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Top 10 Watches Of SIHH 2016 & Show Report

Top 10 Watches Of SIHH 2016 & Show Report ABTW Editors' Lists

SIHH 2016 was an uplifting watch trade show experience for the aBlogtoWatch team this year – as well as the watch industry, in my opinion. From the perspective of watch journalism and editorial, there was a lot to be excited about, as well as many interesting stories to cover. Compared to the last few years – which tended to be quite slow – the brands displaying at SIHH this year in 2016 had a larger quantity of more impressive watches to show. We see totally updated collections, as well as revised classics, and of course, some stunning “mega watches.” While SIHH was still something we could easily wrap our minds around, it was still full of variety, value, and enough wow-factor to keep us glued to our keyboards trying to cover the cool stories each day.

Top 10 Watches Of SIHH 2016 & Show Report ABTW Editors' Lists

Before we get to the watches which as a team we feel are the top 10 timepieces of the show, I want to discuss the new “revised and expanded” SIHH this year, as well as some overall trends and industry sentiments. SIHH had a minor facelift but, more importantly, had a brand new area (the “Carré des Horlogers“) that housed a slew of some of our favorite independent watch makers. This new area features mini-booths for some of the top small watchmakers in the world – a situation which, when announced, told me that SIHH was finally ready to be inclusive of other brands in the same way that the FHH is. It perhaps shouldn’t surprise you that most of the same people who organize the SIHH also run the FHH (Foundation of Haute Horology).

Top 10 Watches Of SIHH 2016 & Show Report ABTW Editors' Lists

Top 10 Watches Of SIHH 2016 & Show Report ABTW Editors' Lists

The presence of the small brands did not take away from the impressive “grande” presence of the major “maisons.” Richemont’s finest and their close colleagues such as Audemars Piguet, Parmigiani, Richard Mille, and Grebel Forsey all had interesting things to show. What differed was the volume of new watches that was tremendous at some brands (say, Audemars Piguet), to more selective releases such as those from Piaget and Greubel Forsey.

Top 10 Watches Of SIHH 2016 & Show Report ABTW Editors' Lists

Top 10 Watches Of SIHH 2016 & Show Report ABTW Editors' Lists

In any event, there was strength at all the companies showing at SIHH 2016, and the feeling I got was that brands are taking market realities seriously, as well as focusing on products that consumers really want as opposed to padding the market with SKUs. A deeper look into this trend seemed to hint an even greater focus in 2016 on products to be sold directly to consumers via brand boutiques as opposed to mainly via third-party retailers.

Top 10 Watches Of SIHH 2016 & Show Report ABTW Editors' Lists

It has been a growing trend for a lot of watch brands of sufficient size to further increase their mono-brand boutique presence across the world, while at the same time reducing the number of third-party retailers that they work with. That means if you were previously used to the idea of buying a new IWC watch at a local independent watch retailer, in the future, you might very well be buying that same watch at an IWC store directly. There are both positives and negatives to this trend, of course, but among the two positives are 1) more specifically interesting watches that the brand feels you certainly want (as opposed to sometimes seemingly random models that look like they are meant to be bolstering the size of a collection) and 2) more reasonable prices in a lot of instances.

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Top 10 Watches Of SIHH 2016 & Show Report ABTW Editors' Lists

Top 10 Watches Of SIHH 2016 & Show Report ABTW Editors' Lists

Not that “luxury is dead” or anything, but pricing across the board seemed to be getting a bit more steady and focusing on the upper as well as entry-level ranges of the market. IWC and Baume & Mercier led the pack when it came to asserting “bang for your buck,” but even Greubel Forsey released a more affordable watch collection (despite being extremely limited). I’d say that the watch industry seems to be paying a lot more attention to what consumers want and what they say that they want – but, of course, as a function of what those brands feel their core DNA is all about.

Top 10 Watches Of SIHH 2016 & Show Report ABTW Editors' Lists

A. Lange & Sohne, for example, showed off their beautiful and mega-priced Datograph Perpetual Tourbillon. But aside from this exclusive lusty piece of horology, it is clear that they will see a lot more sales traction in the Saxonia Moon Phase with its easy-to-love dial, case size, and automatic movement.

