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Christopher Ward C7 Rapide Collection Watches

Christopher Ward C7 Rapide Collection Watches Watch Releases

Direct-to-consumer London-based watch brand Christopher Ward is perhaps best known for their Trident collection of 300m automatic dive watches with seconds hands featuring a trident at their base. However, Christopher Ward are also the producers of a diverse range of sports watches that include pieces oriented around aviation, dress, and motorsports. Recently, Christopher Ward announced a revamp of their Motorsports collection to include new models in a variety of sizes powered by quartz or automatic movements, all under the Christopher Ward C7 Rapide moniker. These watches feature Christopher Ward’s new “twin flag” logo meant to represent both the British and Swiss flags together, and no “Christopher Ward” wordmark on the dials.

Consisting of no less than new quartz three-hander and chronograph watches, automatic three-hander and chronograph watches, a COSC-certified quartz chronograph, and a COSC-certified automatic three-hander with a black DLC-treated case, the new C7 Rapide collection adds considerable breadth to Christopher Ward’s already sizable watch offering. For the sake of brevity, we’ll be handling this hefty release all together.

Christopher Ward C7 Rapide Collection Watches Watch Releases

Christopher Ward C7 Rapide Quartz Watches

We start with the new Christopher Ward C7 Rapide Quartz, a time and date only, Swiss Ronda 715-quartz powered watch featuring near identical aesthetics to its more expensive automatic siblings in a more affordable package. Like other time and date members of the new C7 Rapide Collection, the Rapide Quartz is tastefully sized at 42mm in diameter. Available with a blue or black textured dial with applied three dimensional hour markers to catch the light as well as a twin flag motif at twelve o’clock, the new C7 Rapide Quartz also features a bevelled minute track and aluminum bezel insert with minute markings at five minute intervals, which tops off the newly designed case.

One of the more striking features of the new collection is the case, which is now a four piece sandwich style construction very reminiscent of fellow British watchmakers at Bremont. The crown is large and knurled to give it a tool watch feel. The C7 Rapide quartz will be available in no fewer than 8 configurations and will retail for a pretty reasonable $455–$525 depending on strap or bracelet choice.

Christopher Ward C7 Rapide Collection Watches Watch Releases

Christopher Ward C7 Rapide Quartz Chronograph

Next in the new quartz collection is the C7 Rapide Chronograph, a Swiss Ronda 5021.1D powered, stainless steel driver’s chronograph also in a 42mm stainless steel case and featuring near identical styling to the time and date version with the addition of sub-dials – one for running seconds at three o’clock and a thirty minute counter at six. The C7 Rapide Chronograph will be available with either a black, white, or British green dial and buyers will have to choose between seven strap or bracelet combinations. Also different from the time and date version is the six o’clock location for the date window. Christopher Ward’s C7 Rapide Chronograph will retail for between $565–$635 depending on strap/bracelet choice.

Christopher Ward C7 Rapide Collection Watches Watch Releases

C7 Rapide Chronograph COSC Limited Edition Quartz Watch

Christopher Ward C7 Rapide Collection Watches Watch Releases

At the top of Christopher Ward’s range of quartz C7 Rapide watches is the Chronograph Limited Edition that is different from the standard model in its blue dial and bezel with yellow accents, traditional quartz chronograph layout with white sub registers at two, six, and ten o’clock, as well as the inclusion of the thermo-compensated ETA COSC certified movement which is said to ensure accuracy of within ten seconds per year. The C7 Rapide Chronograph Limited Edition will retail for $910–$980 depending on which of the three strap options is selected.

Christopher Ward C7 Rapide Collection Watches Watch Releases

Christopher Ward C7 Rapide Collection Watches Watch Releases

Perhaps the real star of the new C7 Rapide Collection is the inclusion of two new automatic powered versions, one in time and date only powered by the Swiss-made Sellita SW200 and a chronograph powered by the venerable ETA 7750. Both are similar to their quartz powered brethren in terms of their physical size at 42mm in width but feature slightly different styling with regard to dial layout and hour markers.

