back to top

TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer-02T Tourbillon Chronograph Watch Review

TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer-02T Tourbillon Chronograph Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

TAG Heuer is going to sell a lot of these… I am, of course, referring to the TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer-02T Tourbillon timepiece that is a new-for-2016 product and is among the most affordable (if not the most affordable) Swiss tourbillon-equipped watch of today. During Baselworld 2015, we debuted the TAG Heuer Carrera-02T Tourbillon (here), which promised an “unheard of” price of about $15,000 for a Swiss tourbillon-based watch. Now that I have one on the wrist, the question is “how did it come out?” and “how good is it for the money?” Let’s explore the interesting story and product that is the newest TAG Heuer tourbillon with its in-house made Heuer-02T movement.

The genesis of the Heuer-02T movement and the TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer-02T Tourbillon watch is multi-layered, so allow me to explain the backstory (again, for some people) as best as I can. This watch did not evolve out of a vacuum, but is rather the result of a series of interesting events coalescing to make for just such a watch to be developed. I suppose the story begins with the movement.

TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer-02T Tourbillon Chronograph Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer-02T Tourbillon Chronograph Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

In 2013, TAG Heuer opened up a new factory in Chevenez, Switzerland, designed to produce their then-new in-house CH80 caliber (where CH actually stood for Chevenez and 80 for its claimed power reserve), as well as their caliber 1887. aBlogtoWatch was extremely excited about the CH 80 (hands-on here with the watch), which would have been a super cool and thoroughly modern automatic chronograph movement. If you click on the link to the article, you can see just how clean and advanced the facility is. For a range of reasons, the CH 80 movement plan was sort of mothballed. My understanding is that for a few reasons TAG Heuer wanted to focus almost exclusively on producing its 1887 movement. I think one reason for this move was that it would have been difficult to separate the CH 80 and 1887 for the consumer in terms of which they should buy, because they, both being automatic chronographs, basically offered the same functionality (even though they had different chronograph layouts and power reserve).

TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer-02T Tourbillon Chronograph Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

While we lamented the fact that we would not see CH 80 movements in TAG Heuer timepieces any time soon, the CH 80 movements found use in an interesting project that would eventually transform them into the Heuer-02T movements. More on that below.

Something else interesting happened in 2015, and that was Jean-Claude Biver taking over as interim CEO of TAG Heuer. Under his leadership, the brand would undergo some changes including overall price reductions, as well as a broadening of the product range to satisfy the aesthetic and lifestyle demands of millennials. While the brand’s iconic Carrera remains part of the collection, TAG Heuer introduced the Carrera Heuer 01 watch (aBlogtoWatch review here) collection as a complement to the rest of the Carrera family.

Advertisement

TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer-02T Tourbillon Chronograph Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer-02T Tourbillon Chronograph Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

The TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer 01 watch introduced a new case design as well as a variation on the 1887 movement known as the caliber Heuer 01. Skeletonized and more modern in execution, the Carrera Heuer 01 signaled a new era of the TAG Heuer brand that Mr. Biver himself commented was part of a larger strategy to take what worked for him at Hublot and apply it to a more accessibly-priced brand plan at TAG Heuer. As a true sign of the times, the TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer 01 case design is used not only in the Carrera Heuer 01 watch, but also the Carrera Connected smartwatch, as well this TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer-02T Tourbillon. In truth, the case design works well for all of these products despite the price differences. TAG Heuer is going for a “brand DNA” look with this new Carrera case, and I think it is working.

TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer-02T Tourbillon Chronograph Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer-02T Tourbillon Chronograph Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

Odd or not, it doesn’t strike me as a negative thing that the brand’s successful smartwatch uses more or less the same case design as the brand’s new flagship tourbillon. It’s a testament to Biver’s capacity for product differentiation as well as brand diversity that this similarity of product forms actually works. Now is also a good time to mention that the TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer-02T Tourbillon is not the brand’s first tourbillon-based timepiece.

