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New Bremont MBII-WH Watch With White Dial

New Bremont MBII-WH Watch With White Dial Watch Releases

Along with the new ALT1-ZT/51 watch, British Bremont has announced another update to their lineup, with a new dial option for their bestselling MBII model. The new Bremont MBII-WH sports a crisp white dial with black markers and hands, offering a recognizable but entirely different look and feel for this well-known, aviation-inspired design. The MBII, designed in a partnership with the ejection seat manufacturer Martin Baker, has become a calling card for Bremont. Over the past few years, they have slowly introduced new models and variations into the MB range, including the MBIII, a GMT version launched at Baselworld 2014.

New Bremont MBII-WH Watch With White Dial Watch Releases

New Bremont MBII-WH Watch With White Dial Watch Releases

The Bremont MBII-WH is the first with a non-black dial and, much like Bremont’s white-dialed SOLO, the white dial is an excellent fit for the MBII design and is arguably more legible than its black-dialed counterparts. The successful MBII form factor is unchanged, with the white dial model retaining the 43mm Trip-Tick hardened steel case, multi-layer anti-reflective coated sapphire crystal and your choice of aluminum middle case section in orange, green or anthracite.

New Bremont MBII-WH Watch With White Dial Watch Releases

New Bremont MBII-WH Watch With White Dial Watch Releases

Also unchanged is the battery of tests the MBII must survive on its way to production. As you can imagine, the stresses of being ejected from a aircraft offer an ideal environment to develop a watch that is resistant to shock, temperature extremes, and troublesome vibrations. The MBII is partly where Bremont’s “Tested Beyond Endurance” ethos came from, with the watch required to survive not only ejection (impressive) but also rapid substantial changes in pressure (both positive and negative) and humid environments like that on the deck of an aircraft carrier. Temperature testing spans -40C to +40C for prolonged intervals and MBs must also be capable of surviving an MFOS crash test (Multi-functional Operators Seat, used in some military helicopters), which generates some 18G.

New Bremont MBII-WH Watch With White Dial Watch Releases

New Bremont MBII-WH Watch With White Dial Watch Releases

This resistance to shock and vibration is thanks to a flexible shock absorbing inner case ring that supports the movement. Surrounding this system is an inner case layer made of soft iron to provide magnetic protection. The well-protected movement in question is Bremont’s BE-36AE. Essentially a Bremont-modified ETA 2836, the 4Hz BE-36AE offers day-date along with 40 hours power reserve and COSC certification.

New Bremont MBII-WH Watch With White Dial Watch Releases

As an owner of a lovely white-dialed SOLO (reviewed here), I am thrilled to see Bremont add another white dial to their line up and I really like the way that the mostly black hour hand pops over the white dial. Also, with Bremont being a British manufacturer, it seems fitting that their most popular aviation chronometer be offered with a white dial and arabic numerals. The Bremont MBII-WH carries a list price of $5,495 USD, and we’ll be sure to go hands-on next month at Baselworld 2016. bremont.com

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  • SuperStrapper

    I like this brand less every time they release a new watch. I’m done trying.

  • PleaseSpellRoman4AsIV

    This actually looks nice with the white dial. They could drop some of the text/logo on the bottom part of the dial.

  • wallydog2

    Handsome watch. I want one! Next time I eject from my F-86 Sabre over Pork Chop Hill I’ll see if it still does its John Cameron Swayze “takes a lickin’, and keeps on tickin’ “. The real test will be next Black Friday at Walmart. (The crowns remind me of my vice-grips.)

  • Beefalope

    How many different designers worked on this watch at once? 8? 10? 12?

  • Raymond Wilkie

    It didn’t need that awful looking anti shock logo, just looks stupid. Asides that, I like it, but its $5,490 more than am prepared to pay for an automatic watch.

  • Marius

    Is Bremont living in an imaginary world? $5,500 for a three hander eta? Essentially, Bremont is a mid-tier, mid-range brand that mostly uses inexpensive eta movements in hardened steel cases. That’s fine; the only problem is that Damasko does the same, only that Damasko has better steel cases and is much cheaper.

    The second problem is that Bremont has similar prices to prestigious brands such as Omega or IWC. For instance, for 5,500 you could get the Omega AquaTerra or the Seamaster300, both equipped with the cool in-house 8500 caliber. Alternatively, you could buy an IWC Pilot Mark XVII, or a Pilot`s Chronograph.

    • word-merchant

      I keep expecting watches like this to crash and burn, because they are such poor value for money, and I keep being proved wrong. Bremont have got a boutique near where I work, in a very expensive piece of real estate, so clearly they’re either doing something that appeals to a lot of people or they have the levels of debt that would cause me not to sleep at night. Or perhaps both.

