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Apple Watch Series 4 Features Most Comprehensive Health & Spec Update To Date

Apple Watch Series 4 Features Most Comprehensive Health & Spec Update To Date Watch Releases

Today we visited the Steve Jobs Theater on Apple’s sprawling new Cupertino campus to see the company formally debut the newly designed and re-engineered Apple Watch Series 4 and its most comprehensive set of updates since its first iteration launched in 2015. As widely speculated, the Apple Watch Series 4 is built with a slimmer, albeit wider case, a bigger screen and a new digital crown with haptic feedback. But the real surprise here is an impressive twin-sensor “ECG” electrical heart rate monitor, yielding a depth of fitness tracking, and long-term wellness monitoring capabilities that have not been tapped by any consumer-ready wearable device to date. These updates solidify this fourth generation as far more than a timekeeping or communications device, but one that has the potential to usher in the lifestyle and behavioral changes promised three years ago. Is the term “watch” finally a misnomer? It’s starting to look that way.

Apple Watch Series 4 Features Most Comprehensive Health & Spec Update To Date Watch Releases

Apple Watch Series 4 Features Most Comprehensive Health & Spec Update To Date Watch Releases

In the keynote’s opening statements, Apple CEO Tim Cook reasserted Apple’s mission as one to make products more personal, and create a profound impact on lives. For three product generations, the Apple Watch has loosely followed that mission, but the broad necessity of that impact – comparable to other universally impactful products, like the iPhone – has been subjective at best. Today’s keynote was all about adding features that will prove to be of absolute necessity for many. Thus, it’s important to recognize that the newest changes make it much less of a watch, and more of a genuine wellness management tool – or “an intelligent guardian for your health.”

Apple Watch Series 4 Features Most Comprehensive Health & Spec Update To Date Watch Releases

THE #1 WATCH IN THE WORLD

Yep, Apple was sure to trumpet this boast-worthy feat: the Apple Watch is the top selling watch in the world. In 2015, Apple was 2nd only behind Rolex, but now, with over 33,000,000 Apple Watches sold to date, Apple has taken the first spot with ease. To put things into perspective, the entire Swiss watch industry has exported 24.3 million watches in 2017. If the Apple Watch continues its gain in popularity, in the near future we could see Apple ship more watches than the entire Swiss watch industry – although there is still going to be a considerable difference if not in volume, then in value of shipped products. Another bit of food for thought: Apple is close to having sold its 2 billionth (!) iOS product, and although that includes a wide range of products from iPods through iPads to, of course, the iPhone, one could still argue that there are hundreds of millions of iOS users out there who are yet to be convinced by the prospect of wearing an iOS device on their wrist… And so Apple has been dedicating vast resources to tirelessly improving the Apple Watch, an effort reflected by the hardware and software updates of the Apple Watch Series 4. Let’s see these now.

Apple Watch Series 4 Features Most Comprehensive Health & Spec Update To Date Watch Releases

Apple Watch Series 4 Features Most Comprehensive Health & Spec Update To Date Watch Releases

NEW CASE & SCREEN DESIGN

From a visible standpoint, both sizes of the Apple Watch Series 4 grew to 40mm and 44mm from the 38mm and 42mm sizes of all previous Apple Watch generations. Consequently, the Apple Watch Series 4 now houses a 32% or 35% larger, “edge-to-edge” screen, meaning the wearer can now view and receive more information in maps, photo, calendar or pretty much any other app with more than a few words of text. All this also allowed for a new modular watch face with a maximum of eight “complications,” further adaptable between featuring multiple contact, health/activity, or timekeeping functionalities. Three new dynamic watch faces can also be selected: fire, water, and vapor, for a less overwhelming appearance.

Apple Watch Series 4 Features Most Comprehensive Health & Spec Update To Date Watch Releases

Apple has equipped the new Series 4 case with its new WatchOS5, built atop a 64-bit dual core processor which is twice as fast as the outgoing generation. It’s also fitted with a redesigned speaker that’s 50% louder to make phone calls and other audible interactions more convenient and successful, with the microphone now replaced to the other side to minimize echo and make our voice sound more clear on the other end of the call. Add to this a completely redesigned digital crown that now houses haptic feedback to make navigating between lists and menus that much more reassuring and easy. Yet another refinement that will almost certainly get buried in today’s tsunami of news and releases is the new case-back which is ceramic and sapphire crystal, enabling improved cellular reception for calls and data usage.