Top 10 Watches Of SIHH 2016 & Show Report ABTW Editors' Lists

When it comes to exciting new or updated collections, Cartier, as always, does not fail to introduce something new with the release of the Drive de Cartier collection of cushion-shaped men’s watches. Vacheron Constantin delighted the enthusiast world with a very well conceived and totally updated Overseas collection that has no fewer than five new models and three new movements.

Top 10 Watches Of SIHH 2016 & Show Report ABTW Editors' Lists

Top 10 Watches Of SIHH 2016 & Show Report ABTW Editors' Lists

Just as we saw in 2015, the color blue is once again a force to be reckoned with in 2016. The hue that loves to wax and wane in popularity is trying to make a serious push to get on your wrist, finding itself in a whole slew of watches as accents, dial colors, and strap colors. Perhaps one of the most easy-to-miss new blue watches that I think are stunning is the new Cartier Calibre Diver watch in blue (available in both steel and gold). Speaking of gold, there is once again no shortage of it. In fact, we have very few new steel watches aside from the usual suspects at brands like IWC, Panerai, and Jaeger-LeCoultre. Gold is always going to be a inescapable part of the luxury watch experience, and for 2016, you start to see yellow gold showing up again – namely in Audemars Piguet who is really pushing a lot of new Royal Oak models in yellow gold.

Top 10 Watches Of SIHH 2016 & Show Report ABTW Editors' Lists

Top 10 Watches Of SIHH 2016 & Show Report ABTW Editors' Lists

Gold colors in the watch industry are funny because there doesn’t always seem to be a reason why yellow gold is not preferred. For many years, it was all about yellow gold, and then rose/pink/red gold started to dominate. Why? Brands would point to the fact that consumers seemed to not prefer yellow gold because it was “too showy” or that they preferred the warmer look of rose gold. Of course, the more reddish gold alloys are nice, but I think the watch industry pulled away from yellow gold in a dramatic way that wasn’t really necessary. In my opinion, the “return” of yellow gold across more products is an obvious move, so long as brands don’t abandon something else. In my opinion, all gold colors should be equally represented.

Top 10 Watches Of SIHH 2016 & Show Report ABTW Editors' Lists

At the higher end, we see a lot of impressive watches – many of which we cover below in our top 10 watches. Of course, SIHH 2016 had its fair share of diamond-decorated luxury wonders, but thankfully, most of the high-end models seemed to derive much of their value from complicated movements or, otherwise, artistic dial creations. I’ve noticed a real preference for “art dials” at the higher-end of the spectrum which is a good sign for design lovers who want a lot of visual beauty when spending the big bucks. Even something like the new Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso Tribute Gyrotourbillon had an element of hand-engraving as part of its value proposition.

Top 10 Watches Of SIHH 2016 & Show Report ABTW Editors' Lists

Top 10 Watches Of SIHH 2016 & Show Report ABTW Editors' Lists

The watch industry seems quite set on its future being about forming closer, more direct relationships with consumers, as well as refining brand images. This latter area is where so much confusion seems to exist. On the one hand, a brand feels that having too much varied product and experimentation confuses consumers and dilutes their carefully honed sense of image and personality. On the other hand, if they never experiment or release innovative products that people don’t expect, the brands come across as being really boring and perhaps even a “one-trick pony.”

Top 10 Watches Of SIHH 2016 & Show Report ABTW Editors' Lists

Top 10 Watches Of SIHH 2016 & Show Report ABTW Editors' Lists

Faced with these issues, brands continue to cycle through overall brand and product strategies as well as leaders and personnel. In my opinion, there is too much “musical chairs” going on, as many of the most talented individuals seem to move around way too much or exit the watch industry as quickly as they entered it. Luxury timepieces can be a harsh mistress, but I think the industry should really focus on celebrating creativity and good management more and encouraging talent to remain in quality positions, as well as ensure that really modern and innovative thinking is identified and encouraged to stay in the industry.