      • SuperStrapper

        I would imagine the the Boeing deal along with being showcased in that ridiculous movie last year (which made it to Netflix in record time) helped bolster them financially, but I get the sense that Bremont runs pretty lean: they are pumping most of their available revenue into manufacturing movements in the UK, which I would consider to be a high risk/moderate reward venture. Considering that boutiques are for now limited to London, NY, and HK, they are certainly placing themselves in front of the deepest pockets, but what will a manufacture Bremont cost if an ETA-based one is $6k? They’ll position themselves as competition for the likes of Cartier, and that will be a pretty hardcore uphill battle.

    • TrevorXM

      “…only that Damasko has better steel cases and is much cheaper.”

      Yeah, FOUR THOUSAND DOLLARS CHEAPER for a comparable watch! With a VASTLY SUPERIOR case that is made from the same forged and nitrogen hardened patent steel they use in their Airbus and Eurofighter jet engine parts — and used to use in the Space Shuttle’s fuel pump when they did that. And if you want to talk over-engineering, it’s not even machined like other watch cases — it’s cut by electrical discharge so there are not internal stress points in the case like machining can cause.

      Hell, you could buy Damasko’s completely in-house calibre DK10 watch, that’s the most technologically advanced movement in Germany right now, complete with their bracelet — perhaps the best in the world — for $3,695.00! and this Bremont with strap and common ETA sells for $5,495 USD??? $1800 more for less than half the watch? Who are the idiots buying these things?

      Here’s a video for the Damasko DK10 — because you’re never going to see a review of one on A Blog To Watch, let alone Hodinkee, and many people don’t even know they exist and are many times over better than something like a Bremont.

      https://youtu.be/tTAIj0q6N90

      • Marius

        Thank you for the video. In my opinion, this Damasko wipes the floor with any Bremont, and looking at the materials used, the technology and the in-house movement, I’d take this over a
        Tudor Pelagos.

        • TrevorXM

          You’re welcome. Most people have absolutely no idea because there’s no publicity of Damasko on the big watch blogs, and Damasko aren’t at the big Swiss watch shows. I will have to say that I have changed my opinion of Tudor since they went in-house and found their own design voice. They’ve got a strong identity and integrity now, and finally do offer genuine value — which they never really did before — unlike Bremont, which is a complete joke, in my opinion.

          • phildo864

            I like Damasko and Bremont. What does Damasko’s movement do better than Bremont’s modified eta? I like that the main spring and escapement are both silicone. So functionally speaking, is Damasko’s movement more accurate, resistant to shocks, or hold up better in the long run when housed in the respective cases?

  • iamcalledryan

    No mention of the purpose of the extra crown??

    I assume that it rotates the minutes ring but with those markers I cannot see any value in it?

    I do not abhor the brand like so many commenters here, but this one just doesn’t look as good to me as the others.

  • CortexUK

    I think I might boycott the watch industry until they start producing 36s and 38s for gentlemen again. I’ve got 20 watches, for all occasions, so I don’t need any more.

  • CortexUK

    …and for that money I expect the inverted triangle to line up with the 12 marker. Perfectly.

    • Timestandsstill

      I believe that, at least in the case of the last photo in the article, this is due to the rotating inner ring not being lined up before the crown at 2pm was set. None of the minute markers line up with their indices either …..

      • CortexUK

        Fair enough. Thanks.

  • Ulysses31

    “Bremont – At the forefront of nothing.” That should be the slogan of this company. That mid-section looks nasty. Is “invisible” a valid colour option? It looks like the finish you’d see on one of those cheap Chinese anodised flashlights. How about that bizarre seconds hand, or the plain and uninspiring case-back? There never seems to be any cohesive design in Bremont watches except when they stumble upon it serendipitously. If it were not for marketing skill and a reliance on the general ignorance of the watch buying community, this company would be struggling. At Bremont prices you can get better movements, better design, better pedigree (if that matters to you) from other manufacturers.

    • TechUser2011

      The ignorance in your post is just suffocating. I guess while you where illiterately scanning through the pictures, you were unable to read the important parts: “This resistance to shock and vibration is thanks to a flexible shock absorbing inner case ring that supports the movement. Surrounding this system is an inner case layer made of soft iron to provide magnetic protection.”

      And no one cares about “movements” or “innards”. That’s like buying a car based on the engine”. In case you don’t have a car, that’s what we have here in first-world countries. No one ever says “Why does that car cost $50,000 when the engine doen’t cost that much”. Maybe you should go pick up and hold some watches before you criticize them through pictures.