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Lots of “little things” which in fact must have been a pain to engineer – even for Apple, and yet have been implemented in an effort to make the long-term, real world performance of the Apple Watch that much better. We can’t help but compare all the effort dedicated to all these areas to the majority of established Swiss luxury watch brands who are, let’s be kind, much less eager to improve this many – or even one – aspect of their volume-selling watches. Rolex is still king of the hill with bracelet and case design solutions it had come up with decade(s) ago.

Apple Watch Series 4 Features Most Comprehensive Health & Spec Update To Date Watch Releases

SUPER-DEEP WELLNESS MONITORING

The Apple Watch has always been a tool for everyday connectivity, with fitness and health monitoring each as secondary, albeit much welcome and constantly fine-tuned capabilities. On the Apple Watch Series 4, the latter take center stage, thanks to a pair of electrical heart sensors in the digital crown and sapphire crystal case-back, as well as an accelerometer that analyzes wrist trajectory to detect falls (one of the leading causes of injury worldwide). In case of a detected fall, the Watch pulls up the option to make an SOS call with just one single swipe and if senses no movement for a minute after the fall, it will automatically send out an SOS message including the person’s location. A feature better to have and not need it, than need one and not have it, right?

Apple Watch Series 4 Features Most Comprehensive Health & Spec Update To Date Watch Releases

Apple Watch Series 4 Features Most Comprehensive Health & Spec Update To Date Watch Releases

With that, we have arrived to what is the most important update of them all:

The truly groundbreaking revelation that pushes the Apple Watch Series 4 into persistent, all-important device territory is its new heart rate monitoring, which can send alerts when the heart rate is too low or too high, as well as detect abnormal heart rhythms. The Series 4 also introduces electrocardiogram capability – making it the world’s first ECG product that is offered over-the-counter directly to consumers. It enables the wearer to now perform an ECG anytime, anywhere – simply by starting the ECG app and placing a finger over the digital crown. All the ECG reports can then be saved and shared with the wearer’s doctor for long-term heart health monitoring and analysis. In addition to blessing by the American Heart Association, the Series 4 has been approved by the FDA – another pair of firsts Apple has claimed for a consumer wearable, begging the question – is this a watch? Or a medical device?

Apple Watch Series 4 Features Most Comprehensive Health & Spec Update To Date Watch Releases

MOST CAPABLE WATCH OS YET

Connectivity and capability are the focal points of the new Watch OS, making the Series 4 a more comprehensive fitness and communications device, in addition to the wellness monitoring. Standouts include new apps like Walkie Talkie – a watch-to-watch tool that enables Apple Watch wearers to communicate directly with each other via cellular or WiFi connection, or new workout types like yoga and hiking more accurately track calories burned. Marathon runners will also appreciate the new battery life – now extended to 18 hours, or full GPS tracking up to 6 hours. Siri has also been improved in the Series 4, offering more voice command shortcuts to navigate user-preferred apps, like podcast search and playback.

Apple Watch Series 4 Features Most Comprehensive Health & Spec Update To Date Watch Releases

MORE THAN A WATCH

As the Apple Watch seems to be completing a long-term vision for the platform that asserts itself as a true communications and wellness device, so expect plenty more news on aBlogtoWatch around this new release once we are able to test it. In the meantime, the watch will be available in three aluminum finishes (silver, gold, and space grey), as well as a premium collection in stainless steel. It’s also worth noting for those with a Series 3 strap collection, all straps for the current Series 3 are fully compatible with the Series 4 – with new options from partners Hermes and Nike – the latter of which features reflective nylon yarn. The GPS Apple Watch Series 4 starts at $399, and jumps to $499 for the cellular variant. Those who held out on the Series 3 watch will appreciate that the price has been reduced to $279. Par for the course, the Apple Watch Series 4 can be ordered starting this week on September 14th, and will begin shipping one week later on the 21st. Visit apple.com for more details on the Apple Watch Series 4.