Christopher Ward C7 Rapide Collection Watches Watch Releases

Christopher Ward C7 Rapide Collection Watches Watch Releases

The three handed time and date only C7 Rapide Automatic, available with either a black or blue dial, has a very similar look to the quartz versions with the addition of oversized applied numerals at twelve, two, four, six, eight, and ten o’clock as opposed to just twelve and six as on the quartz models. The four piece case design, aluminum bezel insert with five minute intervals, and bevelled minute track are the same as on the quartz version. As you’d imagine, the word “automatic” also appears at six o’clock in addition to the twin flag motif at twelve o’clock. Sellita’s capable SW200 movement makes the watch a good value at $795–$865 depending on the eight leather, steel, or “high-density webbing” choices on offer.

Christopher Ward C7 Rapide Collection Watches Watch Releases

Complementing the new automatic collection is the C7 Rapide Chronograph Automatic, which may be the most distinctive piece in the line. Owing to the sub-dial configuration inherent in the ETA 7750 it utilizes, the Rapide Chronograph Automatic, available with only a black dial, has a running seconds sub-dial at nine o’clock, a twelve hour indication at six o’clock with the date nearly tucked inside, and a thirty minute sub-dial at twelve o’clock. This rearrangement causes the twin flag logo to be scooted over to the three o’clock position.

Christopher Ward C7 Rapide Collection Watches Watch Releases

Christopher Ward C7 Rapide Collection Watches Watch Releases

Remaining dial elements, case construction, and the bezel are identical to the other time and date only automatics in the collection. The C7 Rapide Chronograph Automatic is also available in five configurations and will retail for between $1,710–$1,780 depending on strap choice. As if the fine chaps at Christopher Ward hand’t done enough in introducing so many choices in their C7 Rapide collection, they elected to also offer COSC-certified versions, including the quartz chronograph mentioned above and an automatic with a serious-looking red and black color scheme.

Christopher Ward C7 Rapide Collection Watches Watch Releases

Christopher Ward C7 Rapide Collection Watches Watch Releases

The C7 Rapide Day Date COSC Limited Edition, available in only 100 pieces, is identical to the standard model other than the addition of the day function to complement the date, the PVD case coating (black on top and bottom and red for the inner portion of the case), and the chronometer certified ETA 2836 movement within. It will be available on either a webbing strap or on Piccari leather for $1,035.

Christopher Ward C7 Rapide Collection Watches Watch Releases

A totally redesigned collection like what Christopher Ward has created with the C7 Rapide watches demonstrates their growth as a brand and determination to offer a diverse and interesting collection to their fans – or an alternative to, say, Montblanc’s Timewalker. Like the rest of the collection, these Christopher Ward watches are priced a lot lower than many with similar appointments, owed largely to their direct-to-consumer model and limited marketing efforts. With tastefully designed options and combinations, the new C7 Rapide collection offers a lot of options for anyone who’s interested in a Swiss-made, motorsports-inspired watch. christopherward.co.uk

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Comments

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  • These poor guys will never find a logo that works….

  • Kudos to Christopher Ward for using a logo on the dial instead of their brand name, which is often overpoweringly large and awkwardly placed.

    • David Williams

      Good-looking watches – no more or less so than others in this price range from Tissot, Hamilton, Mido and others. And yes, it’s good to see the off-putting personal name gone from the dial – the logo looks much better but raises a question. If one half of it represents the Swiss flag (white cross on red), does this mean that the other half is the flag of St George (red cross on white) – patron saint of England (not the whole of Britain) and numerous other places. It’s tempting to see it as two Swiss flags, so that many more people can now afford a “double-swiss”.

      • Ha! I agree with your assertion that the logo is indecipherable. They need to find something that works and stick with it. Aside from the branding consultants they are obviously using, no one is benefitting from their parade of logos.

  • DanW94

    Another logo change and quartz offerings starting at 500 dollars that resemble run of the mill mall offerings. CW or Chris. Ward or Christopher Ward or Prince’s old symbol or however they identify themselves these days seem lost.

  • Pete Pete

    the design sensibility of the dial feels like a combination of Bremont and Invicta– both excellent brands to be associated with

    • BNABOD

      But think of the limitless options combining the two names BreVicta or BrinVincta or InviMont just powerful powerful brand names

  • Marius

    Christopher Ward changes its logo more often than I change my Thai ladyboys. This is not a good proposition, unless you like taking intravenous antibiotics for treating syphilis and ghonorea (also known as “Double Trouble”).

    • egznyc

      I think “Double Trouble” was the stage name of a dynamic duo at a Manhattan men’s club once upon a time. In case one were not satisfied with a single female performing a lap dance ….

