L. Leroy Osmior Tourbillon Regulateur Automatique Watches Hands-On

L. Leroy Osmior Tourbillon Regulateur Automatique Watches Hands-On

L. Leroy Osmior Tourbillon Regulateur Automatique Watches Hands On   hands on

One of the latest old names in watch making to be brought back is L. Leroy, this time under the Festina Group that also owns Perrelet as well as watch movement maker Soprod. L. Leroy was a well-regarded watchmaker from the 18th century but the name was used in pocket watches and wristwatches into the 20th century. A few years ago (I believe) it was brought back as a high-end luxury brand with some interesting models. This is their tourbillon, and it has a lot going for it. Let's check out in more detail the L. Leroy Osmior Tourbillon Regulateur Automatique collection of watches.

I was "that guy" who pronounced the name of the brand like some unsophisticated American saying "L. Leeroy." Thankfully my associates with a more classy connection with the realm of world languages promptly corrected me. "No, it isn't the name of some guy from Baltimore. It is pronounced L. Le-raw." With that out of the way, I was given permission to view the collection. While I am not a fan of each L. Leroy watch, I must admit that all of their models have at least something going for them and with some tweaking, the entire collection could be really strong.

L. Leroy Osmior Tourbillon Regulateur Automatique Watches Hands On   hands on

L. Leroy Osmior Tourbillon Regulateur Automatique Watches Hands On   hands on

L. Leroy Osmior Tourbillon Regulateur Automatique Watches Hands On   hands on

On paper and in reality, the Osmior collection ain't bad. The in-house movements contain a tourbillon, regulator-style display, self-winding automatic rotor and are COSC Chronometer certified. Chronometer tourbillons are actually quite rare, which is seen as an irony to most people as tourbillons are "supposed" to be accurate.

In addition to the standard Osmior Tourbillon models is the Skeleton version as well as the haute jewelery model that is covered in baguette-cut diamonds. The latter version is at least commendable for being very blingy, but also quite legible. It is also worth noting that compared to round-cut stones, squared baguette diamonds are much more masculine when they are seen covering a watch. I rather enjoy the look of these watches to be honest even though I think they will not be an instant hit. They are more visually bold than a Breguet, and make Patek Philippe watches feel stark in comparison. Not that those are the only two competitors, but L. Leroy does offer something different for sure.

L. Leroy Osmior Tourbillon Regulateur Automatique Watches Hands On   hands on

7 comments
Ryan B
Ryan B

My eyes are burning!

Ulysses31
Ulysses31

Some really beautiful design flourishes on these watches.  I love that gear with the cut-outs around the tourbillon, and the movement looks amazing.  Diamonds ruin everything; I wouldn't have a very high opinion of someone who couldn't appreciate the innate beauty of these timepieces without them being plastered with gems.

Ayreonaut
Ayreonaut

No matter how you pronounce it, I do not want "Leroy" on my six-figure watch face.  

Shawnnny
Shawnnny

"Originally released in about 2011." If I would have read this two years ago, I would have sold my house and cars to buy one. Now I'll never get one. Oh well, the house and cars are safe for now.

SuperStrapper
SuperStrapper

Very nice. Put a gun to my head and tell me to name another automatic chonometer regulateur tourbillion and I'd likely end up dead. Honestly, I think the automatic bit is the most unique, for a watch like this. 

Some of those tourbie gears are almost impossibly skeletonized - very intricate work. 


The only part that doesn't seem to fit is the seconds hand emerging from the tourbillon. With it's dedicate arrow shape, and mismatched flathead screw, it stands alone in terms of styling - strange, really. I do like how it is not centrally mounted and kinda creeps out from from the depths of horology. Not sure if it is just reflections, but the hour and minute hands seem to have what looks like hammered-finish caps over the pinion holes - why wouldn't they do that for the seconds counter as well?

MarkCarson
MarkCarson

Wow nice. I like them all except the one plastered in diamonds. And not because of the bling factor. I don't like that the open space at the top of the dial looks like part of the dial is missing when it has the diamonds. On the other references (especially the silver dial with the gold ring) it looks fine and indeed structural. And the one that really grabs me is the gold skeleton. Looks great front and rear (just like a beautiful women should).

MarkCarson
MarkCarson

Isn't that literally "the royal" and figuratively "the king" in French? I know that in America, "Lee-roy" does not sound so regal, so I get where you are coming from. Cheers.