Top 10 Watches Of SIHH 2016 & Show Report ABTW Editors' Lists

I’ll sum up by saying once again that, from a product perspective, the aBlogtoWatch team was mostly really happy with a lot of the impressive products shown at the world’s premier luxury watch show. SIHH 2016, of course, is still really focused on the higher-end, but there are values for buyers of the $10,000-and-under watches, and well as pure horological magic for those collectors able to spend top dollar on the most impressive and exclusive wrist watch treats.

Now, without further ado, let’s see our Top 10 picks from SIHH 2016…

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  • Wow, lots of nice watches in the list with the Greubel Forsey being a standout for me both in terms of being unexpected and for having such a great look.

    On the other hand, a million bucks for the Richard Mille is a complete joke. And while it’s nice to see Panerai with a dial that is not black (or nearly so), it is still insanely priced for what you get.

    Besides the GF watch, the ones I really like are the pieces from: MB&F, PF, ALS and JLC. Thanks for the coverage this week guys. One day there were 10 posts – hard to keep up reading them all.

    • commentator bob

      There in a recorded interview of RM on another site and it seems like he is a cool guy that is in on the joke.
      Q
      Plus, having a 7 figure halo watch is important to the overall brand because ir helps people ‘only’ paying $150K for an RM feel like they are getting a good deal.

      • iamcalledryan

        Bless those little paupers and their entry-level Mille’s

    • hatster

      Just spotted a footballer/soccer player wearing a Richard Mille on TV. I think that just ended any interest for me right there.

  • benjameshodges

    My top 3 of SIHH 2016 would be:

    1. Richard Mille RM 50-02 ACJ Tourbillon Split Seconds Chronograph

    2. IWC Big Pilot’s Watch 500912

    3. A. Lange & Söhne Datograph Perpetual Tourbillon

  • commentator bob

    A Rolex cushion homage with a white dial already available on other Rolex cushion homages, but nothing from Cartier, not even the movement floating in space?

    If a new dial is all it takes the Cartier Diver in blue, which did get a mention, is massively nicer than the Panerai.

    • iamcalledryan

      You are perfectly entitled to dislike Panerai, but it sounds as though you are making assumptions about their heritage. A Panerai is a Panerai homage. Sure the Oyster was the first with a waterproof cushion case, but the Radiomir was an entirely different beast with legitimate roots.

      • commentator bob

        My understanding is that Panerai used Rolex sourced cushion cases, similar/identical to those used on actual already existing Rolex watches but with 3rd party movements, until that source dried up and Panerai started using homages to/knock-offs of the Rolex cases.

        As other dive watches evolved Panerai stuck with that design until the Italian government no longer considered it acceptable, at which point Panerai switched to the consumer market and was eventually discovered by Sly Stallone.

        • iamcalledryan

          Lol, great paraphrased history of Panerai.

          • commentator bob

            Panerai in two sentences. Stay tuned for my one sentence history of Hublot.

  • Mark Baran

    So Ariel; why did you leave out the Parmigiani “Genequand” escapement prototype? That seems to me to be the most interesting watch from the show. Easily in the top ten.

    • Ariel Adams

      I think you answered your own question in there – and that is because the Parmigiani Sefine isn’t ready for prime time and isn’t going to be for sale in 2016.

      • Mark Baran

        So that makes it less of a phenomenon than a bunch of remakes? With all due respect, there is nothing else anywhere near the Sefine that came out of that entire show.

  • DanW94

    Thanks for the round-up and all the reviews of the last week! Here are a few others that could have easily occupied a seat at the Top 10 table; Cartier Astromysterieux, the Richard Lange Jumping Seconds, the HYT H2 and the Jules Audemars Openwork. Overall, some great looking (and performing) watches presented.

  • 2sly

    Only selecting a top 10 is a difficult task but that list definitely misses the Cartier stamp on it. The Cartier Astromysterieux was a key show-stopper this year! the Drive also (even if it did get a nod). Glorious year for the brand.

    The MB&F Sherman clock would also deserve a spot :p

    • Ariel Adams

      The Cartier stuff was nice but we can’t put everything “nice” in the list. If you go out and get a Cartier Drive or an Astromysterieux you aren’t making a bad choice. We just felt a few other products narrowly beat them to a list of 10.