    • Tea Hound

      I was told by a friend of a friend that Thai ladyboys are like a vacuum cleaner bags: they get full up, but you can get them emptied a couple of times; after that you need to replace them with a new one, or the suction power goes.

  • socrates35

    SIGH…so much time and effort put into this project, with such singularly unimpressive results. Maybe they’ll get lucky and find enough punters willing to part with their hard-earned cash for these to make it worth their while.

  • silkhead

    what is wrong with just plain ole CW

    • proudAmerican702

      That’s already planned as next month’s logo. 😉

    • NC

      ?W ?

  • simon

    Starting to get the feeling that christopher ward is just trolling us with all of these hideous logo changes. As ridiculous and petty as that sounds, there clearly is no other logical explanation.

  • Yeah, I wouldn’t put my name on a $1000 battery powered watch, either.

  • I can’t wait for next month’s CW logo. This one is clean but the English flag thing (it’s not really the Union Jack on the logo) is not presented in the correct proportions, so it is not an obviously English flag. The Swiss flag part is fine. But as is, it just like the Swiss flag in reverse (or is it the Red Cross partnered with the Swiss?).

    Watches are sort of OK. I don’t think much of the huge numeral mixed with some baton maker versions though. And even at these price points, an aluminum bezel is just asking to get scratched.

    I like the non-COSC quartz panda the best in terms of colorway. But I already have a quartz chronograph, so not for me.

  • Craig Lewis

    Dial grades:

    Colors: 90. Some are a bit different from the usual shades. I like them. Texture is always nice.
    Logo: 0. AWFUL. Loathsome. Ridiculous. Meaningless.
    Number font: 40. Fundamentally FAR too heavy, making blobs.
    Indices: 30. Bad shapes. All the pics show these weird highlights at the corners that are completely off-putting.

    Overall: 40. SEVERE fail.

    Look for Yet Another Round of CW Dumping as the new logo goes over like a lead balloon.

    At this point, I would not honestly recommend CW as a *brand* because they seem so erratic.

  • Tea Hound

    None of these designs work for me at all, and I hate the new logo. But these do look like reasonable alternatives to Tissots (that I also tend to dislike too).

  • egznyc

    You change your mind
    Like a girl changes clothes …

    • egznyc

      Why oh why do I see “0 comments” in the upper right of every article now? What happened?

      • Raymond Wilkie

        Still a few niggles going from http:// to https://

        • egznyc

          Ahh – so I’m not the only one …

          • Raymond Wilkie

            No

          • egznyc

            Anyone ever told you that you’re rather laconic? ;-). Maybe it’s because it’s the middle of the night in Scotland?

          • Raymond Wilkie

            Yes.

  • Raymond Wilkie

    Can’t think of a good thing to say about it, except maybe it’s watch shaped.
    Moving on™

  • error406

    Crude. Clunky. And somehow not all that far off from something decent. Pretty much sums up CW in general. Never manages to really hit the sweet spot.

  • Mark1884

    Oh CW, what is going on with your logo’s??
    Please go back to the “CW” and leave it at that.
    I have been a fan of the Trident line for some time. These new offerings are not exactly my style though. I continue to believe that CW represents a great value proposition. COSC auto & quartz.
    I do not like them being compared to Bremont in any fashion. (I know case similarity only) Big difference here folks.
    BIG difference!!!

  • Tea Hound

    My idea for their next logo: it channels 70s and 80s arcade games, so will suit the audience:

    Christopher ? – – — —- ? WARD!

  • BNABOD

    Sporty but clunky

  • Mike Darwin Brown

    Another logo???

  • SuperStrapper

    >aw sweet zero comments I’m first!
    >200 comments
    >mfw

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/dc43f6941fccc0be85f0415692783fda7a99bf3402dba322ad23475ff9850152.jpg

    Anyway, I’d love to love these watches. But they stink. I actually would normally like this dial branding, but because it’s the 27th branding update this year, I’m just pissed off they did it again.

    If Christopher ward was a collectable brand, they would be creating a collector discrepancy like autographed baseballs. The signature changes over the years, so beware of fakes.

    • The thumbs are very wrong on those glasses. But mostly I’m bothered by his flat chin. One of Marius’ with a rug burn?

      • SuperStrapper

        $1 on eBay just doesn’t attract the same quality as it did back in the day…

  • Ross Diljohn

    It’s good to see such variety in models and pricing. It’s bad that I can’t find a single one I like in the bunch. Also,why change the logo?