    • Ulysses31

      Here’s why the ability to delete comments allows passive aggressive individuals to bully commenters in private. I know I have said some unpopular things in the past, but I have never deleted a comment, because that would be gutless. I try to own my mistakes and learn from them, and have been lucky enough to learn from the people here with a greater understanding of the subject than me. It is their experience that often informs what I say. Anyway, let’s examine what was said:

      “TechUser2011

      The ignorance in your post is just suffocating. I guess while you where illiterately scanning through the pictures, you were unable to read the important parts: “This resistance to shock and vibration is thanks to a flexible shock absorbing inner case ring that supports the movement. Surrounding this system is an inner case layer made of soft iron to provide magnetic protection.” And no one cares about “movements” or “innards”. That’s like buying a car based on the engine”. In case you don’t have a car, that’s what we have here in first-world countries. No one ever s ays “Why does that car cost $50,000 when the engine doen’t cost that much”. Maybe you should go pick up and hold some watches before you criticize them through pictures.”

      Accusing me of being illiterate while in the very same sentence using “where” instead of “were” is delightful.

      I don’t have a problem with the internal shock resistance system, but rather how it is packaged – the external aluminium ring is not a crucial element to that resistance, which makes me wonder what your complaint is. It looks cheap and is knurled for no apparent reason other than “style”, similar to how Invicta watches have many elements knurled that serve no purpose.

      He feels it is also worth noting that the movement contains an iron core for magnetic protection, despite this being perhaps the least sophisticated form of magnetic protection used in watches today.

      Also, “no-one cares about movements”. See, apparently everyone who expects such an expensive watch to come with a non-off-the-shelf movement is a moron. If you’re happy to be exploited, that is your choice, but the majority are not quite so foolish. Unless you are an oil sheik, value is always a factor. If you pay more, you should expect to get more when compared with what direct competitors offer in the same price range.

      This is not the kind of thing I like to read when checking my morning emails.

  • IanE

    As a Brit, I would love to love Bremont!

    • DanW94

      If you can’t bring yourself to like Bremont, and want to root for a home team, you could give these England based guys a look;

      http://www.garrick.co.uk/

      • IanE

        Looks interesting (& perhaps pricey – I shall see!). I haven’t seen this company before – will definitely have a look!

  • Astronuts

    The case is interesting at least. Fuzzy numbers are fuzzy, the handset looks like the cow goes moo spin toy I had as a child, and the anti-shock logo looks the same as as my brake pad warning light on my VW.

  • ??????

    I would love to love Bremont as well… But, 5,500$ for 43 mm ETA-threehander. Finish looks so much simpler than for any Grand Seiko or Omega (not to mention superb inhouse calibers the latter two have). Ridiculous… Anyway, the white dial is not bad.

  • Bert Kanne

    The price of this watch is due to the cost of living in London, right?

    • TechUser2011

      Most likely the price is due to lots of people buying their watches at those prices.

  • Roma KLM

    18G antishock is something extraordinary. In simple words, I can hurl my Bremont as I wish.
    On the whole, I like the watch. But I would get rid of the day window (never liked it, especially if it is displaced). And the bee loop on the second hand disarranges the appearance.
    The middle case section would embellish any watch, I love it.

    • Boogur T. Wang

      Good points. I also think the day feature is not needed.
      However, I do think the “bee loop” on the seconds indicator is meant to represent the “pull handle to eject” widget from an airplane. I seem to remember them looking like that.

      • Mark Baran

        You’re correct on the loop.

    • Mark Baran

      I like the day window on a simple three hand watch. However, I really hate it when the wheel is not properly centered in the display window. That would be a deal killer for me.

  • hatster

    Woah. Not sure I have seen such a simple watch generate so much heat. Can I just ‘like it’? Is that OK with folks here?

    • Mark Baran

      That is OK with me….. 🙂

  • Rupert Muller

    18G? And that’s labelled on the dial? They must be kidding!

    Other manufacturers (see IWC example below) test their watches up to 25G, 100G and even 500G for several thousand hits. And that goes without putting an infantile sketch on the dial…
    Check it out:
    http://www.iwc.com/en/about/manufacture/#TESTS

  • “As you can imagine, the stresses of being ejected from a aircraft offer
    an ideal environment to develop a watch that is resistant to shock,
    temperature extremes, and troublesome vibrations. ”

    Yeah, I shudder to recount the number of times I’ve been forcefully hurled from my plane and, as I plunge headlong into the North Atlantic, frantically reach for my wrist to make sure my watch is still within COSC specifications.

    Marketing gimmicks like Bremont’s are as amusing as dive watch manufacturers who think saturation divers are wearing 20 thousand dollar chronographs while welding oil platforms, or that rec divers are routinely exploring the Mariana Trench and NEED a 6000 Meter piece to complement their Go Pros.

    For one tenth the price, with a dual time complication. You can dive with it, too: