Panerai Radiomir 1940 Limited Edition Chronographs

Panerai Radiomir 1940 Limited Edition Chronographs

Panerai Radiomir 1940 Limited Edition Chronographs   hands on

Panerai has a knack for SIHH novelties and this year is no exception. With a handful of special pieces being released, I'm going to focus on what caught my eye. Being rather firmly a Radiomir guy (unless we're talking about last year's drool-worthy 1950 Regatta 3 Days), I found myself taken by the new Radiomir 1940 Chronograph. With three limited edition versions rendered exclusively in precious metals, these aren't your garden variety Radiomirs and their dial design eschews Panerai's signature sparse appeal for something entirely more retro.

Panerai Radiomir 1940 Limited Edition Chronographs   hands on

While the three versions may sport different case materials and dial designs, they do have a number of shared elements. Case size is 45mm wide and, being of the "1940" Radiomir variety, they have Luminor style lugs (rather than the Radiomir's signature wire lugs). The 1940 Chronograph is fitted with a 2.8 mm thick plexiglas crystal up front and a sapphire crystal in the rear to allow a view of the Panerai OP XXV movement. The plexiglas is likely employed to support the vintage vibe of the 1940 aesthetic.

Panerai Radiomir 1940 Limited Edition Chronographs   hands on

Panerai Radiomir 1940 Limited Edition Chronographs   hands on

The three versions span an ivory dial model with a polished platinum case called the "Platino" which is limited to 50 units (PAM518), a brown dial model with an 18 ct polished red gold case called the "Oro Rosso" (PAM519) and a black dial model with an 18 ct polished white gold case called the "Oro Bianco" (PAM520). The latter two models are limited to 100 units and all models come on an alligator strap with matching tang buckle.

Panerai Radiomir 1940 Limited Edition Chronographs   hands on

It's pretty tough to say which is my favorite as the Platino has a beautiful ivory dial with blued steel accents for the chronograph register and chronograph seconds. This would definitely be one to see in person as there is a chance that the light tone of the dial might be overpowered by the large and chunky case. The Oro Rosso has arguably the best dial, a deep brown with a super cool California dial (a mix of Roman and Arabic numerals), but a 45 mm red gold watch is a tough sell for my wrist.

Panerai Radiomir 1940 Limited Edition Chronographs   hands on

Finally, the Oro Bianco is the only one to get a sandwich dial, in which the luminous elements of the black dial are actually cut-outs that reveal a luminous layer underneath the main dial, another distinctly Panerai design trait. Each model has its merits and the overall design is one that mixes a bit of current-day Panerai with a lot of vintage-sourced style.

Panerai Radiomir 1940 Limited Edition Chronographs   hands on

Functionally, the Radiomir 1940 Chronograph offers a standard time display along with a two register chronograph system displaying running seconds and a 30 minute chronograph measure which displays its seconds centrally (on the large seconds hand). The movement enclosed within the large case is the Panerai OP XXV which is based on the Minerva 13-22 movement which has been connected with Panerai as far back as the 1920s. This hand-wound column wheel chronograph movement features 22 jewels, a rate of 18,000 vph and 55 hours of power reserve.

Panerai Radiomir 1940 Limited Edition Chronographs   hands on

Panerai Radiomir 1940 Limited Edition Chronographs   hands on

With pricing starting at €44,000 (~$54000) and topping out at €60,000 (~$81,250) for the Platino, this is definitely a case of Panerai making something special for a truly niche group of collectors. Add in the reality of a rather limited supply, the excitement generated by a stand-out design from Panerai and you have the making of a very popular watch and word on the street is that they've already sold out. While far too expensive to grace my wrist, price is seldom the deciding factor for the well-heeled watch lover and the Radiomir 1940 Chronograph definitely has the appeal to outweigh its price tag. panerai.com

14 comments
darmody
darmody

These look awesome, good to see remakes of old school styles.

roger the goodgion
roger the goodgion

$80k and no power reserve indicator. So many things I like about Panerai, and so many things i hate.  I agree with Mandime, JLC  and Lange offer so much more, including movements that they sold to Panerai ( i am talking about JLC here) untill they could get their in-houses going.

gerikson
gerikson

These look great! Of course precious metals ensure the price tag will be crazy... but if it were offered in steel I'd re-evaluate my appreciation of Panerai.

Ulysses31
Ulysses31

Some of these are good-looking, unlike the usual run-of-the-mill Panerais that are so uninspiring.  The price makes me wince, knowing what else I could get for that much.  You'd have to REALLY love Panerai to fork over the cash for these.

MikeinFrankfurt
MikeinFrankfurt

I've never met a Panerai chrono that I actually liked...until now.   The ivory-dialed piece with its blue central hand is really great looking, IMO.  Yes, the prices are crazy.   For all of us, including myself, who'd like to see a stainless version...we're deluding ourselves.  I'd bet that would list at $35-40K.

Panagiotis
Panagiotis

I don't care that you can get 1-2 PP's for the price--I LOVE these models!!!

Panerai has a way of tugging at heartstrings, bypassing all other organs, and reducing the mind to performing only the most basic motor functions--take wallet out, give money, receive watch,  rinse, repeat.

mandime
mandime

So I got $80k burning a hole in my pocket. . . I'd walk right past The Panerai boutique and head to the following in order: JLC, Lange, Roger Smith, Patek, Vacheron, A.P., Breguet, you get the picture. . . or fill a bucket with Reverso's, Speedys, Universals, Carreras, Monaco's, 50 Fathoms, Nomos, and top it off with a vintage Minerva and maybe even a 40mm Radiomir as garnish.

MarkCarson
MarkCarson

Fugly watches. I usually moan about the lack of markers beyond their usual 12, 3, 6, 9 numerals and batons for the others. So I wanted to like these but I really do not. Lovely from the back though.

marbstiu
marbstiu

faketinas.

faketinas everywhere!

Grinnie Jax
Grinnie Jax

Rather nice looking Panerais, however, for such enormous price:

1) They could have easily developed inhouse movement and not use Minerva.

2) There are lots of similar dial style round watches that are x10-x60 times cheaper, from Nivrel and Alpina to Baume&Mercier, Vulcain and Revue Thommen.

So, for such a price A.Lange & Sohne seems more fantastic.

Nevertheless, these are among the best PAMs I have seen.

phb
phb

Good looking indeed, Sinn owners (and quite a few others too) will feel right at home, same hands, same chrono hands and same acrylic crystal!

PhilMaurer
PhilMaurer

Stunning, one of the best looking Pan's I've seen in along time.  Simply perfect... except no stainless version for us mere mortals.