In 2012, they debuted the MikrotourbillonS and then, as recently at 2014, TAG Heuer released the Monaco V4 Tourbillon (hands-on here). “Belt-driven” and mounted with a bridge over the top, the Monaco V4’s tourbillon was designed in a different way, but it also came with a price of about $170,000. With that said, I should point out that the design of the Heuer-02T’s tourbillon is inspired by the construction of that in the Monaco V4 Tourbillon. The TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer-02T Tourbillon is also a fraction of the Monaco Tourbillon’s price, starting at about $16,000. For people who have been following the high-end watch industry for a while, that number seems almost impossibly low.

TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer-02T Tourbillon Chronograph Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer-02T Tourbillon Chronograph Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

Speaking of rich-people problems like tourbillon watch prices, TAG Heuer has even more history when it comes to fancy and exotic tourbillons. Going back to just one year earlier in 2013, the brand introduced a concept (that I believe was sold to a few collectors) with the TAG Heuer MikroPendulumS (hands-on here) which, in addition to other engineering feats, included two tourbillons. I am pretty sure that these commanded a price of over $200,000.

When Jean-Claude Biver announced his plans for how to take TAG Heuer into the future, it seemed as though the brand’s “haute horlogerie” division was going to shut down or at least change given that the brand wanted to focus less on exotic timepieces. When it was then announced the brand was going to introduce a new entry-level tourbillon, it opened up people’s eyes to just how dynamic Mr. Biver wanted to make the brand. Today, about 18 months after his taking charge of the brand, it is clear just how diverse and interesting the world of TAG Heuer has and will continue to become.

TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer-02T Tourbillon Chronograph Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer-02T Tourbillon Chronograph Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

So why a tourbillon? This is a pretty good question and not one that I think I can easily answer in this article. Upon debuting the circa $16,000 TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer-02T Tourbillon along with the Carrera Connected, Mr. Biver seemed to inadvertently begin a rhetoric debate with Patek Philippe Chairman Thierry Stern – who has on at least a few occasions spoken out against Biver’s development of a “low cost” tourbillon and other products. Speaking to Corinne Gretler (who I consider to be a very smart reporter and good colleague) at Bloomberg, Stern more or less said that as a Swiss tourbillon, TAG Heuer’s product was too inexpensive. So why would Mr. Stern take that position?

TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer-02T Tourbillon Chronograph Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

As a functional item, a tourbillon only theoretically adds value to a timepiece. It was designed by Breguet in 1795 (patented in 1801) as an experimental means of making travel clocks and pocket watches more accurate. In the mid-20th century, watch brands (Omega was the first) began to experiment with tourbillons in “competition” movements as a means of making them more accurate. They were never really seen as a status symbol, and it was eventually found that, at best, tourbillons were probably only “as accurate” as non-tourbillon watches.

TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer-02T Tourbillon Chronograph Watch Review Wrist Time Reviews

For those that aren’t familiar with what a tourbillon is, it can be explained as a regulation system which revolves on its own axis. The regulation system is more or less comprised of the oscillating balance wheel, hairspring, and escapement. Together, they are mostly responsible for the accuracy of a mechanical movement. Tourbillons put the entire regulation system in a “cage” which rotates around itself, usually once each 60 seconds.

Explore

Comments

Disqus Debug thread_id: 4812131891

  • Nelson

    Cool tourbillon watch but the case diameter is too big for me.

  • Chaz

    Hate the date window

    • john coleman

      What date window???

      • word-merchant

        You know! The dial on the left showing 6 and 12.

        • john coleman

          You mean the 12 hour chronograph counter?? LoL !

          • Chaz

            God…can’t I be sarcastic with the typical watch blog knee jerk comment without someone actually thinking I’m serious??? (note the predictable knee jerk size comment below)

          • word-merchant

            You mean you knew there was no date window? Why didn’t you say?