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  • SuperStrapper

    Apple has sold 33MM watches, but how many series 1 buyers are still wearing it? How many consumers make up that number, I assume the same people keep buying updated versions, leaving the old ones to rot. I bet a lot of people that bought a Rolex in the 80s or 90s are still wearing it, even if they bought a newer Rolex at some point.

    Can a series 3 watch be updated to series 4 software? If not I laff. Series 3 isnt even a year old yet. Yay my old straps will fit and that good because they were really overpriced, but that’s like saying hey weve updated pants your old pants dont… pant the way that they should but in pants 2.0 you’ll be pleased to know that you can use your old belt. Now throw put your old pants and buy new ones. Today please.

    • David Bredan

      How many Watch Series 1 buyers are still using their phones from 2015? We both know that this is a piece of technology and the concept of replacing a (relatively cheap) piece of technology within a few years has been embraced by hundreds of millions of people in the world – even if phones these days cost more than ever in recent memory. The moralities of that go way beyond smartwatches, but let’s not forget that Apple has fine-tuned the WatchOS to make it run smoother and faster even of Series 1 watches – hence extending their life cycle. If you wanted an Apple Watch and wore it for around 2 years, it cost you roughly $175 per year to own. That’s $15 a month to own something that works as a watch and acts as an impressive piece of wearable technology, if that’s your thing. There’s got to be big enough of a market for that in the world, irrespective whether you or I want to be part of it.

      Your bet for Rolex buyers still wearing their 80s/90s watches is a safe bet to make when they have faced little to no temptation to replace the luxury watch they had purchased. There have been a disappointing lack of truly impressive technical advancements in the “affordable luxury segment” – with most new features failing to justify the stratospheric price hikes in the eyes of many ordinary watch buyers (i.e. non-watch-snobs/enthusiasts)… And you picking Rolex is still the best case scenario, as Rolex has done way more than most others in the sub-$10k luxury watch segment to justify an upgrade than basically any other brand that I can think of perhaps with the exception of Omega who have also come a long way with materials/design/movements.
      As such, when you’re facing thousands of dollars in depreciation and/or replacing an item that you cherish and have many memories attached to, you’ll be much less likely to replace it than you would be with a piece of technology you have long ago accepted to be a consumable product. Just my .02 in an effort to share the flip side.

    • PR

      I am not sure if you are saying that’s a good thing or a bad thing. Apple has best of both worlds, repeat sales on a very frequent basis AND value retention relative to other tech brands. I’m sure the Swiss would love it if their customers bought their new releases every year and ditched the older ones and they still held value, but no, that’s just not going to happen unless they can innovate at the speed of tech and still maintain brand identity and cachet.selling one watch to one customer to keep for life is not going to be enough for most brands.

      • Joe

        Apple might have repeat sales, but how many people will have more than 1 Apple Watch in their “collection” at once?
        Ok maybe a few because they have a generations-old Apple Watch that they can no longer sell.

        On the other hand, how many people have more than 1 watch that is still current that they rotate on a frequent basis?

    • Jonny Bravo

      All Apple Watch series, except Series 0 (1st generation launched in 2014-2015) can be updated to the latest Watch OS version (5). Apple is known for supporting their products for much longer than anybody else. The life expectancy of an Apple Watch is around 5 years, mainly due to the battery degradation. So if I’d buy a new Apple Watch every 3 years (at $400/pc), I would be able to buy 20 iterations to spend the same kind of money as a new Rolex. That would be 60 years worth of latest smartwatch tech to get even with buying a Rolex.

      • SuperStrapper

        Too bad it’s not a watch tho.

        • Jonny Bravo

          Well, it depends how do we define a watch. Is it a watch if it has a microprocessor? If not then the old calculator Seiko watches are not to be considered as watches.