    • Changing the logo often is a compulsion with CW

      • IG

        They should have an underwear line beside the watches.

        • Mikita

          One of their previous logos indeed reminded of Calvin Klein.

    • proudAmerican702

      “Also,why change the logo?”

      Because it’s a new month. 😉

      • Ross Diljohn

        Ahhh…yes I suppose that must be it. It’s certainly the only thing that might make some sense.

  • Mikita

    New logo again. May I suggest some new ideas:

    “C-Ward”, “Christopher-W”, “ChWard”, “Chrissy Sissy Ward”, “Ward!”, “Ward, C.”, “ChRiStOpHeR WaRd”, “draW rehpotsirhC”, “Chriward Stopher”, “Wardstoph Erchrist”, “Toward Chrispher”, “WC”, “©®i$t0ph€® [email protected]®d”, “Wardians of Christopheron”, “Sir Phertoward Ch.”, “Wapher Christord” and the most unexpected: “Christopher Ward”.

  • Mikita

    This new logo looks like the Red Cross meets the Anti-Red Cross. Or + has sex with the Swiss flag (sorry, no offense, just think it looks ridiculous).

  • Richard

    Calling them “London based” is a bit much. Christopher Ward are based in Maidenhead which is over an hours drive (or 40 minutes train) from Central London. Their only showroom is also in Maidenhead, they have nothing in London and (just to make it even more difficult) it’s only open 9am-5pm Monday to Friday!

    So if you want to check out their collection on a weekend, be prepared for a long(ish) trip followed by disappointment…!

  • Yan Fin

    ANY logo is better then previous one. I am sure Ward will have more clients. At least we can look at Malvern MK III without nausea. Best of luck to them, sincerely.

    • IG

      But WTF is “K:” ?!?

      • Yan Fin

        It’s for Kristofer. Traditional spelling

  • Yan Fin

    By the way, can somebody explain what is good about aluminum bezel? Vs stainless?

    • eRZé

      I think the bezel is made of stainless steel. Only the insert is aluminum. Probably cheaper to make and replace.

      • Yan Fin

        Thank you

  • Ross

    There is no mention of it in the article, but is the Limited Edition COSC Chrono also a split seconds? It looks like it from the dial pics. I would think that would be mentioned first when listing all the features of the watch.

    • WINKS

      What makes you think it’s a split second chrono?

    • Mikita

      Ross, where is your bell?

  • mtnsicl

    They look like Nixon watches. That’s not a good thing.

    • Mark1884

      I hate to say it, but now that you mention it…………

  • WINKS

    Stringy-cheesy.

  • Ulysses31

    This brand seems determined to drive itself into obscurity, producing designs that resemble ever cheaper watches from other brands, while maintaining a relatively high price. We’re into fashion-brand territory now, with bright colours and looks that, while decent, can be found in watches no more than $300. Even the new logo, which is an improvement over the old one, seem more like an exercise in deliberate obfuscation. If anyone were to look at the dial and didn’t know better, would they be able to guess it was Christopher Ward? The CW logo was fine – now it seems like they’re ashamed of themselves and their past and want to be seen as something entirely different.

  • Ian john horwood

    The only maybe, and a big maybe only, half decent watch in the CW cataloge, and that is A BIG BUT, is probably the 38mm c65 trident vintage, and that is IF ONLY, AND A BIG ONLY, IF ONLY IF IT DOES NOT HAVE A PLASTIC ring spacer ring surrounding its selita automatic movement. This we dont know because we have never seem any picture’s of this watch with its caseback off, so reservations are on a very tight hold.

    • Mikita

      “38mm c65 trident vintage”

      And a parts bin crown without any logo on it?

  • Ian john horwood

    Quality control on CW watches has never ever, been very good at all. Like when some one may purchase a cheap china watch, you will have toungue in cheek and gritted teeth whether your watch is going to be a lemon, as reguards hand and marker alignment, and poor time keeping and accuracy, (automatics).

  • Dartagnan

    I’ll save you comment-readers some time. Almost entirely unflattering comments. Pretty much everyone is up-in-arms about the constant logo updates from CW. Not much love down there. Save yourself 10 minutes… Nothing to see here. Move along.

  • Paul Douglas Johnson

    I like this line of watches.

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