          • iamcalledryan

            It’s a tough gig. You either use a 😉 and reduce the potency of the sarcastic remark or you go sans emoticon and risk it all. Somewhere out there is a schoolkid developing an app that will change the way we convey sarcasm online and it will make them a billionaire. They are also developing an ironic like button for facebook and a words-cannot-describe-how-‘meh’-this-is button for twitter.

          • Maybe you should have complained about the moon phase, ha ha.

    • JimBob

      I agree. More illegible than my cheapo Citizen. Black on black was a silly choice.

  • Chaz

    I beg to differ that T-H will sell a lot of these.
    Your average T-H customer is loathe to sped more than $3,500 for a Tag (even though he MUST have one) and will try to grind hard for anything priced higher.
    Your average T-H customer doesn’t know the difference between quartz and self winding.
    Your average T-H customer can’t even pronounce TOG HOWYER, much less TOURBILLON.
    Your average T-H customer is looking for that “old school” green and red T-H logo often seen on the Formula 1 series.
    Your average fellow looking to get a tourbillon, on the other hand, is thinking Breguet, VC, JLC, Roger Dubuis, (possibly) GP, and if he’s hardcore…then PP and Lange. He wants something that’ll (in his mind) stand the test of time and possibly…juuuust possibly…retain or gain value.
    I think the response to a T-H tourbillon will be “cute”.

    Just my 2 ?

    • word-merchant

      This might attract Hublot customers who want something slightly more subtle.

      • Chaz

        LOL

    • In light of your no doubt correct assertions, the over $100K TAGs made even less sense, so JCB was no doubt correct to axe them. We will have to wait and see how these do. But even if you are right about them having limited sales, they will still work as halo products that at least are in the same universe as “normal” TAGs. Aloha.

    • Raymond Wilkie

      Rather sweeping statement. …………………….am not saying your wrong.

      • iamcalledryan

        I would challenge such a statement if it didn’t so aptly describe my own earliest days of watch enthusiasm!

        I think Mark’s right though, that this is a better direction for a halo. Look at MB, Fred Constant, and TAG – the three of them have been breaking the entry-point for a variety of complications. I hope for their sake that they all sell well, because these products are the precursor to a fertile field of complicated watches in the $5-&15k point.

    • Coert Welman

      Maybe where you come from. Over here at the southern end of Africa, the majority of decent watches (anything better than Diesel, BOSS, etc) is TAG Heuer and most of the people wearing them know very well what they are wearing. The only people that have every oohed and aahed when they saw my CV2011 Carrera Chronograph Tachymetre where fellow TH owners, because they knew exactly what was on my arm. And that says a lot given that most people think Kinetic and Automatic are the same thing.
      Oh, BTW, it is not TOG, but TAHG. If you want it pronounced in a German-ish manner, that is. Given that the TAG bit is a French acronym, pronouncing it correctly is anyone’s guess.

      I also differ with your “Your average fellow looking to get a tourbillon” statement. The guys who can afford Breguet et al will not buy this. The target audience for this would much rather be those people who would love a tourbillon, but can afford to drop 6 figures and more on a watch. They would know exactly what they are buying.
      Does JCB care about the people who will see this and say “cute”? No. They are not his audience. Just as Richard Mille couldn’t care less about us mere mortals who have to pay off a bond on a house (and who think his watches are garish), just so JCB and TH couldn’t (and shouldn’t) care less about those people. Different target market.
      For the record, I love TH, but I don’t like this at all. If it came in a 41mm case and looking somewhat like Mark Carson’s rendering elsewhere on this thread, then I would have been interested.

      • Chaz

        IF you’d have read into the oozing sarcasm of my comment, you’d know the way I wrote the T-H pronunciation was the way so many T-H “fans” pronounce it. At least on my side of the globe.
        But thanks for enlightening us all.

    • Shinytoys

      Completely disagree, but we can agree to disagree 🙂 Democracy in progress.