          But in the end it doesn’t really matter if it’s a watch or not. What matters is that it takes the same space on the wrist so we are made to take a decision: what would I wear today? Most people (non-enthusiasts) are choosing the smartwatch. By the time the technology will evolve so much that even the smartwatch will become obsolete, I am afraid there won’t be a “real” watch industry to take over the wrist estate once more.

          • SuperStrapper

            Take solice in that we’ll all be dead by then.

  • PollyO

    Now, I’m a lover of mechanical watches – I wouldn’t be here otherwise – but the functionality that these are achieving for less than $500 bucks must have the traditional watch industry crapping themselves. How long before the luxury watch industry becomes one of those niche hobbies and not a huge industry?

    • PR

      Isn’t it already a niche hobby? Did you not see the opening splash screen stating Apple Watch is the no.1 watch in the world?

    • Raymond Wilkie

      No matter how much crap these companies throw at their gullible customers their will always be a market for true Horologists. Certain folks go on about how much money a beautiful mechanical timepiece cost. If looked after, it’s yours for life. Hopefully a nice memory might go along with it, given to you by family or just a present for yourself for reaching a goal in life.
      Strap one of these to your wrist and what have you got?…I want my comment printed so I can’t say exactly but you have nothing. A soulless piece of junk. When I see these square blank screens on people it makes me shudder.

      • Gokart Mozart

        My late grandfather’s Roamer is over 60 years old and works great and keeps time really well probably out by 5 to 10 seconds a day.

        Not bad for a watch that has probably only been serviced 1once over that time, by me to replace a broker crown, so that I could wear it on my wedding day.

        One day I will pass it on to one of my daughter’s.

      • Jonny Bravo

        The long life of mechanical watches is not a concern for the current generation. They’ve been raised and trained with expendable products. They upgrade their smartphones every 2-3 years so they don’t have a problem throwing the smartwatch after 2-3 years. Your thinking is obsolete in the current world (though I understand the environmental implications of this economy model).

        • Indeed and as one matures you often come to appreciate long lasting items that will last and not be disposed of next year. Give the millenials a break – in 20 years they may come to appreciate the finer things in life that last.

    • Framlucasse

      Since your phone does the same, but better, what’s the point?

    • Norbs K

      Come on, the watch industry is always crapping itself about anything.
      Until brain implants where we can know the exact time at any given moment, the watch industry has nothing to fear.
      Yes, it might shrink. Yes, it might become more niche as it is now.
      And come to think of it, the luxury industry is a already on life support from China as people in Western countries don’t by luxury watches that often as the new wave of Chinese millionaires.
      They were always living on borrowed time.
      But there is a huge low to mid range market, that probably will stay with us for a long time.

      You don’t have to buy a Rolex to have something that outlives an Apple Watch. My Seiko 5 already did that with it’s 4 years and still keeps great time.

      My biggest concern with this is again the yearly change. You have to buy the newest crap every time. It’s not good for mental health, it’s not good for the environment. It’s not even innovating as it did years back. It is a money making scheme riding the fitness horse.

      • Jonny Bravo

        The watch industry will shrink, not only because of the smartwatch trend but because of overproduction (as Ariel already said many times). As the industry shrinks, there will be less people servicing the mechanical watches and their services will be more expensive. This will just lead to more shrinking as the non-enthusiasts will buy less mechanical watches and instead go for quartz or smartwatches.

        I can see already many more smartwatches on the street than in previous years, so it is clear this trend will continue in the next years. And the smartwatches hit exactly in the low to mid market. Some say that the young people buying smartwatches will end up “upgrading” to mechanical watches later in life, but I doubt it. Once they become used to the features of a smartwatch, they will just keep asking for newer features rather than choose a mechanical watch. How many people still use a cell phone or a fixed line phone these days?

        • Actually the need for watch repair/service techs has gone up (due to the increase in mechanical watches since the 90s). On the other hand yes, there is no need for smart watch repair since they are a disposable item anyway (due to their annual upgrade cycle). And yes, I use my cell phone and land line daily. I just had my annual physical 2 days ago and my heart is fine fine for another year – I don’t need moment by moment monitoring so I couldn’t care less about having a heart monitor on my wrist – but that’s just me. If people want that, fine. But also fine that some of us don’t.

