes both the Tourbillon Carre (square) and Tourbillon Ronde (round). Each of the case styles comes with a few dial options that includes both Arabic and Roman numerals or baton hour markers, as well as case materials in both 18k rose and white gold. The cases are further produced from two materials, which includes 18k gold on the outside, with a titanium inner case. This is done as a means to make the watch stronger and lighter, as the generous proportions would make for a hefty load on the wrist if the cases were entirely in gold.

The DeMonaco Tourbillon Ronde case is 43mm wide while the Carre case is 44.3mm wide. These are most certainly bold timepieces with a loud demeanor that is enhanced by many of the decorative elements on the dial and case. Most of the dial versions have either engraved elements or Tahitian mother-of-pearl centers. We like the applied hour markers which come in various forms, each crisply cut and polished. Legibility is actually quite good. though I feel that DeMonaco did not need to give these watches skeletonized hands (new hand options will likely be added in the future).

Ateliers DeMonaco Tourbillon Carre And Ronde Watches Hands On   hands on

5 comments
CG
CG

Like the irridesence of their MoP slice, almost looks like an anodized metal, not girly at all. The square case seems at odds with the face design elements, not attractive too clunky chunky. Yellow Gold doesn't work either, white gold w/ batons or numbers is my choice. .. surprised by this watch. ...bridges of crystal, cool!

OmniRak
OmniRak

The rose gold Tourbillon Ronde looks to be interesting.   The Tourbillon Carre on the other hand is more questionable for me. I can only  go by the wrist shots in the article here, but it appears somewhat awkward looking to my eyes in those photos. Just my first impression from the photos. Of course I can't really judge it (or anything) since I've never seen one in person.  This is  especially true when it comes to watches.  Just yesterday I was surprised and shocked to see someone walking down the street wearing a red gold MB&F Moonmachine. Never thought I'd ever see one of those. I had always thought of that watch as extremely odd looking from the photos I had seen, but it looked great in person seeing it in actual use on someone's wrist .  The Tourbillon Carre might also appear better to me in person as well. Sadly I probably will never know.

mesa13
mesa13

So beautiful !!!!!! They're pure art 

Ulysses31
Ulysses31

The round model looks amazing.  It is rather distinctive with beautiful little flourishes here and there.  While it is a partially see-through dial, it's not too distracting.  I wonder if they would consider at least frosting the glass so the hairy horrors beneath the dial can be obscured.  The rectangular one on the other hand is a brick and with little difference in the dial design from the round model and looks like it was an afterthought.  I don't mind MOP but sometimes it can look a little too colourful.