      • 2sly

        Making it indeed a difficult task to choose just 10 😉

  • jj eight

    My top would include:
    – MB&F HM6 for the creativity
    – Cartier Drive and RM 067-01 for the elegance
    – Audemars Double Balance Wheel for the sport watch (still in steel)
    – Roger Dubuis for the glamour
    – Kari Voutilainen for the Tradition
    – Van Cleef for its poesy
    I feel the other brands were really cautious and clever to launch re-editions of past models (Panerai, VC, IWC, JLC, LS …). This is another year of transition, expecting a better economic climate.
    Let’s wait for next Basel.

    • commentator bob

      AP double balance wheel is definitely an interesting new technology.

  • Richard Baptist

    I would take out the Vacheron and the Panerai and replace it with the Cartier Drive and the DB 25 World traveler from De Bethune. Other than those two, the list looks good. Just my opinion.

  • Marius

    I have the utmost respect for the ABTW staff, but why did this blog bother to attend the SIHH when most of the articles were merely presenting the specifications of these so-called new watches, specs that I can easily find on the brands` websites. As Shane Griffin from Wound for Life asked, where are the personal points of view, where are the critical opinions?

    Being able to see and handle all those watches in person should also enable you to write what you think about that watch, and to present its shortcomings as well. For instance, if I like IWC, I don`t need to read 15 articles that all say the same thing, I can simply check the IWC site.

    Lastly, I know that the ABTW staff loves and is passionate about watches, but most of the SIHH coverage gave me the impression that ABTW is acting like the marketing department of the Richemont Group. Most articles were written in a bland and very neutral manner, presenting all the watches in a very positive way, as if your prime concern was not to upset the brands.

    • iamcalledryan

      ABTW has always basically brought new releases to our attention, and most of us are grown up enough to make our own judgements without being spoon-fed them. So you wish they were more critical and negative, fine. Ariel is one of the more outspoken voices here, to simply trash talk the industry might please you but it would alienate the majority of people here who come to admire watches. This is SIHH, it’s a flurry of releases. To sit back and critically review one or two peices would mean not sharing the many others in time so they miss out. I would love to read more about them, but you will see that those reviews come in the next few weeks.

      “Most articles were written in a bland and neutral manner, presenting all the watches in a very positive way, as if your prime concern was not to upset the brands.”

      Or it’s almost as if they are really enthusiastic about watches – imagine it!

      • Marius

        Please indicate where I have said that ABTW should be negative. I argued that they should express their own opinions and be critical, I don`t remember having said anything about being negative.

        The argument about being spoon-fed is a bit weak, in my opinion, because if you can make your own judgements without the opinion of others, there is no need to read watch blogs, you can simply check the manufacturers` website for new models. Most brands will give you all the info you need regarding their new releases.

        • iamcalledryan

          The very assumption that they do not express their own opinions and are not critical, or that they are an extension of Richemont marketing, suggests you expect something a little less up-beat and enthusiastic from them.

          The success of blogs like this are specifically because most watch lovers prefer not to trawl through the manufacturer websites or sign up to their press releases. This is a place for accumulated new release news (like SIHH coverage) and other opinion pieces (of which there are plenty here). It’s convenient and seems to suit the very large readership so perhaps you, rather than those who appreciate this site, should be going to the manufacturers websites?

          • Marius

            Less up-beat and enthusiastic does not mean negative and trash talking. Please, don’t put words in my mouth.

          • iamcalledryan

            Ok, so let’s just say that you expect “critical opinions” from them.

            Imagine an actual news outlet. You are in the obituaries, or the AP wire, and expecting investigative journalism.

            You seem to consistently expect the type of editorial content that should only represent a small corner of any given media outlet, and is actually just as much a threat to integrity as industry bias. The best way to alienate your readership is to consistently put your own personal bias into it. There is a reason why editorial content gets fire-walled in a newspaper.

            Critical opinion might be enjoyable content to you, but here in this article? Anyone who knows what SIHH is would not expect it, the whole event would pass you by if you did anything other than take some shots and post the vital statistics. Not to mention your criticism of ABTW insinuates some kind of underlying objective truth that simply doesn’t exist.