  • IG

    I’m waiting for Series 5 which will analyse urine and blood samples.

    • Framlucasse

      Good one. 😀

    • Gokart Mozart

      Series 6 will be a covert tracking device for illegal immigrants.

      The walkie talkie feature will be handy for those parents separated from the kids.

  • Raymond Wilkie

    Anyone want an old iWatch thingy?

  • David Bredan

    It was just a counterpoint – not an attack. Rolex was picked in the article the same way as it was in my comment: it’s the one (along with Omega, arguably) that’s probably done the most in its segment to justify an upgrade, so the absolute majority of other brands really haven’t done that much at all to encourage people to update. The designs of others in the 4-figure luxury watch segment might have changed drastically – but that’s primarily a result of fashion/trends, not technological advancements.
    We totally agree that watches are emotional items, I share that sentiment – and I’ve added in my comment above that people are used to the idea of replacing smartwatches. I didn’t mean to argue that they’ll grow attached to it. In fact, I doubt that anyone beyond the age of 17 (arbitrary number) buys an Apple Watch and seriously says to oneself “I’ll be so attached to this, emotionally.” And even if one grows attached to it, that’s OK too – on a personal note, I have some old phones that I haven’t thrown away or sold off while they were worth something. I don’t mind that I haven’t recovered X hundred dollars or even less from them, the pieces of technology I’ve grown to attached to at least a bit, I still have around somewhere. And I do mind that I can’t use them anymore (loved my Sony CMD-J6 that I still remember the model # of, apparently), but it’s the nature of technology that is to be blamed for that, not that particular piece of technology.
    Come to think of it, I might contradict myself now and say that I slightly disagree that one could never grow attached to an Apple Watch though. Perhaps the watch itself will be replaced with a newer generation, but one will want to stick to using only that particular system – and that’s exactly what Apple wants (and has achieved big, big time with the iPhone).
    Only Apple knows the % between new AW customers and those updating – but over the last ~4 years I’m sure they gathered enough data that they would have introduced rather more drastic changes to the platform if it had no customer retention – I am just thinking out loud here, i.e.: IMO 🙂

  • Cheap $80 Chinese gadget , with good marketing .

    • Framlucasse

      40 box at the most.

  • Framlucasse

    iCrap. I don’t even understand why ABTW talk about this. Because it goes on a wrist?

    • Look, we get that it’s polarizing, but let’s not forget – it’s a watch. Says so right there in the name. Plus, if it’s got our industry talking, we’re going to cover it. Simple as that. Thanks for checking in!

  • Joe

    Apologies in advance for a long response…

    I don’t think we’re disagreeing here, btw.
    From a commercial perspective, what Apple does it does amazingly well.
    In a nutshell, traditional watch manufacturers can’t compete.

    I guess the one big difference between a “tech company” and “luxury goods” is that tech needs to continue evolving to remain relevant, whereas luxury may not …and to be honest is a more long-lasting, emotional purchase that is harder to describe to those that aren’t into it.

    In contrast to the Apple Watch, I don’t think “we” (on the whole) get as excited by the latest iPhones like we used to. Once they can’t come up with new ideas and features for the Apple Watch, I think the same thing will happen to it too.
    By then I’m sure we will have moved onto AR/VR glasses or lenses and other exciting technologies 😉

    Back to traditional watches. As a buyer, would you really want to be in the race to buy the next iteration of Rolex, GS, JLC, etc every few years?
    Not to mention (taking Rolex as an example) if they did churn out newer versions of their models every few years…their brand/image will probably collapse.

    A traditional watch is one of the few remnants (relics?!) of the 20th century that I can buy and hang onto without the product becoming unusable every few years.

    Perhaps it’s inevitable that some brands (or segments of the industry) having prices overlapping with “tech” and competing for wrist space will suffer. Watches at these sorts of prices probably aren’t “luxury goods” and may only appeal to newcomers, collectors or those with a “curiosity” who aren’t willing to spend that much, initially.
    Perhaps (sadly) it’s unrealistic to expect every company to survive when watches simply aren’t an everyday necessity anymore.