    • TechUser2011

      You seem to be missing the point of this watch. It’s not necessarily for the “average Tag Heuer customer” (and I don’t even know what that entails). It’s to draw in a new segment of watch lovers to Tag Heuer. It’s a similar strategy of what they did with the Carrera Connected — that smart watch is not for “the average TH customer” but rather for younger folks who have grown up on smartphones to be drawn into the TH universe of mechanical watches.

      • Peter Zentai

        Fully agree.

  • I guess I’m glad they are making a Swiss whirlwind for $16k (and up to $21K). But I could do without the mostly faux skeleton dial. A nice silver traditional Heuer Carrera dial would look classier IMO. In any event, I’m glad to see that the CH80 movement has not died completely. I wish they had ditched the 1887 movement in favor of the CH80 as the 1887 always makes me think of an ETA 7750 with the similar sub-dial/register layout event though I know the 1887 is a better (column wheel based) movement – thank you Seiko. Always hard to argue with JCB on business decisions, but the CH80 as their only base chronograph movement would have pleased me a lot more.

    • Something like this (based on the Jack Heuer 80th birthday watch)

      • MEddie90

        Works much better, plus the tourbillon is effectively a running seconds so you can have a 30 min counter on the right subdial and a 12 hour on the left, all in all definitely the way it should have been done. JCB has a habit of Hublotizing everything he touches.

      • Coert Welman

        We definitely thought in the same direction with this one. Nicely done. It would be even better if they could fit it into the 41mm case of the JH80th.

  • PleaseSpellRoman4AsIV

    Really cool watch, still slightly above my price range, but it is getting closer. I believe JBC chose a right design and it is a good step again for getting the millennials to wearing watches (maybe after they trade in their TH Connected smartwatch). Will be interesting to see their sales numbers and upcoming new versions.

  • MEddie90

    I like the movement, seems a nice mid level tourbillon that lies between the Chinese options and the more expensive Swiss. Not to fond of the styling though, as Mark says the layout is fine but a traditional Carrera dial with a cutout and a simple steel case would be imho more appropriate.

  • ??????

    Hubloer – huge, skeletonish and telling time was the last thing they thought about.

    • “TAG Heuer” has become “JCB Heuer”, ha ha.

  • Raymond Wilkie

    Big, chunky piece of illegible nonsense.

  • Der0

    I like the tourbillion. It’s a great price. However the aesthetic of the watch is horrible.

  • Vincent

    I may be the minority here but I just love this watch! I think it is a true example of how mechanical movements are mechanically inferior to smart watches and how their function is timeless, pun intended. I believe for this reason it is absolutely crucial the general public (people who can’t comprehend why mechanical watches are so expensive) literally see the mechanical genius behind the price tag. My only wish is that I was at a higher pay grade so I could afford it.

    • Shinytoys

      totally agree…

  • BNABOD

    The design has grown on me over the year but the hands blend in too much and while it is stealthy the fact that it is the size of a small nuclear reactor is not a good thing. Understated elegance I think not, think more cowboy boots at black tie party it just does not work well. Too much of a cool movement in a blunt instrument while reasonably priced whatever that means

  • Dear Jean-Claude Biver:
    Please make a dual-register chrono, preferably with a GMT complication. Resurrect the Autavia line. Bring the Aquagraph out of retirement. No one who buys TAGs gives a shit about tourbillions.”

    Sincerely,
    Guy who still buys TAGs.

  • SuperStrapper

    I tried one on and while the tale of the tape told me it wouldn’t make for a good wearing around watch, I found it fit comfortably and looked good on the wrist. It’s a big watch, no doubt, but I did not find it ungainly. I very seriously considered taking it home, and while I did not I scratch my head as to why, to be honest. The dealer gave me a very digestible number. I may own one soon. Not the all back though, but not because I don’t like it. There is an iteration I prefer.