            I dare say most people couldn’t care less to know what is WRONG with these new releases in a journalist’s opinion. In SIHH, BaselWorld, is all about the novelty eye candy.

          • speedy

            Agreed. I mostly agree with the w4l article but I think ABTW is not among the ones to blame. Some purely informational news are fine, as long as there are also some in-depth articles and/or some subjective articles too. Your comparison with general newspapers is relevant.

            A famous example of “too much bias” is the french watch blog Business Montres. It very often has very clever and unusual insights about watches and the watch industry, but the author’s critical and pretentiously “I-told-you-so” attitude makes it a real pain to read, and his pessimistic and negative tone is so constant that it makes it sometimes hard to believe. All of this even hides the really interesting ideas of the blog.

            In medio stat virtus, as they say…

          • Marius

            My dear iamcalledryan, personal bias, this great enemy of publications, doesn’t only refer to negative comments, you can also have a positive bias, meaning that you take a mediocre product and present it in a very positive, up-beat manner.

            However, it seems that you are only concerned with the negative bias, if a crappy watch is presented in a very positive manner than that’s perfectly fine, isn’t it? According to you, the journalists are not biased, but simply enthusiastic, aren’t they?

            So, if bias is such a dangerous phenomenon, please show me your comments where you openly criticized a Hodinkee or ABTW article for being too positive and laudative towards a watch that clearly wasn’t the best. When ABTW argued that the Hublot Unico movements were up there with the best, did you say anything? Why not, since it clearly is positive bias.

          • iamcalledryan

            No need to show you anything, I am among the people here who enjoy watches, and like reading about them, not to mention can tell which watch I like based on its merits alone. It is not up to me to “prove” to you that this place is what it is. Good luck with that chip on your shoulder, or uncovering the truth that watches are more mediocre than the language of the article. You seem to be unable to untangle the “truth” from your own subjective views on watches. No manner of condescension and passive aggression towards Hodinkee or ABTW will rid you of it I fear.

          • Marius

            Yes, I like enthusiast and admiration, but didn’t you just explain me that a watch blog should, akin to a newspaper, simply deliver the news without being biased or critical, so as not to alienate the audience? Now you’re telling me the exact opposite. I am really confused.

          • iamcalledryan

            That’s apparent. You are the one expecting editorial and investigative journalism, I’m here for the watches.

          • Marius

            You see, it’s very easy! You don’t need to write five long comments explaining how watch blogs should operate. One sentence is enough. But please, tell them to do something about that enthusiasm, too much of it might give the wrong impression.

          • iamcalledryan

            Nor do you need to list all of the watches available for less than the one being reviewed in every article. For most, the reply from Ariel alone would be enough, but some people appear totally resilient to taking on board new information. If I have learnt one thing from this, it’s to completely ignore you.

          • Marius

            I’m pleased to read that, thanks to me, you have learned something new. I don’t get compliments too often. You’re welcome.

    • Ariel Adams

      This is one of those situations where I am inclined to see if I can replicate one of those Star Trek Vulcan mind melds and put my hands on your forehead to allow you to experience what it is that we experience at these shows. It is entirely possible that you’ve logically surmised what you did from a detached perspective but it would not accurately sum up our coverage or the context there of. First you need to understand that we quite literally push our selves (both on-sight and off-sight team members) to the fullest degree possible in order to cover the show as best as possible. Really full in-depth coverage is something that we save for later articles, reviews, and deeper analysis. Our goal at the show is to spend 8-10 hours in meetings. Capture media, edit media, and then post those products which we are the most excited about. We simply don’t waste our time on anything but the most interesting products – so yea, we are covering what we like.

