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Christopher Ward C8 P7350 Chronometer Watch

Christopher Ward C8 P7350 Chronometer Watch Watch Releases

As of late, Christopher Ward has taken to generating quite a number of special, limited-edition watches. Some of these have taken the form of honoring military planes of the past, and yet others have delved into the realm of automobile racing, with some of those pieces actually incorporating metal from a specific vintage race car. Now, with their release of the Christopher Ward C8 P7350 Chronometer, we have a watch that carries metal that flew in the Battle of Britain.

Given that the Battle of Britain happened in 1940, you might be tempted to think that they simply harvested the metal from a boneyard somewhere. That’s actually not the case. There is still a Spitfire – known as P7350, the 14th one to come off the line – that is still in the air as part of the RAF’s Battle of Britain Memorial Flight. As you might imagine, they would not just give up pieces of such a historical plane willy-nilly. Instead, these bits come from a restoration of the plane that occurred back in 2008, and show up in the stamped insert on the caseback.

Christopher Ward C8 P7350 Chronometer Watch Watch Releases

Christopher Ward C8 P7350 Chronometer Watch Watch Releases

The Spitfire P7350 in flight

While I cannot say I am particularly drawn to the watch by the plane it honors, I do like the overall presentation. The dial on the 44mm Christopher Ward C8 P7350 Chronometer is based on a Smith’s MK II, a clock that was in the cockpit of the P7, which saw the brand working to match the typeface and coloration of the indices. This is a nod to historical accuracy that I particularly like in watches of this sort. As an added benefit, you end up with alternating lume colors as well, which gives some visual interest to the watch – and is in fact something that would be interesting to see more frequently.

Christopher Ward C8 P7350 Chronometer Watch Watch Releases

Driving the vintage-inspired aviation dial is none other than Christopher Ward’s in-house Calibre SH21, which is a great in-house movement from the relatively young British brand. We have seen it showing up in more of their higher-end pieces (with more on the movement here), and it makes sense that it is used in the Christopher Ward C8 P7350 Chronometer. Given that only 75 examples of this particular watch will be made, you will want to move on getting your pre-order in, should you be so inclined. Oh, and the price for this piece of history? The of the Christopher Ward C8 P7350 Chronometer comes in at a price of £3495 / $4800 / €4500. For those with extra deep pockets, do note that there is indeed a limit of one per customer. christopherward.com

Christopher Ward C8 P7350 Chronometer Watch Watch Releases

Tech Specs from Christopher Ward

  • Diameter: 44mm
  • Height: 12.3mm
  • Calibre: SH21 chronometer
  • Vibrations: 28.800 per hour
  • Timing tolerance: +6/-4 seconds per day
  • Case: 316L Stainless steel (PVD)
  • Water resistance: 5 bar
  • Dial Colour: Black
  • Strap width: 22mm
  • Strap length: 124mm x 82mm

About the Author

Patrick Kansa (@PatrickWatches) is a BI and Data Solutions developer by day, and a [redacted] by night. When he's not compiling crazy huge data sets to drive data visualizations, he's spending time with his family, reading up on fascinating watches, whipping up something in the kitchen, or trying to graduate from being a professional amateur photographer.

The photography ties directly into another passion - watches. This is a more recent development, and has only grown since he began writing about them in 2011. He's loves the fact that we can carry these micro machines on our wrist without a second thought, and looks at watches through the lens of practicality, uniqueness, and relative value.

And after all of that? Well, we're not saying he is Batman, but we've never seen him and Batman in the same room.

Comments

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  • henryus

    Alternating lume colors on hands would be most welcome, especially on tritium watches. During day light, telling different hands is no problem. However, in the dark, the two hands look very similar because only the tritium elements show, and their difference in length is visible only in close inspection. Minute hand being of different color, say yellow, would make it much easier to differentiate the two hands.

  • I_G

    henryus But under pressure like when in the office your boss attacks you from behind during desk flight you can mix up the two colours?

  • thornwood36

    I would give my $5,000 to the red cross

  • Chad Stevenson

    As a proud owner of a C11 MSL, I like the quality and finish CWL products offer, however, I liked the price point too. Any plans for CWL to offer this (minus the Spitfire parts) to people with champagne tastes and a beer budget?

  • Phoenikz

    44mm … The End.

  • DG Cayse

    thornwood36 Or another legitimate and worthy charitable organization.

    CW has certain hit the marketing stride with a strong push.
    I like their watches, even as I watch their prices increase, but do note their rather heavy-handedness of late.

  • DG Cayse

    henryus I would also like to see some lume on the seconds complication.

  • mgennone

    Christopher Ward must hang out at the same pubs as Bremont brothers.

  • somethingnottaken

    The alternating lume colours make this watch standout (at least a little bit…) from the plethora of other pilot watches on the market. The overall design is a pleasant variation on the pilot watch theme, and the movement is interesting – if they offered a non limited edition at a lower price point (and presumably without the piece of Spitfire) I’d be tempted.

  • iamcalledryan

    I far prefer the model that they launched the SH21 in.

  • Grinnie Jax

    Nice watch, crazy tag. You may get a pilot watch from IWC for 5000$.

  • 5803822

    A very reasonable price for a unique product with a decent “in house” movement – how many examples of this do we get on ABTW ?

  • Jimxxx

    Would much prefer a real photo than these renderings.

  • Meh, it’s kinda ugly and all over the place design wise: a picture of the Smiths cockpit clock it is trying to emulate might help. The lume shot is pretty cool though.

  • hatster

    I like – and own – a CW watch. I think they have been smart on the design front, catering for a wide range of buyers and at a range of price points. This is not a favorite, but then they produce watches like the C7 Rapide Chonometer. I think they are on to something and with the addition of an in-house movement, looks like the Brits are getting their act together.

  • Yaax Arr

    Expensive but great look!

  • MichaelSchafbuch

    somethingnottaken agree 100%

  • bichondaddy

    Very nice….but a bit pricey for me.

  • I_G

    SuperStrapper I’m pretty sure the Smiths clock wasn’t PVD coated 😀

  • No, but it very well may have been painted black/dark to match the panel it was set in.

  • No, but it might have been painted black/dark to match the panel it was set in.

  • egznyc

    IWC – you mean a brand that has a long history of producing pilot watches? As opposed to the new kids on the block who have decided to get all Bremont-y with a little gimmick to add to the appeal of an otherwise standard looking product? Oh but I do like the mix of lume colors even though it doesn’t aide legibility.

  • gyang333

    Not exactly a fan of this whole horcrux thing that they’re now doing.  Following the lead of Bremont…  I own one of their normal non LE models and their customer service is great but this is gimmicky.

  • Josefina Patiño Núñez

    SE ve curioso en dos colores , me gusta !!

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