  • Ulysses31

    A soulless smudge-magnet with a nice bezel. It’d look better without the tourbillon, since it is already quite discreet, isn’t something of beauty to look at compared to tourbillons from other vendors, and jacks up the price for a watch with an aesthetic that would fit perfectly in the Police range. From a cursory glance (ignoring the tourbillon) you’d think it was a fashion branded quartz. Tag does a few beautiful chronographs – pick one of those, save some money unless you absolutely have to have a tourbillon in your life.

    • JimBob

      Nixon, or Michael Kors?

  • TrevorXM

    A tasteless fool and his money are soon parted. The Hublot collectors now have an official beater watch.

  • Shinytoys

    WELCOME BACK HEUER !!! I MISSED YOU MORE THAN YOU’LL EVER KNOW.
    The look and feel of a truly handcrafted watch with a flying tourbillion and an COSC stamp of approval says to me you are back from the dead and heading in the right direction. Did you borrow a bit of the look of the Hublot, I’d say yes but I’m not going to lose sleep nor do I think you copied Hublot that you lost your identity in the process. All of this starting around $16,000 is music to my ears. What a beautiful piece. Fit and finish that harken beck to the old Carrera and Autavia days. GOOD FOR YOU !!! Keep on going and you will return back to the top of the horological mountain where you once reigned supreme. GREAT TO HAVE YOU BACK !!!

    • Larry Holmack

      I love it!!! Nice size for a big guy like me….and considering what you are getting, the price is really great!! Now…how do I slip a $16 grand watch purchase past my wife????

      • Shinytoys

        very quietly…

        • Larry Holmack

          If only that would work!!!

      • DanW94

        You mean ex-wife if you get the watch…

      • Chaz

        COSTCO will probably have them for $6k

  • Bambi6666

    Tag Heuer producing his 1887 mov.? Lol it’s Seiko TC78 and you perfectly know that Ariel!
    Not a good thing that my bullshit detector is tickling since the beginning of the article…

    • MEddie90

      Tag produce the 1887 but most of the patents belong to Seiko so I don’t really see how the statement is false. The article even calls the CH80 inhouse but does not extend the same honour to the 1887, not really very misleading if you ask me.

      • Bambi6666

        Well, to be fair I’d that Tag assembles the 1887 with Japanese pieces. Babin said it himself. They basically change one bridge and the rotor plus blueing the column wheel. So yes, it’s a Tag mov. not manufactured by them. Here, in this paid review ordered by Tah was pretty confusing so I just wanted to clarify the thing.
        Anyway, this tourbillon is a great new and might deeply change the Swiss watchmaking industry

        • MEddie90

          Tag makes about 80% of the 1887 parts in Switzerland to my recollection, but i may be wrong.

          I agree on the new movement, its nice to see a revival of the CH80, much better dial layout than the 1887 plus a shade thinner and actually an in-house manufacture and design. An all round winner for Tag, shame they scrapped it.

          Edit: Found a source :http://www.calibre11.com/calibre-1887-story/

        • David Bredan

          Thanks for your comment.
          It’d be great to see some of your claims backed up with sources – I’d like to see where Babin said “Tag assembles the 1887 with Japanese pieces” or that “They basically change one bridge and the rotor plus blueing the column wheel”, and also what led you to figure this was a paid review (which reviews on this site have never been and never will be).
          TAG does manufacture the 1887, and while they sure use some sourced parts, if you were to “allow” only those brands that make 100% (or even 90%) of their movements and their parts in-house, a minor – and I do mean extremely small – fraction of them all could claim that they make anything. Clearly that is not the case, and as long as you have a manufacture as complex/large/capable as the ones TAG does, I guess you can actually say you make stuff in there.