      For the most part the attending brands had some really strong products with little feeling like it just doesn’t totally make sense. Our chief complaint (all the time) is pricing which is anywhere from a bit high to totally disconnected from the value of a product. We try to mention this when we can but it begins to get old when it becomes clear that pretty much everything we see at SIHH is “luxury priced.” That said the products we choose to cover right away are those that excite us and that we feel should excite consumers. Other products which we don’t cover hands-on are probably those that we need a bit more time to consider and cover later with a bit more of a critical angle – and they do exist. The Piaget hybrid mechanical quartz watch is a good example for having a cool movement with an execution that for many people leave’s a lot to be desired. Richemont has no input in our coverage nor are we trying to make our hosts specifically satisfied with any of our content. Thanks for reading and if you have the opportunity to experience the show in our eyes (we are hiring watch trade show sherpas), you’ll probably have a lot more of an understanding of why we do what we do and how it all comes to together (extreme effort and all).

      • commentator bob

        I do not expect full reviews from SIHH, but given that many of the recent articles are likely written in advance of SIHH and are only being relased with the embargo dates more live pictures would be nice. For example the beautiful sunburst dial on the new blue dial Cartier Diver, of which only one site has picutures.

        Also, more full disclosure as has become the norm in the auto review sites. E.g. any hotels, flights or meals covered and if SIHH, unlike Basel, is invite only disclosure of that fact.

        BTW have some nice suits and a DLSR, and after some high end champage even up for saying some nice things about Panerai.

        • You mean this dial? Ok so now it is on ABTW too.

          But yes, you are more than right in demanding all the information you mention in your reply,

          I mean, we don’t pay such a high monthly suscription to this site to get such crappy reports do we. Ariel, you cheeky sod, get your butt to work already!

      • Sherpas? I’d settle for a Rascal Scooter (bad knees) but it would never make it to the 2nd or 3rd floor of the booths at BaselWorld (sigh).

        • Larry Holmack

          I am right with you on the scooter!!! I’ve been bone-on-bone in my left knee since 1999….and have to wear a 3 quarter leg brace just to walk anymore. But…I love to be able to go to a big show like that….and pray that they had elevators for the upper floors of the show!!

          Oh…BTW Ariel….I wish they would have allowed you guys to record some video footage of the event. Some interviews with some of the company presidents and other big wigs would have been really nice! Oh…was IWC giving out smaller replicas of the WWII era fighter plane? Just wondering…it would have been something cool to have brought home from the event….other than a free $1.05 million dollar Richard Mille! Otherwise…it was a really well written article that I enjoyed reading in between NFL Conference Championship games!

          • I’ve not been to SIHH but at BaselWorld there are escalators in Hall 1 and elevators in Hall 2. But there is a lot of walking within the halls and between them (5 halls plus “The Palace” which is a temp structure where some of the coolest brands are). A scooter would not be practical, but I can dream. Both of my knees are bone on bone since ’83 (on the X-rays you see a gap a playing card could not fit in), so I’m with you on the pain of just moving around. BaselWorld is amazing and crazy in its own way – but you have to have access inside the booths. Otherwise you can only stare at the showcases on the outside of the booths (like window shopping at a mall). The action happens inside the booths, so brand access is crucial. As a casual visitor (not press and not a retail/distributor buyer) I would not even go. Cheers.

          • Larry Holmack

            Ouch….one bad leg is all I have. Luckily…my right leg has never had to have any type of surgery.

      • Boogur T. Wang

        Just call me Tenzing Norgay.
        Travel arrangements can be made. ?

  • Raymond Wilkie

    I would stand out like a sore thumb at such a gathering. I don’t even have a suit. And I would get throw out anyway for licking the display cases.

    • awildermode

      Yeah. Way above my tax bracket.

  • wallydog2

    Being well brought up, I always carry a roll of paper towels for wiping display cases upon which I have drooled.

    • Raymond Wilkie

      Thanks for the tip : )

  • Well, there are some excellent, expensive-looking show cases. It’s certainly a big industry given the number of suited gentry and lovely young things wandering about texting, drinking coffee etc. One forgets about the billions of dollars created by watch sales annually. I’d certainly love to attend one of these shows but stopped wearing a suit years ago.
    Thanks ‘Ariel for your comprehensive article.

    • Press is not bound to wearing suits (at least not at BaselWorld anyway).