    Having said all this, I also hope that companies keep iterating.
    For example as a swimmer/snorkeller/freediver, I hope that some day I won’t have to have my watch tested every 1.5~2y for water tightness.
    I think those that do iterate, innovate and offer the right quality, style, price points (and marketing) will survive, if only just.

  • Norbs K

    Went on Apple’s website to have a look at this fancy piece of garbage.
    And I was left baffled. The whole smartwatch industry is going down the fitness route.
    Don’t understand why they still call it a watch. It should be iFit, or iFitness.
    This has nothing to do with watches anymore. It is purely on fitness and closing in on the smartphone with cellular functionality.

    I wonder when this is going to bite them in the ass as there is a rising trend of accepting/celebrating obesity (not that I would approve of eating disorders and life threatening conditions, but that’s what we’re doing now). A lot of companies started to back away from using only fit people in their marketing.

    And just to prove the point how shallow this whole thing is, the site has three major points which are literally the same. Health, Fitness and Activity. These are literally one category, Apple. Just call it what it is. A FITNESS TRACKER. Thank you!

  • IG

    Series 17 will replace your proctologist.

    • I shudder to think about the strap that then holds the “watch” in place.

      • IG

        Don’t worry, it will be the finest medical-grade silicon and you’ll also get a jar of Apple Lube™ with the watch.

  • Gokart Mozart

    The walkie talkie feature is that not just the same as WhatsApp and Viber? Other apps also available.

    Except it’s worse as you can only talk to other iwrist owners.

    • “you can only talk to other iwrist owners” – it’s only for members of the Cool Kids Club.

      • Gokart Mozart

        That’s one name for them. Maybe not the one I would use 😉

        Are you back from holiday or was it just a really long physical you had?

        • I’ve been very busy with my “day job” and other projects (watches and other stuff). I plan to get back to commenting here as usual.

  • Gokart Mozart

    “In the keynote’s opening statements, Apple CEO Tim Cook reasserted Apple’s mission as one to make products more personal, and create a profound impact on lives”

    Did he say who he was talking about? Was it the sweat shop workers who work in the Chinese factories and used to have high rates of suicide?

    I do not know if they still do but maybe Apple should give there workers free watches. The heart rate monitoring and recognising falls would come in handy.

    • Norbs K

      Maybe he was referring to the fit and healthy people in their marketing campaign. Because what else would they need then a small computer on their wrist telling them how amazingly fit they are.

      Someone should make a comparison between the quality of life of a person working in one of the many Chinese factories shitting out Apple products and a person working for Seiko for example. It doesn’t even have to be Swiss luxury brand to probably see the obvious difference.

      Also would like to talk to the designers at Apple how it feels having the pressure to come up with something every flipping year, whilst the room for innovation shrinks every time. As soon as the keynote ended, they have to go back to their desks and come up with something for next year.

      • Jonny Bravo

        I can tell you that the Apple Watch helps me become more active. It never tells me how “amazingly” fit I am but motivates me to move more, in subtle ways. And you can’t argue that it’s a bad thing in today’s world, where obesity has reached epidemic levels.
        I still wear my mechanical watches when going to social events, where I don’t need notifications or other features, but that’s less and less often than before.

  • BrJean

    Wake me up when they put inside a balance spring.

  • Jonny Bravo

    Exactly my thoughts. The low to mid market supports the higher/luxury segment. Without it, the luxury segment will become real luxury in terms of pricing.

  • Jonny Bravo

    Actually people bought less desktop computers or laptops not because they don’t need to replace as often but because they use tablets and smartphones instead, making a desktop computer redundant for most but the professionals. The smartphone market is growing continuously for the last 10 years.

  • Farkbinder012

    Even If I was interested in the 44mm stainless steel model with the mesh
    band, it’s not available in the GPS only configuration. Strike one! Why
    would anyone contemplate purchasing the aluminum models? Let’s see.
    Sapphire crystals are not available on the “Sport” models. Strike two!
    The aluminum case is compromised material. The scratches and dents on
    the case and glass crystal are permanent. Strike three! Many more eye
    opening reasons to dismiss have been eloquently expressed here. Computer
    tech nerds and mechanical watches are usually a recipe for disaster.