          • Bambi6666

            Hello,
            sure, no problem for my sources. First one from wus : http://forums.watchuseek.com/f2/tag-heuer-shamed-into-admitting-manufacture-cal-1887-bought-seiko-336032.html#/enter

            Next one, more concrete, but in French (sorry) : http://www.lefigaro.fr/flash-eco/2012/03/21/97002-20120321FILWWW00611-montres-tag-heuer-s-equipera-chez-seiko.php

            The 1887 is Swiss because 80% of his price – and not his components – come from a process in side Switzerland. So, basically, a custom rotor and main bridge plus few tweaks here and there. And it’s enough because things happening in Switzerland are sooo overpriced, especially workforce.

            Maybe I’m wrong maybe I’m right maybe both. The Swiss watchmaking industry is so kept into darkness and opacity that we won’t know what’s really happening there.

            I’m glad to learn that you don’t do paid review. I never read it anywhere and I assumed it was when I read words that sometimes sound quite like publicity.

            Anyway, thank you for your time. It’s always a pleasure to share ideas and create a debate by questioning things we all thought were legit and guaranteed

          • MEddie90

            To my knowledge Babin only states that the design of the plates and rotor has changed not that they are the only parts they manufacture. It is my understanding that most of the components are manufactured in Switzerland to the original Seiko spec but several are upgraded from the original.

            270 of the 320 parts are made and manufactured in Switzerland by Tag Heuer so I think its fair to say its manufactured (Same source as my other comment).

  • Reprobus Marmaritarum

    Ugly great wallclock fit for a batcave, little else.

  • DanW94

    Great watch if you really, really want an entry level Swiss tourbillon. If you want a tourbillon that truly falls into the “affordable” range for most people, look to the far east. I find Thierry Stern’s hissy fit over the watch much more interesting than the watch itself. Stick it to the man, Biver!! (as much as you can call a 16k watch sticking it to the man…lol)

  • Questwatch

    Swatch made a very nice tourbillon back in 2002, Diaphane one. Cheap and cant get Swisser then Swatch i think. So what is Stern wining on about ??

  • TechUser2011

    Really amazing watch. My biggest concern is not that it has a relatively hefty price, but rather that I would stare at the dial all day long. As Ariel said in the video review, the spinning complication just draws your eyes in.

    I really love how Tag Heuer is moving forward right now on three parallel paths. One path is the avante-garde direction, such as with the Carrera Connected and this new tourbillon watch. The other path is along historic lines such as the reissues/reimaginings (2015 Monaco, 2016 Monza, and next year’s 2017 Autativa). The third path is their traditional lineup (Carrera, Aquaracer, F1, etc.). Few companies have the R&D capability, the manufacturing capacity, and willpower to do that.

    • ??????

      I see how its moving in Hublot direction and thats all.

      • Jamez c

        Which is not good. I don’t wanna see a limited edition TH for the Manchester City, Monaco, Bayer Leverkusen or AC Milan.

  • cluedog12

    Great entry from TAG Heuer – it looks fantastic and it democratizes the golden goose.

    Many brands have relied on the tourbillon to announce to the world, “This is a watch worth $100,000 and we are a prestigious brand that sells a $100,000 watch.” Already by 2008, it was cynical and lazy. If this Carrera marks the beginning of the end to this decade-long tourbillon spree, it is a day long overdue.

    • iamcalledryan

      The tourbillon is dead. Long live the multi-axis tourbillon!

      • DanW94

        Much like the ancient Hydra, the tourbillon will never die! If you cut it out, 2 or 3 more will rise to take it’s place…..

        • iamcalledryan

          That’s fine, but what I really want to see is a tilted tourbillon of tourbillons. OF TOURBILLONS.

          On a side note, check out this speeded up video of the above – it’s very cool.

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7jp5uavYJ6s

          • ??????

            Just wait till ArtYa Son of Tourbillons will come out: it will be made from them

          • Shinytoys

            That is sexy…

          • FXD

            That would make me dizzy

  • Sevenmack

    Very industrial and steampunk, this TAG is. Love it! The boo-birds will hate it, especially those who will continue to say that TAG’s in-house chronometer movement is just a Seiko movement in disguise (in spite of what the reality shows). This will sell out. Quickly. Wish I could be one of those who acquire it.