  • HectorAsuipe

    The SIHH is hard to digest as a “normal” person who collects watches to wear and admire with some regularity.
    I actually like that Panerai quite a bit; I’d take it over the RM any day, even if the latter were only $20k.

  • ??????

    IWC and Panerai additions look very nice imo

  • Claudiu

    The guy from the large Lange & Sohne watch photo:

    http://ablogtowatch.kinsta.cloud/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/SIHH-2016-Event-Fair-Atmosphere-Ambient-B-Roll-Broll-aBlogtoWatch-6.jpg

    , seems to do a macro photoshot of the other guy’s crotch.

    Sorry for the offtopic, carry on.

  • PleaseSpellRoman4AsIV

    Well, any top 10 list will always be debuted, but I guess that is the point. Thanks for the ABTW for the coverage – I still need to finish reading some of the articles posted here, which for me highlights the level; of work that you put into this. Keep on the good work.

  • iamcalledryan

    Grande Lange 1 Moon Phase Lumen!

  • commentator bob

    1. Piaget Emperador Coussin XL 700P: Not quite as technically impressive as the Seiko implimentation (the Seiko “glide wheel” turns eight times per second – Piaget’s rotates 5.33 times per second), and very deficient in execution (no second hand on on technology famous for a smooth second hand and seconds per month accuracy), this is still by far the most important release from SIHH 2016. Adoption of Seiko’s spring drive technology by not just a Swiss make but a group as big as Richemont is a pardigm shift. Nothing from SIHH is keeping Swatch Group and LVMH awake except for this release. Rolex may even take note.

    2. Rotonde De Cartier Astromystérieux: Cartier re-invented the tourbillon. Instead of the escapement rotating every minute the whole movement rotates every hour. Using historic Cartier mystery watch concepts to do that rotation floating in space. This would be number 1 if Piaget had not turned the Swiss watch industry on its side.

    3. Panerai Lo Scienziato Luminor 1950 Tourbillon GMT Titanio: A movement made using 3D printing (Direct Laser Sintering – you will not be able the replicate this with the thing you bought for a couple hundred that uses plastic wire). As much as I am not a Panerai fan this is a big deal and it will be interesting to see 3D printing spread across Richemont and the overall industry.

    4. Senfine Concept Watch From Parmigiani Fleurier: A new movement is not nothingl. I don’t really care that it is a concept because every $100,000+ SIHH watch is effectively a concept in terms of delivery times and thorough development.

    5. IWC Mark XVIII: A manufacture automatic mechanical three-hand date watch for under $4K is really exciting for anyone that has never heard of Hamilton, Tissot, Longines, Swatch, Certina, Rado, Mido, Seiko, Orient, Citizen, Zodiac, Vostok, Sea-Gull and a number of other companies. In all seriousness Richement coming to terms on price and putting an IWC under $5K is noteworthy.

    • Chaz

      You sure about the MK XVIII being a “manufacture” movement?

      • commentator bob

        You are correct, IWC uses Sellita. The Mark XVIII is not a true manufacture pilot like a Hamilton, Seiko or Orient.

  • Josh G

    Interesting that I find the IWC to be a “bargain” when compared to the six-digit prices of the other watches in this list. Beautiful watches that I’d love to see in person, but I’m sure I’d be escorted out of this show in my pedestrian Pelagos.

    • Chaz

      Philistine!

  • AGrogToSnatch

    I have the utmost respect for the ABTW staff, but why did this blog bother to attend the SIHH when most of the articles were merely presenting the specifications of these so-called new watches, specs that I can easily find on the brands` websites. As Shane Griffin from Wound for Life asked, where are the personal points of view, where are the critical opinions?

    Being able to see and handle all those watches in person should also enable you to write what you think about that watch, and to present its shortcomings as well. For instance, if I like IWC, I don`t need to read 15 articles that all say the same thing, I can simply check the IWC site.

    Lastly, I know that the ABTW staff loves and is passionate about watches, but most of the SIHH coverage gave me the impression that ABTW is acting like the marketing department of the Richemont Group. Most articles were written in a bland and very neutral manner, presenting all the watches in a very positive way, as if your prime concern was not to upset the brands.

    Greetings from Marius…