  • Farkbinder012

    Hey aBlogtoWatch, where is my original post? Why wasn’t it added to the comments? This keeps popping up: Hold on, this is waiting to be approved by aBlogtoWatch.

    • Ahh, it was just stuck in moderation purgatory – sorry about that!
      (And thanks for joining the conversation!)

      • Farkbinder012

        Thank you, Sir.

  • Look, I get where you’re coming from with how the ‘other’ half of this device is trending, but an ECG is the absolute opposite of vanity. I’m guessing from your comment that you don’t have a heart murmur or a history of heart disease in your family, but being able to track short or long-term abnormalities in heart rhythms to predict (or get in front of) a potentially life-threatening cardiac event without necessitating repeated (and costly) trips to a doctor’s office is positively massive. Granted this feature might not be life-saving for everyone, but that’s not the point.
    Plus, it’ll send an SOS message if you trip and fall down the stairs 😉 That ain’t vanity!

    • Lincolnshire Poacher

      Zach I don’t dispute that for a moment. Heart patients and people who may have congenital heart problems may derive some benefit from constant monitoring.
      The Atlantic has an interesting article about it. A Doctor’s view of it’s utility, or not.

      But really I’m just just practicing. I’m against enthusiasts, and for levity. Honestly, I’ve never been known to say, “Things we’re much better in my day” 😉

  • If they keep calling it a “watch,” we’ll keep covering it 😉

    • Gokart Mozart

      In that case pocket watches are still more appropriate then this and they are not full of plastic. 😉

  • Ulysses31

    I wonder if Apple hasn’t “jumped the shark” with this latest iteration of the iWatch. Including an ECG, while somewhat clever, will only be of real use to a comparatively small demographic such as the elderly and those with heart disease. Far, far more useful and life-changing would have been a sensor that could monitor blood sugars continuously – something Tim Cook has been playing with for some time. That would be truly revolutionary and improve the lives of tens of millions of people, assuming it wasn’t priced beyond the reach of ordinary folk.

  • Abdul Kalik Abdul Razak

    It’s not apple creation it’s just a copy and claim as their’s.. Those ECG

  • Joe

    Given that I’m not really of the collector mindset, I guess I find this hard to envisage.
    All I can say is “maybe” 🙂

  • Yep and it’s a nice hobby!

  • hatster

    ……and another round of Apple watches become obsolete and are abandoned to cupboards and drawers…….. sadly not to gather the desirability of traditional watches that mounts over time.

  • cluedog12

    The species hasn’t changed, only the tools at our disposal/distraction and the amount of leisure time afforded by automation.

  • cluedog12

    Guys, are we just giving up on the mechanical heart rate monitor? The Swiss shouldn’t cede the lifestyle wearables space to the tech sector just yet.

  • You’re absolutely correct – we’re reporting on this in our hands-on, due out shortly.

  • Ulysses31

    It is indeed the most interesting feature, and I don’t deny the potential of such a device. I just find it questionable putting it on a luxury watch that is probably out of the reach of people who would most need it. If Apple created a medical devices division, they could do a lot of good by making such technology accessible to all. I’m sorry about your friend. Perhaps such a device could have helped him. There are a number of examples of athletes who suffer from these problems despite their normally good health.

    • I’m not a smartwatch hater but I’m no lover either. The need to be able to read messages, chat or browse the net on my wrist seems ridiculous. I would however like a simple instrumented bracelet or something, capable of monitoring my health stats.

  • Boris N. Natasha

    Love my mechanical watches and I love my Apple watches as well. I wear a Series 1 to sleep every night, I wear my Series 3 when I work from home and swim/bike/run. I will wear my Series 4 whenever I want because at $500 these watches deliver me tangible value and improve my life… just as my mechanical watches do with a GMT when I travel for business across time zones, Diver on exotic vacations, and Dress for dinner out. Both smart and mechanical have equal value to me.

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