  • mandimemike

    Conceptually, I think this is great. A tribute of sorts to the functional history of the tourbillon married to TAG’s marquis chrono movement. This stark, rough, almost raw display of the tourbillon transmits what this watch is all about, cost savings in both finishing and manufacturing efficiency for the democratizing of the tourbillon. The effort it takes to make this happen is something to be appreciated.

    If I were to place myself in the position of a potential buyer though, it wouldn’t make my list. First, the size. It’s obvious the movement is big, and I don’t see much room for reduction to perhaps 43mm. The modular case and architectural lugs however, are attractive but 45 is gigantic. Second, the dial does not possess the sense of purpose that the rest of the watch does. The faux skeleton effect adds clutter, tries to hard and fails in it’s pretense as a skeleton. I appreciate the barrel bridge, but otherwise the dial (and barrel cover) should be simpler, in harmony with the presentation of the tourbillon. Ok, the tourbillon. An achievement for sure, but modern tourbillons are animated showpieces of mechanical art. I adore the painstaking polishing, beveling, the changing play with light. It’s pure drama on display in the traditional presentation. Will I ever be able to own one? Not likely, and I’m ok with that. This simply lacks that element of artistry for me. Finally the price. While laudable, it is still priced several tiers above the rest of TAG’s range, and will be something aspirational buyers will have to save for. That being said, the secondary values of such a watch is an unknown. This may be too big of a risk for many in this position to take, even if they like the watch on their wrist. In any case, I have no doubt there will be buyers lining up for these. I for one, would much rather be hunting Lange 1815’s on the secondary market for this kind of money!

  • wallydog2

    Sure glad I’m a retired fart with a good pension, and not dependent on the watch-du-jour industry.

  • Michael Kinney

    Woooow…. I don’t “get” tourbillons, I’m not crazy about skeletonized movements….but man, oh man is that a looker. 4 Hz? COSC? 100 M? Ti? Nothing about it isn’t totally cool. I’m gonna save up for bigger wrists. Absolutely stunning.
    As for tachymeter scales…haven’t you ever wondered if the speedometer in your car is actually accurate? Easy to check on any straight mile.

  • commentator bob

    Heuer is being quite disruptive here. This will actually be good for Patek because it will thin out all the hokey brands offering six figure tourbillons. Patek’s brand is strong enough to command a premium.

  • commentator bob

    It’s too bad that the CH80 did not make it into the regular Heuer-01. For $5k it deserves more than a previous generation Seiko movement.

  • cg

    Will this Tourbillon fad just please STOP! Expect less from TH with Biver at the helm. I would be interested to know how many left the company when banal Biver took over and down played them. Too big for those Ethiopian basketball players.

  • Richard Baptist

    I love this watch, and love the price. I like the industrial design of the skeleton look. I love the fact that it is an automatic, COSC certifed and 65 hours of reserve. I prefer the regular edition as that seems more legible. They will probably sell a boat load of these. I still can’t afford it but I’m actually tired of the tourbillon as a feature. It’s a little big but hey, its a sports watch. I would really like to see it in the flesh, because I think it would blow me away. It’s a disrupter of a watch and I like those.

  • Erik Törnberg

    To me it seems as Mr Biver is turning Tag into Hublot 2.0. I find it very sad, as I personally find Hublot to be too in-your-face neveau-riche trashy show-off pieces. I am very fond of Tags racing heritage, but the brand is dead for me now. Cheap, big complications is not for me.

    • Jamez c

      I hear you man!

  • Jamez c

    I personally think Mr. Biver is a marketing genius for the masses. I honestly respect the man and his work, but I do hear you man. And it’s definitely sad!! I do like Hublots and Tag but I’m liking them a little less than eachday. That being said, I would take Mr. Biver over Mr. Guadalupe every time.

  • John Smith

  • Drop files here or
    Accepted file types: jpg, png.